1 - 3 of 3
rss atomLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
  • Eriksson, Cecilia
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College.
    Eriksson, Linn
    The Swedish Red Cross University College.
    Inequities in health care: lessons from New Zealand: A qualitative interview study about the cultural safety theory2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: According to the World Health Organisation, the indigenous Māori are reportedly the most marginalised ethnic group with the poorest health status in New Zealand. Cultural safety theory is a part of nursing programmes in New Zealand with the aim to reduce inequities within the health care system. AIM: The aim of this study is to illuminate nurses’ views about the cultural safety theory in relation to inequities within the health care system in New Zealand. METHOD: A qualitative empirical approach based on semi-structured indepth interviews was applied. Six interviews were conducted and data was analysed using Graneheim and Lundmans manifest content analysis. RESULTS: Two categories were identified and became representative as a result, Nursing Strategies and Working with Challenges. CONCLUSION: The findings in this study suggest that nurses’ have an overall positive attitude towards working with cultural safety theory and believe the theory to be an opportunity to change attitudes, and be a potential tool to reduce inequities within the health care system. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Illuminating nurses’ perspectives about cultural safety can contribute to a better understanding of working with different cultures and hopefully reduce inequities within the health care system.

  • Bruno, Linn
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College.
    Lindh, Cecilia
    The Swedish Red Cross University College.
    Healthcare professionals’ experiences of working with abortion care in Ghana: A qualitative study about saving lives2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Abortion continues to be stigmatized in Ghana even though Ghana has one of the most liberal abortion laws in West Africa. This stigmatization discourages women from having safe abortion and discourages the health care professionals to provide services for abortion. The recruitment of healthcare providers is therefore marginalized, isolated and difficult. Aim: The aim of the study is to describe the healthcare professionals’ experiences of working with the abortion care in Ghana. Method: Five qualitative, semi-structured interviews were conducted with healthcare professionals working at two different governmentally owned hospitals in Ghana. The findings were analysed with qualitative content analysis. Results: Four main themes emerged in this study describing healthcare professionals’ experiences of working with abortion care in Ghana; Context, Nursing care, Challenges and Saving lives. The healthcare professionals work is stigmatized and challenging but the best part of their profession was helping adolescents, families and saving lives. Conclusion: To save lives, enhance the working situation for the healthcare professionals and to reduce stigma, education and better working environment is necessary.

  • Kroon, Sally
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College.
    Binsalamah, Sarah
    The Swedish Red Cross University College.
    Nursing students’ views on female genital mutilation in Tanzania2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Female genital mutilation (FGM) has been illegal in Tanzania since 1998; nonetheless this procedure is still being performed in some regions of the country. Since the prohibition of this practice it has become harder to detect the practitioners. Nurses are one of the professions who can identify the women who have been exposed to FGM, which creates an opportunity to provide care for these women and educate them about the practice. The aim of this study is to describe Tanzanian nursing students’ views on FGM. Data was collected with focus group interviews with second and third year students at a nursing school in northwest Tanzania. Data was analysed inductively by content analysis. The results, the students’ views on FGM, were categorised into four themes; ‘FGM creates suffering’, ‘the right to sexual integrity’, ‘the role of nurses’ and ‘educating the patient and the community’. The findings clearly demonstrate that the students’ negative attitudes toward the practice are based on their knowledge of its harmful implications on health. For further research, it may be of interest to study nursing students’ views of the practice in more FGM-prevalent regions of Tanzania.