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  • Barkestad, Eva
    et al.
    Andersson, Ingrid
    Gustafsson, Ingrid
    Hyllienmark, Petra
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Stevens, Lena
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Säkra kunskap och kvalitet: utmaningar för framtidens anestesi och intensivvårdssjuksköterska2017In: Ventilen, ISSN 0348-6257, no 4, p. 16-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Learning Strategies is a Prerequisite for High Quality Nursing Care in the PICU2018In: Acta Scientific Paediatrics, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 1-2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sometimes children get so sick that they rapidly become omitted to the most advanced level of pediatric care, the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). This is a strange place where noise and scent as well as the touch feels different [1] to all other experiences the child might have had prior to the omittance. Research have shown that the parents perspective for the future is only a few hours [2] when their child are at the PICU. They all, in their own ways, balance between life and death. There is a real threat that the care in a PICU might end in the death of the child. In this context the PICU nurse works, learns and balances here nursing care interventions to support the child, the parents as well as being a team member with exceptional skills [3]. 

  • Wimo, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Children's Participation in the PICU from the Nurses’ Perspective, an Observational Study2018In: Acta Scientific Paediatrics, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 12-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children who are critically ill are vulnerable, and the nurse has a responsibility to meet the child`s needs in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU).

    Aim: The aim was to explore the vulnerable child's participation and how it can be understood through the nurses’ perspective in the nursing care intervention.

    Design: The study design was an exploratory inductive qualitative approach. Data collection was done through observations and interviews. The data from the observations were analyzed through interpretive phenomenology.

    Results: The affective elements were viewed as essential to uncover how children participate in the PICU. Three themes emerged through the analysis: Mediated participation, Bodily participation and Participation by proxy. They all highlight a different aspect of the vulnerable child's way of participating in the nursing care given, through nurses' awareness and situated salience. The concept of participation should be redefined and broadened; as participation can present itself through the child's body in diverse ways.

  • Nordhall, Ola
    et al.
    University of Gävle.
    Knez, Igor
    University of Gävle.
    Saboonchi, Fredrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Predicting general mental health and exhaustion: the role of emotion and cognition components of personal and collective work-identity.2018In: Heliyon, ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 4, no 8, article id e00735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between emotion and cognition components of personal and collective work-identity and self-reported general mental health and exhaustion, in Swedish teachers (N = 768). In line with our predictions, we showed that the emotion component of personal work-identity and the cognition component of collective work-identity associated positively with general mental health and negatively with exhaustion. The reverse result was found, however, for the cognition component of personal work-identity and emotion component of collective work-identity. In general, all this indicates that person-work bonding might, to some degree, account for general mental health and exhaustion in employees. In particular, the findings suggest that general mental health and exhaustion may vary symmetrically across the: (1) Type of person-work bonding (personal vs. collective work-identity); and (2) Type of psychological component (emotion vs. cognition) involved in personal- and collective work-identity.

  • Gyllensten, Hanna
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet / University of Gothenburg.
    Kavaliunas, Andrius
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hillert, Jan
    Karolinska Institutet / Karolinska University Hospital.
    Tinghög, Petter
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Friberg, Emilie
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Costs and quality of life by disability among people with multiple sclerosis: a register-based study in Sweden2018In: Multiple sclerosis journal - experimental, translational and clinical, E-ISSN 2055-2173, Vol. 4, no 3, article id 2055217318783352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Population-based estimates of costs of illness and health-related quality of life, by disability levels among people with multiple sclerosis, are lacking.

    Objectives: To estimate the annual costs of illness and health-related quality of life, by disability levels, among multiple sclerosis patients, 21-64 years of age.

    Methods: Microdata from Swedish nationwide registers were linked to estimate the prevalence-based costs of illness in 2013, including direct costs (prescription drug use and specialised healthcare) and indirect costs (calculated using sick leave and disability pension), and health-related quality of life (estimated from the EQ-5D). Disability level was measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS).

    Results: Among 8906 multiple sclerosis patients, EDSS 0.0-3.5 and 7.0-9.5 were associated with mean indirect costs of SEK 117,609 and 461,357, respectively, whereas direct costs were similar between the categories (SEK 117,423 and 102,714, respectively). Prescription drug costs represented 40% of the costs of illness among multiple sclerosis patients with low EDSS, while among patients with high EDSS more than 80% were indirect costs. Among the 1684 individuals who had reported both EQ-5D and EDSS, the lowest health-related quality of life scores were found among those with a high EDSS.

    Conclusion: Among people with multiple sclerosis, we confirmed higher costs and lower health-related quality of life in higher disability levels, in particular high indirect costs.