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Kidayi, P. L., Pakpour, A. H., Saboonchi, F., Bray, F., Manhica, H., Mtuya, C. C., . . . Björling, G. (2023). Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the Swahili Version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-BR45 among Breast Cancer Patients in Tanzania. Healthcare, 11(18), Article ID 2467.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Psychometric Properties of the Swahili Version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-BR45 among Breast Cancer Patients in Tanzania
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2023 (English)In: Healthcare, E-ISSN 2227-9032, Vol. 11, no 18, article id 2467Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in women in Africa and contributes to premature death and poor quality of life. This study aimed to determine the validity, reliability, and psychometric properties of the Swahili version of EORTC QLQ-BR45 among women with breast cancer in Tanzania. A cross-sectional study design with non-probability convenience sampling was employed. Data were collected in two tertiary hospitals and one national cancer institute; 414 participants completed the EORTC-QLQ-C-30 and EORTC-QLQ-BR45. The reliability of QLQ-BR45 was measured using Cronbach's alpha and McDonald's Omega coefficients. The factor structure of EORTC QLQ-BR45 was assessed using confirmatory factor analysis. The internal consistencies for the five dimensions were all above 0.7 indicating satisfaction, except for systemic therapy side effects with a marginal value of 0.594 and significant correlations between the dimensions of QLQ-C30 and BR45. The final model fit well to the data, with the comparative fit index = 0.953, Tucker-Lewis index = 0.947, root mean square error of approximation = 0.041 (90% CI: 0.035, 0.046), and standardized root mean square residual = 0.072. In conclusion, the QLQ BR45 Swahili version displayed good reliability, validity, and psychometric properties and can be used in Swahili-speaking Sub-Saharan countries.

Keywords
breast cancer, psychometric properties, quality of life, reliability, validation
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-4676 (URN)10.3390/healthcare11182467 (DOI)37761665 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-10-11 Created: 2023-10-11 Last updated: 2023-10-12Bibliographically approved
Solberg, Ø., Nissen, A. & Saboonchi, F. (2023). Post-migration stressors, mental health and well-being in resettled refugees from Syria: Do individuals’ coping strategies matter?. Conflict and Health, 17(1), Article ID 60.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Post-migration stressors, mental health and well-being in resettled refugees from Syria: Do individuals’ coping strategies matter?
2023 (English)In: Conflict and Health, ISSN 1752-1505, E-ISSN 1752-1505, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 60Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The evidence is mixed as to whether individuals' coping strategies may mitigate the adverse mental health effects of post-displacement stressors in refugee populations, with some indications that the buffering effects of coping strategies are context dependent. The present study examined if problem-solving and acceptance coping strategies were effect modifiers between post-migration stressors and mental health in adult refugees from Syria resettled in Sweden.

Methods: Study aims were investigated using cross-sectional survey data from a nationwide, randomly sampled group of adult refugees from Syria granted permanent residency in Sweden between 2011 and 2013 (Nsample = 4000, nrespondents = 1215, response rate 30.4%). Post-migration stressors examined included: financial strain, social strain, host-country competency strain and discrimination. Two mental health outcomes were used: anxiety/depression, measured with the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25; and well-being, measured with the WHO-5 Well-being Index. Both outcomes were modelled continuously. Coping strategies were measured using the BRIEF Cope scale. Interactions between coping strategies and post-migration stressors were tested in fully adjusted linear regression models using Wald test for interaction, corrected for multiple testing using the Benjamini-Hochberg procedure.

Results: Both problem-solving and acceptance coping strategies buffered the adverse association between financial strain and symptoms of anxiety/depression, and problem-solving coping strategies buffered the adverse association between host-country competency strain and anxiety/depression.

Conclusions: The study suggests that individuals' coping strategies may to some degree buffer the adverse mental health effects of financial strain and host-country competency strain experienced by refugees in the resettlement phase. Although this pattern was only found in regard to anxiety/depression and not subjective well-being, the findings show that individual-level coping skills among refugees may contribute to adaptation in the face of post-settlement adversities. Notwithstanding the importance of attending to refugees' psychosocial conditions, refugees residing in refugee camps and newly resettled refugees might benefit from interventions aiming at enhancing individual coping resources and skills. The potential effect of increased controllability and decreased conflict-proximity also warrants further exploration in future studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Anxiety, Coping, Depression, Mental health, Post-migration stress, Refugees, Well-being
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-4743 (URN)10.1186/s13031-023-00556-3 (DOI)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-07194
Available from: 2024-01-03 Created: 2024-01-03 Last updated: 2024-01-03Bibliographically approved
Solberg, Ø., Sengoelge, M., Johnson-Singh, C. M., Vaez, M., Eriksson, A.-K. & Saboonchi, F. (2022). Health-related quality of life in refugee minors from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan resettled in Sweden: a nation-wide, cross-sectional study. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 255-266
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health-related quality of life in refugee minors from Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan resettled in Sweden: a nation-wide, cross-sectional study
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2022 (English)In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, p. 255-266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To examine health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in refugee minors resettled in Sweden and compare results to a European reference population, while exploring associations between sociodemographic factors and HRQoL dimensions.

METHODS: A cross-sectional, nation-wide study was conducted with a stratified sample of refugee minors ages 12-15 and 16-18 from Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria, resettled in Sweden between 2014 and 2018. HRQoL was measured using KIDSCREEN-27. HRQoL dimension scores of the sample were compared to mean scores of European age and gender-matched reference population. Associations between sociodemographic factors and HRQoL dimensions were investigated with independent t tests and ANOVA. A multivariable regression analysis was performed to identify the sociodemographic factors associated with HRQoL.

RESULTS: The questionnaire was sent to 10,000 potential respondents. The response rate was 26%, yielding n = 2559 refugee minors (boys 55%, girls 45%) in the study sample. Compared to European references, minors in the present study had significantly lower scores of HRQoL within psychological wellbeing and peers and social support, whereas levels for autonomy and parent/guardian relations and school environment were higher. Several sociodemographic factors were significantly associated with all HRQoL dimensions, with those 16-18 years old, having average or poor family economy, and living with an unrelated adult or family reporting lower levels of HRQoL. Minors from Afghanistan had significantly lower scores of HRQoL for all dimensions compared to those from Iraq and Syria.

CONCLUSION: Refugee minors had significantly lower levels of HRQoL for psychological wellbeing and peers and social support compared to European references. Future research should further investigate this potential HRQoL gap further.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2022
Keywords
Health-related quality of life, KIDSCREEN-27, Minors, Refugees, Resettlement
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-3790 (URN)10.1007/s00127-021-02050-8 (DOI)33754158 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-03-29 Created: 2021-03-29 Last updated: 2022-01-31Bibliographically approved
Solberg, Ø., Sengoelge, M., Nissen, A. & Saboonchi, F. (2021). Coping in Limbo?: The Moderating Role of Coping Strategies in the Relationship between Post-Migration Stress and Well-Being during the Asylum-Seeking Process. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 18(3), Article ID 1004.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coping in Limbo?: The Moderating Role of Coping Strategies in the Relationship between Post-Migration Stress and Well-Being during the Asylum-Seeking Process
2021 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, no 3, article id 1004Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Asylum seekers are faced with high levels of post-migratory stress due to uncertainty and uncontrollability of the application process, resulting in higher levels of mental health problems. Little is known about the coping strategies utilized by asylum seekers in this context. Structural equation modeling and the stepwise modeling approach were utilized on cross-sectional data from a cohort of asylum seekers in Sweden (N = 455) to examine whether adaptive coping in the form of problem-focused and cognitive-based coping would buffer the impact of post-migratory stressors by moderating the relationship between the stressors and well-being. Fit indices showed good to excellent fit of the final model that regressed well-being on selected post-migratory stressors and coping (CFI = 0.964, RMSEA = 0.043 (90% CI = 0.035–0.051), SRMR = 0.044). Well-being was negatively and significantly regressed on both perceived discrimination (B = −0.42, SE = 0.11, p < 0.001) and distressing family conflicts (B = −0.16, SE = 0.07, p = 0.037), and positively and significantly regressed on cognitive restructuring (B = 0.71, SE = 0.33, p = 0.030). There was, however, no evidence that coping strategies modified the adverse associations between the two post-migratory stressors and well-being. Interventions and policies should prioritize improving contextual factors inherent in the asylum-seeking process in order to reduce stress and enable coping.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2021
Keywords
asylum seekers, coping, stressors, mental well-being, perceived discrimination, family conflicts
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-3766 (URN)10.3390/ijerph18031004 (DOI)000615179900001 ()33498731 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-07194
Available from: 2021-02-01 Created: 2021-02-01 Last updated: 2021-03-04Bibliographically approved
Helgesson, M., Rahman, S., Saboonchi, F. & Mittendorfer Rutz, E. (2021). Disability pension and mortality in individuals with specific somatic and mental disorders: examining differences between refugees and Swedish-born individuals. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 75(8), 721-728
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disability pension and mortality in individuals with specific somatic and mental disorders: examining differences between refugees and Swedish-born individuals
2021 (English)In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 75, no 8, p. 721-728Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background More than half a million refugees have arrived to Sweden during the last decade. The aim was to investigate differences between refugees and Swedish-born individuals regarding different specific somatic and mental disorders, and subsequent disability pension and mortality. Methods All refugees (n=239 742) and Swedish-born individuals (n=4 133 898), aged 19-60 years, resident in Sweden on 31st of December in 2009 were included in this population-based prospective cohort study. Data from six nationwide Swedish registers were linked by the unique anonymised identification number. HRs with 95% CIs were computed for disability pension and mortality 2010-2013 by Cox regression models. Results Compared with their Swedish-born counterparts with mental or somatic diagnoses, refugees with these diagnoses had a higher risk of subsequent disability pension and a lower risk of mortality. Highest estimates for disability pension were seen for refugees with neoplasm (HR: 1.72; 95% CI: 1.56 to 1.91), musculoskeletal disorders (HR: 1.57; 95% CI: 1.47 to 1.67), diseases of the circulatory system (HR: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.22 to 1.45), depressive disorders (HR: 1.31; 95% CI: 1.21 to 1.41) and diabetes mellitus (HR: 1.30; 95% CI: 1.15 to 1.47). The risk of mortality was lowest for refugees with regard to bipolar disorders (HR: 0.37; 95% CI: 0.16 to 0.82), post-traumatic stress disorder (HR: 0.37; 95% CI: 0.25 to 0.54) and least pronounced in regard to neoplasm (HR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.61 to 0.77) compared with Swedish-born with similar disorders. Conclusion Refugees have a generally higher risk of disability pension compared with Swedish-born with specific somatic and mental disorders. Despite this, refugees with all specific disorders have lower risk estimates of mortality, probably due to a healthy selection. The higher risk of disability pension might therefore be due to other causes besides poor health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2021
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-4088 (URN)10.1136/jech-2019-213436 (DOI)33472869 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-07194
Available from: 2021-08-17 Created: 2021-08-17 Last updated: 2021-08-17Bibliographically approved
Okenwa-Emegwa, L., Tinghög, P., Vaez, M. & Saboonchi, F. (2021). Exposure to Violence Among Syrian Refugee Women Preflight and During Flight: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study in Sweden. SAGE Open, 11(3)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exposure to Violence Among Syrian Refugee Women Preflight and During Flight: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study in Sweden
2021 (English)In: SAGE Open, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 11, no 3Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Violence against women (VAW) is a hidden aspect of humanitarian emergencies, especially during conflicts, and prevalence estimates remain scarce. An adequate response to VAW in humanitarian contexts requires information regarding the extent of the problem and associated factors, including the role of past violence. This study is a questionnaire survey of a random sample of 452 Syrian refugee women resettled in Sweden. Findings show that the prevalence of any violence preflight and during flight was 25.1% and 7.8%, respectively. Older women and women exposed to violence preflight were more likely to experience violence during flight. Findings suggest the need for more trauma-informed systems of handling asylum seekers and refugees, as a humanitarian principle. Other implications for research and practice are discussed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2021
Keywords
physical violence, resettlement, sexual violence, torture, violence against women
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-4090 (URN)10.1177/21582440211031555 (DOI)000691258600001 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2017-07194
Available from: 2021-08-17 Created: 2021-08-17 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Nissen, A., Cauley, P., Saboonchi, F., Andersen, A. J. & Solberg, Ø. (2021). Mental health in adult refugees from Syria resettled in Norway between 2015 and 2017: a nationwide, questionnaire-based, cross-sectional prevalence study. European Journal of Psychotraumatology, 12(1), Article ID 1994218.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mental health in adult refugees from Syria resettled in Norway between 2015 and 2017: a nationwide, questionnaire-based, cross-sectional prevalence study
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2021 (English)In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8198, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 1994218Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background The number of forcibly displaced people globally has never been higher, with refugees from Syria constituting the largest displaced population worldwide. Many studies have documented elevated levels of mental health problems in refugee populations, though prevalence estimates of common mental disorders vary considerably between studies, explained both by methodological and contextual factors.

Objective Using questionnaire-based screening checklists to approximate the prevalence of and investigate risk factors for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety and depression among adult refugees from Syria resettled in Norway and to compare estimates with a sister-study in Sweden.

Method Cross-sectional survey of a randomly selected sample from the National Population Register in Norway of adult refugees from Syria who were granted residency rights in Norway between 2015 and 2017 (N (sample) = 9,990; n (respondents) = 902). Above-threshold scores on the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ) and Hopkins Symptoms Checklist (HSCL-25) defined caseness for PTSD (HTQ>2.06); anxiety (HSCLanxitey>1.75); and depression (HSCLdepression>1.80).

Results Weighted, checklist-positive prevalence estimates for PTSD, anxiety and depression were 29.7% (25.4%-34.4%), 30.1% (25.7%-34.9%), and 45.2% (40.6%-49.8%), respectively. Cumulative exposure to potentially traumatic experiences before or during flight was a clear risk factor for all outcomes, and female gender was a risk factor for anxiety and depression, though only in adjusted analyses. The choice of HTQ cut-off to define PTSD caseness (2.5 vs. 2.06) had a notable effect on prevalence estimates.

Conclusion In line with prior evidence, the present study suggests adult refugees from Syria resettled in Norway have higher rates of anxiety and depression and markedly higher rates of PTSD compared to general, non-refugee populations, and that this is clearly linked to past traumatic experiences. Prevalence estimates were highly consistent with estimates from the sister-study in Sweden, which used almost identical methodology. Findings underline the importance of screening for and intervening on mental health problems in newly arrived refugees.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2021
Keywords
Refugees, Syria, Norway, mental health, prevalence, PTSD, anxiety, depression, traumatic experiences
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-4167 (URN)10.1080/20008198.2021.1994218 (DOI)000727034500001 ()34900120 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-12-16 Created: 2021-12-16 Last updated: 2021-12-21Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, H., Gustavsson, C., Gottvall, M. & Saboonchi, F. (2021). Physical activity, post-traumatic stress disorder, and exposure to torture among asylum seekers in Sweden: a cross-sectional study.. BMC Psychiatry, 21(1), Article ID 452.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical activity, post-traumatic stress disorder, and exposure to torture among asylum seekers in Sweden: a cross-sectional study.
2021 (English)In: BMC Psychiatry, E-ISSN 1471-244X, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 452Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Forced migrant populations have high rates of trauma-related ill health, including post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Physical activity (PA) is well-established as an effective stress reliever, while insufficient PA is associated with adverse effects on both mental and physical health. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of different levels of PA and its association with PTSD symptom severity, controlled for exposure to torture, among asylum seekers in Sweden.

METHODS: A cross-sectional survey study, with data from 455 asylum seekers, originating from Afghanistan, Eritrea, Iraq, Somalia, and Syria, residing at large housing facilities across Sweden. Level of PA was assessed by the Exercise Vital Sign and categorized as; Inactive, Insufficient PA, and Sufficient PA. Prevalence estimates for proportions of different levels of PA were calculated. Analysis of variance were conducted to determine the association between levels of PA and PTSD symptom severity, measured by the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the contribution of PA on PTSD beyond sex, age, and exposure to torture.

RESULTS: About half of the participants (53.3, 95% CI: 48.6-58.1) met the recommendations for Sufficient PA. One third of the participants (33.3, 95% CI: 28.7-37.8) were insufficiently engaged in PA, and 13.4% (95% CI: 10.1-16.7) were inactive. There was a significant difference in PTSD symptom severity between groups of asylum seekers with different levels of PA (F(2, 316) = 23.15, p < .001). When controlling for sex, age, and exposure to torture, Sufficient PA was found to be associated with less PTSD symptom severity compared to both Insufficient PA (B = 0.297, SE = 0.086, p < .001) and Inactive (B = 0.789, SE = 0.104, p < .001).

CONCLUSIONS: Insufficient PA was common among the asylum seekers and our findings suggest that more PA is highly associated with lower PTSD symptom severity. An increased focus on assessment and promotion of PA is justified and discussed as particularly pertinent considering the much extended time of asylum-seeking processes. The results support previous evidence of PA as a potentially important factor in the context of PTSD and forced migrants' health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2021
Keywords
Asylum seeker, Mental health, PTSD, Physical activity, Post-migration stress, Post-traumatic stress disorder, Refugee, Torture, Trauma
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-4102 (URN)10.1186/s12888-021-03461-2 (DOI)34530806 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-09-28 Created: 2021-09-28 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Nahlén Bose, C., Saboonchi, F., Persson, H., Björling, G. & Elfström, M. L. (2020). Adaptation of Coping Effectiveness Training for Patients With Heart Failure and Patient-Reported Experience of the Intervention. Journal of Patient Experience, 7(6), 1054-1061
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adaptation of Coping Effectiveness Training for Patients With Heart Failure and Patient-Reported Experience of the Intervention
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Patient Experience, ISSN 2374-3735, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 1054-1061Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) often experience psychological distress, psychosocial aspects are not an integral part of their treatment and care. The aim is to describe the adaptation of Coping Effectiveness Training for patients with CHF and the participants? reported experiences. The intervention workbook and manual were translated into Swedish and adapted for patients with CHF. Patient-reported experience from 33 of 35 participants, that had completed the psychosocial intervention, was measured with an evaluation form consisting of closed and open-ended questions. Most participants thought they benefited from the intervention, were pleased with the structure and did not want to add anything to the program. The benefits experienced were learning how to cope with the illness and meeting other people to share and discuss experiences. There was a variation concerning the group process of how much direction should be given during the discussions. Overall, unique data from patient-reported experience measure showed that the participants were satisfied with the psychosocial intervention, applied for the first time to patients with CHF.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2020
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-3502 (URN)10.1177/2374373520916012 (DOI)33457545 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung Foundation
Note

This study was supported by the Swedish Heart and Lung Association, Solstickan foundation, Department of Cardiology Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, Karolinska Institutet Department of Clinical Sciences Danderyd Hospital, Stockholm County Council (ALF), Sophiahemmet Research Foundation, and Mats Kleberg Foundation.

Available from: 2020-11-16 Created: 2020-11-16 Last updated: 2021-01-26Bibliographically approved
Solberg, Ø., Vaez, M., Johnson-Singh, C. M. & Saboonchi, F. (2020). Asylum-seekers' psychosocial situation: A diathesis for post-migratory stress and mental health disorders?. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 130, Article ID 109914.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Asylum-seekers' psychosocial situation: A diathesis for post-migratory stress and mental health disorders?
2020 (English)In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, ISSN 0022-3999, E-ISSN 1879-1360, Vol. 130, article id 109914Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: While flight experiences of refugees and asylum-seekers might differ profoundly, previous research has, to a large degree, not differentiated between these forcibly displaced groups. Furthermore, research has mainly focused on post-migratory stress measured after resettlement. The aim of this study was therefore to chart mental health disorders and the associations between mental health and early post-migratory stress among asylum-seekers.

METHOD: Using a cross sectional survey design, data collection was conducted from 2016 to 2018, in three large asylum-seekers' housing facilities located in Sweden.

RESULTS: In total 455 asylum-seekers from Afghanistan, Eritrea, Iraq, Somalia and Syria responded to the questionnaire. The most prevalent type of mental health disorder was depression (67.9%) followed by posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (60.7%), and anxiety (59.3%). More men than women reported mental health disorders particularly with regard to anxiety and PTSD, and respondents with the lowest level of education (≤9 years) reported the highest levels of mental health problems. Associations between mental health disorders and post-migratory stress revealed that three post-migratory stressors were consistently the strongest indicators of mental health disorders.

CONCLUSIONS: Compared to previous research within populations of refugees who have received formal refugee status or resident permits, the prevalences of mental health disorders reported in the present study were substantially larger and the associations between post-migratory stressors and mental health disorders appears to be substantially stronger for asylum-seekers. This might suggest that the asylum-seekers' psychosocial situation becomes a diathesis or predisposition that interacts with early post-migratory stressors, in turn having detrimental effects on mental health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Anxiety, Asylum-seekers, Depression, PTSD, Post-migratory stress
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-3131 (URN)10.1016/j.jpsychores.2019.109914 (DOI)31935528 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-07194
Note

Corrigendum: Solberg, Ø., Vaez, M., Johnson-Singh, C. M., & Saboonchi, F. (2020). Corrigendum to ‘Asylum-seekers’ psychosocial situation: A diathesis for post-migratory stress and mental health disorders?’ [Journal of Psychosomatic Research 130 (2020) 109914]. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 138, 110254. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychores.2020.110254

Available from: 2020-01-24 Created: 2020-01-24 Last updated: 2020-12-21Bibliographically approved
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