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Ekstrand, P., Tegnestedt, C., Schuster, M., Eriksson, H., Hägg Martinell, A. & Larsen, J. (2023). The meaning of health among newly arrived immigrants: A qualitative study from stakeholders’ perspectives. Nordic journal of nursing research, 43(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The meaning of health among newly arrived immigrants: A qualitative study from stakeholders’ perspectives
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2023 (English)In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 43, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Good health is a prerequisite for individuals to function in everyday life. The same applies to newly arrived immigrants, where good health is crucial for successful establishment. The aim of this study was to describe stakeholders’ experiences of how newly arrived immigrants’ health affects their opportunities to establish themselves in society. The study had a qualitative design where open-ended questions were analysed following Braun and Clarke’s guidelines for conducting a qualitative thematic analysis. The results consist of three themes: Mental health problems, disabilities, and tormenting concerns about absent family members; A precarious life situation related to housing, education, and income; and Deficiencies in responding to health challenges in organisations and in society. Stakeholders face health problems among newly arrived immigrants that they do not have the right skills to deal with. We argue for the presence of nurses in organisations working with newly arrived immigrants, and that nurses’ competence is necessary to capture their needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
health, newly arrived immigrants, social participation, stakeholders, thematic qualitative analysis
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-4253 (URN)10.1177/20571585221083525 (DOI)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-07194
Available from: 2022-04-29 Created: 2022-04-29 Last updated: 2024-01-09Bibliographically approved
Schuster, M., Kraft, M., Hägg Martinell, A., Eriksson, H., Larsen, J. & Ekstrand, P. (2022). Challenges and Barriers to the Social Integration of Newly Arrived Immigrants in Sweden. Journal of Identity and Migration Studies, 16(1), 22-39
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Challenges and Barriers to the Social Integration of Newly Arrived Immigrants in Sweden
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Identity and Migration Studies, E-ISSN 1843-5610, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 22-39Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sweden, like many other European countries, has received a large number of immigrants in the past few years. To tackle the challenge connected with this, a policy for integration including an establishment programme was adopted by the Swedish Government which speeded up the introduction of newly arrived immigrants into the labour market and social life. The implementation of the programme is performed by various stakeholders in the fields of the labour market, language education and non-governmental organisations.The aim of this study was to investigate challenges and barriers to integration from the perspective of stakeholders’ experiences of encounters with newly arrived immigrants. The study used open-ended data collected in a Delphi project targeting civil servants and volunteers working within the policy establishment programme, and a thematic analysis was conducted. The results indicate that focus on organisational structures, issues concerning resources and competence, and a more holistic approach to new arrivals’ existential situationare key areas to address to move towards successful integration.

Keywords
integration, core domains of integration, newly arrived immigrants, stakeholders, thematic analysis
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-4271 (URN)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016–07194
Available from: 2022-05-28 Created: 2022-05-28 Last updated: 2023-10-04Bibliographically approved
Chatchumni, M., Eriksson, H. & Mazaheri, M. (2022). Core components of an effective pain management education programme for surgical nurses: A Delphi study. International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, 17(1), Article ID 2110672.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Core components of an effective pain management education programme for surgical nurses: A Delphi study
2022 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 2110672Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The critical reason for this study is the inadequate training received by surgical nurses in acute and chronic pain management nursing services for patients. Purpose This study aimed to describe the core components of an effective pain management education programme (PMEP) for surgical nurses in Thailand. Methods A three-round Delphi method was used. A panel of 40 experts advised regarding the essential components of an effective PMEP for surgical nurses. Results The core components of a PMEP were derived from experts' panel consensus: (i) multidisciplinary collaboration, (ii) acquisition of innovative knowledge and training by healthcare teams, and (iii) consideration of individual differences when delivering pain management services. To enhance their pain management practices, nurses should adopt multimodal pain approaches that involve family roles and engage in active patient listening. Conclusions The PMEP designed in this study, which adheres to international nursing training standards, promotes the competency of professional nurses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
Delphi method, nurse education, pain management education programs, Post-operative pain
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-4373 (URN)10.1080/17482631.2022.2110672 (DOI)000842634200001 ()35976037 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-09-02 Created: 2022-09-02 Last updated: 2022-11-30Bibliographically approved
van Eggermont Arwidson, C., Holmgren, J., Gottberg, K., Tinghög, P. & Eriksson, H. (2022). Living a frozen life: a qualitative study on asylum seekers’ experiences and care practices at accommodation centers in Sweden. Conflict and Health, 16(1), Article ID 47.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Living a frozen life: a qualitative study on asylum seekers’ experiences and care practices at accommodation centers in Sweden
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2022 (English)In: Conflict and Health, ISSN 1752-1505, E-ISSN 1752-1505, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 47Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Forced migrants fleeing conflict and violence face a high risk of mental health problems due to experiences before displacement, perilous journeys, and conditions in the new host societies. Asylum seekers seem to be in particularly vulnerable situations, indicated by higher prevalence rates of mental health problems compared to resettled refugees. Asylum seekers’ mental health is highly influenced by the conditions they face in host countries while awaiting a decision on their case. In Sweden, 40% of asylum seekers reside in state-provided accommodation centers during the asylum process. Collective accommodation centers for asylum seekers have been said to impose restrictive social conditions and to be associated with poorer mental health outcomes than other housing forms (e.g., self-organized housing). However, there seems to be a scarcity of qualitative studies exploring the experiences of asylum seekers in different contexts. The aim of this study was therefore to explore the experiences of asylum seekers and how they manage their mental wellbeing while living at accommodation centers in Sweden.

Methods: Fourteen semi-structured interviews with asylum seekers were conducted at two accommodation centers in Sweden. Participants were recruited using purposeful sampling and represented a diverse group of asylum seekers regarding age, background, and gender. The data was analyzed using content analysis.

Results: Three overarching categories were identified; 1) Frozen life, 2) Constant worrying and “overthinking”, and 3) Distractions and peer support. Participants experienced a state of being that could be characterized as a frozen life, which was associated with intense feelings of psychological distress, mostly described as manifesting itself in consuming patterns of ruminative thoughts, for instance overthinking and constant worrying. However, despite high levels of distress, participants demonstrated agency in managing negative mental health outcomes through self-care practices, peer support, and the development of care practices in caring for others in need.

Conclusion: This study offers new insights into the everyday challenges that asylum seekers at accommodation centers face. Furthermore, it offers valuable observations of how asylum seekers at accommodation centers cope through self-care practices, peer support, and care practices in caring for peers in need. In order to enable sustainable and empowering support, mental health and psychosocial support services must identify and address both challenges and strengths, be grounded in the lived reality of asylum seekers, and build on existing resources. Moreover, further policy work needs to be done to enable faster asylum processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2022
Keywords
Accommodation centers, Asylum seekers, Care practices, Mental health, Peer support, Qualitative study, Wellbeing
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-4377 (URN)10.1186/s13031-022-00480-y (DOI)36071462 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Red Cross University
Available from: 2022-09-13 Created: 2022-09-13 Last updated: 2022-09-13Bibliographically approved
Stålberg, A. & Eriksson, H. (2022). Perceptions and Implementation of a Child Perspective among Professionals Working with Vulnerable Children who Have Experienced War and Crises. Child Care in Practice
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions and Implementation of a Child Perspective among Professionals Working with Vulnerable Children who Have Experienced War and Crises
2022 (English)In: Child Care in Practice, ISSN 1357-5279, E-ISSN 1476-489XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The child perspective, i.e. an adult understanding and viewing of a child, is frequently being discussed. However, it is open to individual interpretation as the concept is only vaguely defined. This paper focuses on factors characterising the child perspective held by adults in an organisation which treats and supports adults and children who endure mental illness as a result of war, torture, and/or life as refugees. A cross-sectional descriptive design involving qualitative data was used. Data were gathered at the Health and care department, Swedish Red Cross, through open-ended questions in a web-based questionnaire answered by 69 employees. Additionally, ten semi-structured interviews were conducted with key individuals who represented a variety of professional functions within the department. The data were combined to form a united data set used for analysis. A thematic analysis was undertaken, based on the descriptions by Braun and Clarke, and three major themes emerged. Two of these described the professionals’ perceptions in terms of a child perspective. The first, Considering the child as an individual, focused on how a child perspective encouraged the employees to create a friendly atmosphere and to seek out children’s perspectives. The second, Acknowledging the child’s rights, highlighted a view of the child perspective as involving the safeguarding of children and the provision of “voice”. The third theme, Ambiguity in implementation, described the operationalisation of the child perspective in daily work, illustrating both favourable and problematic factors. To conclude, the understanding gained by this paper could be used to raise awareness of, concretise and operationalise a child perspective in other organisations in which adults encounter children. Likewise, this understanding could be used for ongoing research, knowledge development and further discussions in terms of child-focused work and rights-related initiatives involving children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
Child perspective, adult perspective, implementation in daily work, child’s rights perspective
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-4368 (URN)10.1080/13575279.2022.2095983 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Red Cross
Available from: 2022-08-10 Created: 2022-08-10 Last updated: 2022-08-11Bibliographically approved
Larsen, J., Eriksson, H. & Hägg Martinell, A. (2021). A Scoping Review of Delphi Studies Concerning Social Participation of Refugees in Health Services. JAMK Journal of Health and Social Studies, e1-e10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Scoping Review of Delphi Studies Concerning Social Participation of Refugees in Health Services
2021 (English)In: JAMK Journal of Health and Social Studies, ISSN 2490-029X, p. e1-e10Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The ability to appropriately attend to refugee health needs in the countries that are receiving them is an enormous institutional challenge. The varying practicalities of administering refugee health services can affect a refugee’s mental health outcome during the adjustment period to their new home country. This is a report on a study undertaken to overview Delphi method approaches used to investigate the consensus by experts on the issue of refugees’ social participation in health services. The review was conducted from March to December 2018 by two evaluators utilizing a systematic search strategy in presently available electronic databases. Only Delphi studies concerning forced adult refugee’s social participation in health services were included, while studies that focused on children, minorities, immigrants, migrants, asylum seekers, etc., as well as studies that did not utilize the Delphi technique, were excluded. Ten peer-reviewed articles were included in the final charting of the data. The results show that Delphi approaches regarding refugee social participation have focused on important factors important for providing quality health care, health care priorities, barriers preventing social participation, and research priorities. The experts make clear that bureaucratic procedures, cross-cultural communication and empowerment, be taken into consideration when creating policies, in practice and in research. The conclusion is that by emphasizing the tacit knowledge of experts, the Delphi method can contribute to a deeper understanding of policy priorities and responsive health services.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Jyväskylä: JAMK University of Applied Sciences, 2021
Keywords
Delphi Method; Health Participation; Refugees; Scoping Review
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-3763 (URN)
Available from: 2021-01-25 Created: 2021-01-25 Last updated: 2021-01-26Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, H. (2021). Capturing the New Digital Normal: UtilizingNethnography in Health-Related Research. In: The 6th RSU International Research Conference On Sciences And Technology: . Paper presented at The 6th International Conference On Social Sciences, Humanity, Education, Management And Arts. Bangkok, Thailand, 6
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Capturing the New Digital Normal: UtilizingNethnography in Health-Related Research
2021 (English)In: The 6th RSU International Research Conference On Sciences And Technology, Bangkok, Thailand, 2021, Vol. 6Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Social media has developed dramatically over the past decade and has emerged as one of themost widely used places for human interaction. Furthermore, the coronavirus pandemic hasaffected the way we communicate, and people spend more time on mediated and social mediaplatforms, also in relation to health concerns. Social media has therefore become an integral partof our daily lives with 3. 8 billion people worldwide using these complex social systems ofinformation.As these social systems of sharing information are becoming one of the main sources of healthinformation, a shift in the relation between health-seekers and health professionals is becoming afact. Health professionals and the institutions they worked in are no longer the first authoritiespeople reach out to when they want information on their health concerns. Social media resourcesnot only enable people to gather information for themselves and on their own health issues, butit also, more importantly, allows people to make sense of their experiences and to become selfperceived, self-lived “experts” on their own conditions.This paradigmatic changes in how we live our lives, moving from analog to digital resources andwithin this, an emerging of new experts in relation to health, is important to capture.Netnography is a qualitative method developed over the past 25 years designed to study socialmedia and how people interact with and within it. In this presentation the use of netnography willbe addressed as an opportunity to gain increased insight regarding health interactions in theseplatforms. A few basic principles and approaches in netnographic studies will be explained.Some examples of results covering over a decade of work with netnography will be presented.The presentation provides some guidance on potential paths towards a range of futurenetnographic inquiries to discuss and elaborate upon.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bangkok, Thailand: , 2021
Keywords
Health research, Netnography, Qualitative methods, Social media
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-4004 (URN)
Conference
The 6th International Conference On Social Sciences, Humanity, Education, Management And Arts
Available from: 2021-05-03 Created: 2021-05-03 Last updated: 2021-05-04Bibliographically approved
Jordal, M., Eriksson, H., Salzmann-Erikson, M. & Mazaheri, M. (2021). Escorting Students into Responsibility and Autonomy (ESRA): A Model for Supervising Degree Project. Advances in Medical Education and Practice, 12, 1165-1173
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Escorting Students into Responsibility and Autonomy (ESRA): A Model for Supervising Degree Project
2021 (English)In: Advances in Medical Education and Practice, E-ISSN 1179-7258, Vol. 12, p. 1165-1173Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Several models for how to support students and provide them with the skills needed to write their degree projects have been proposed. However, few attempts have been made to present a general model for students’ academic work based on reasoning and communication skills rather than memorizing and mimicking their supervisors during their independent degree project.Objective: In the present paper, we propose a well-structured model that assists supervisors in promoting students’ responsibility and autonomy, while at the same time maintaining a high level of support.Presentation: We present a step-by-step protocol based on a partnership model with a contractual style that focuses on students’ academic work with their own texts through a process of alternating between abstract and concrete writing. This protocol, which is called the ESRA (Escorting the Students into Responsibility and Autonomy) model, can be utilized regardless of the content, specific aim and scope of the individual student’s degree project.Discussion and Conclusions: We argue that this model promotes high levels of engagement and assumption of responsibility among students, while also offering a feasible structure for ensuring the steps to empowerment and autonomy. Use of the ESRA model is suitable when a constructive interaction between students and supervisors is desirable as a tool to achieve the learning outcomes of the degree project. Thus, the proposed model is one step toward giving a new generation of nurses the skills and ability they need to adapt in the changing world of the 21st century and to make promoting health a core mission of their profession.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dovepress, 2021
Keywords
learning, nursing education, peer learning, supervision, writing
National Category
Didactics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-4108 (URN)10.2147/AMEP.S307169 (DOI)34675743 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85119598110 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-10-07 Created: 2021-10-07 Last updated: 2024-01-11Bibliographically approved
Salzmann-Erikson, M. & Eriksson, H. (2021). Netnography in the Healthcare and nursing sector (1ed.). In: Robert V. Kozinets and Rossella Gambetti (Ed.), Netnography Unlimited: Understanding technoculture Using Qualitative Social Media Research (pp. 71-82). New York: Taylor & Francis Group
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Netnography in the Healthcare and nursing sector
2021 (English)In: Netnography Unlimited: Understanding technoculture Using Qualitative Social Media Research / [ed] Robert V. Kozinets and Rossella Gambetti, New York: Taylor & Francis Group, 2021, 1, p. 71-82Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Taylor & Francis Group, 2021 Edition: 1
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-3677 (URN)9780367431426 (ISBN)
Available from: 2020-12-28 Created: 2020-12-28 Last updated: 2020-12-28Bibliographically approved
Hägg Martinell, A., Eriksson, H., Ekstrand, P., Schuster, M. & Larsen, J. (2021). Social Participation as Reported by Civil Servants and Volunteers Working with Newly Arrived Immigrants in Sweden: Qualitative Data from a Delphi Study. Journal of Identity and Migration Studies, 15(1), 98-114
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social Participation as Reported by Civil Servants and Volunteers Working with Newly Arrived Immigrants in Sweden: Qualitative Data from a Delphi Study
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2021 (English)In: Journal of Identity and Migration Studies, E-ISSN 1843-5610, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 98-114Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Primary health prevention regarding social participation for newly arrivedimmigrants is needed to address challenges when responding to the needs of suchimmigrants in their new and vulnerable situation. The aim of this study was to describe socialparticipation as reported by civil servants and volunteers working with newly arrivedimmigrants in Sweden. Open-ended data collected in a Delphi project targeting civil servantsand volunteers working within the policy establishment programme was used. Qualitativecontent analysis was conducted. The findings show that several interacting factors contributeto resources that create perquisites for “going native in the community” and “being part ofeveryday life” as points of perquisites for how civil servants and volunteers elaborate onsocial participation for newly arrived immigrants. A focus on the “here and now” and avoidingmeasures that “put life on hold” are two points of aspects that generate possibilities forpromoting social participation in health services.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oradea: Research Centre on Identity and Migration Issues, University of Oradea, Romania, 2021
Keywords
Health promotion, Health services, Newley arrived immigrants, Qualitativecontent analysis, Refugees, Social participation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-4012 (URN)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2021-05-24 Created: 2021-05-24 Last updated: 2023-10-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0335-3472

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