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Larsen, Joacim, MedDrORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0622-7794
Publications (10 of 27) Show all publications
Hägg Martinell, A., Tegnestedt, C. & Larsen, J. (2020). Nurse Students’ Thoughts on a Sustainable Professional Life as Nurses: A Qualitative Study. Advances in Medical Education and Practice, 11, 295-303
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurse Students’ Thoughts on a Sustainable Professional Life as Nurses: A Qualitative Study
2020 (English)In: Advances in Medical Education and Practice, ISSN 1179-7258, E-ISSN 1179-7258, Vol. 11, p. 295-303Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: In a global context of an increasing and aging population, along with environmental changes, nurses play an important role in relieving suffering among vulnerable people and groups in society. Sustainability in nursing contributes to sustainable development through providing an environment that is not detrimental to/protects present and future generations′ opportunities for good health. There is a global shortage of nurses, and it has been shown that, locally, every fifth newly graduated nurse considers leaving their new profession five years after graduation. The aim was to describe how nursing students’ thought about a sustainable professional life as nurses before their graduation.

Materials and Methods: A qualitative design with a written data set was used, and a thematic analysis was performed. One hundred five students (80 women and 25 men) in semester six out of six of the nursing education program participated.

Results: The analysis resulted in three themes: 1) to have an ethical foundation that guides the individual nurse in protecting the nursing care and developing the nursing care for their patients; 2) to be in a listening, reflexive and supportive workplace enabling a professional nurse to continuously grow and learn and 3) to be a proud professional nurse with integrity, not risking with their own health or personal professional development.

Conclusion: The nursing students describe their thoughts on the requirements for having a sustainable professional life as nurses as having a strong inner ethical compass to help guide, protect and develop the nursing care for the patients. In addition, it requires a workplace with a reflexive and supporting culture. However, the nursing students also put their own health and the opportunities for professional growth at the top of their priorities, and if these conditions are lacking, they will switch to another workplace.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dove Press, 2020
Keywords
nurse students, sustainability, professional life, thematic analysis
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-3373 (URN)10.2147/AMEP.S245877 (DOI)32346320 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-04-16 Created: 2020-04-16 Last updated: 2020-05-07Bibliographically approved
Bergkvist, K., Larsen, J., Johansson, U.-B., Mattsson, J. & Fossum, B. (2018). Family members' life situation and experiences of different caring organisations during allogeneic haematopoietic stem cells transplantation: A qualitative study. European Journal of Cancer Care, 7(1), Article ID e12610.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family members' life situation and experiences of different caring organisations during allogeneic haematopoietic stem cells transplantation: A qualitative study
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2018 (English)In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 7, no 1, article id e12610Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to describe family members' life situation and experiences of care in two different care settings, the patient's home or in hospital during the acute post-transplantation phase after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 14 family members (seven women and seven men). An inductive qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data. The majority of the family members' (n = 10) had experiences from home care. The findings show the family members' voice of the uncertainty in different ways, related with the unknown prognosis of the HSCT, presented as Being me being us in an uncertain time. The data are classified into; To meet a caring organisation, To be in different care settings, To be a family member and To have a caring relationship. Positive experiences such as freedom and security from home care were identified. The competence and support from the healthcare professionals was profound. Different strategies such as adjusting, having hope and live in the present used to balance to live in an uncertain time. The healthcare professionals need to identify psychosocial problems, and integrate the psychosocial support for the family to alleviate or decrease anxiety during HSCT, regardless of the care setting.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-2308 (URN)10.1111/ecc.12610 (DOI)27859940 (PubMedID)
Note

This study was funded and supported by grants from Sophiahemmet University, the Swedish Blood Cancer Society, and the Swedish Nursing Society.

Available from: 2016-11-25 Created: 2016-11-25 Last updated: 2018-02-14Bibliographically approved
Vikdahl, L., Gunnarsson, D., Larsen, J., Ståhle, G. & Saboonchi, F. (2018). Mångfald och hälsa: En kartläggning av vilka kunskapsbehov som finns hos några samhällsaktörer i Södertörnregionen gällande mångfald och hälsa, med fokus på nyanländas etablering.. Huddinge: Flemingsberg Science
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mångfald och hälsa: En kartläggning av vilka kunskapsbehov som finns hos några samhällsaktörer i Södertörnregionen gällande mångfald och hälsa, med fokus på nyanländas etablering.
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2018 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Huddinge: Flemingsberg Science, 2018. p. 34
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-2738 (URN)
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Bergkvist, K., Fossum, B., Johansson, U.-B., Mattsson, J. & Larsen, J. (2018). Patients' experiences of different care settings and a new life situation after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. European Journal of Cancer Care, 27(1), Article ID e12672.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' experiences of different care settings and a new life situation after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation
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2018 (English)In: European Journal of Cancer Care, ISSN 0961-5423, E-ISSN 1365-2354, Vol. 27, no 1, article id e12672Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Over the past 20 years, considerable healthcare resources have shifted from an inpatient to an outpatient setting. To be in an outpatient setting or at home after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) has been shown to be medically safe and beneficial to the patient. In this study we describe patients' experiences of different care settings (hospital or home) and a new life situation during the acute post-transplant phase after HSCT. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 patients (six women and nine men) 29-120 days after HSCT. An inductive qualitative content analysis was performed to analyse the data. The analysis resulted in four categories: To be in a safe place, To have a supportive network, My way of taking control, and My uncertain return to normality. The findings showed that patients undergoing HSCT felt medically safe regardless of the care setting. The importance of a supportive network (i.e. the healthcare team, family and friends) was evident for all patients. Both emotional and problem-focused strategies were used to cope with an uncertain future. Being at home had some positive advantages, including freedom, having the potential for more physical activity, and being with family members. The study highlights some key areas thought to provide more personalised care after HSCT.

Keywords
acute post-transplant phase, allogeneic stem cell transplantation, content analysis, home care, hospital care, patient experiences
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-2342 (URN)10.1111/ecc.12672 (DOI)28252234 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-03-03 Created: 2017-03-03 Last updated: 2018-02-14Bibliographically approved
Larsen, J., Sigvardsdotter, E., Silow Kallenberg, K. & Eriksson, H. (2018). The Delphi method as a way to explore underresearched areas in nursing: - refugee's health and social participation. In: : . Paper presented at Third Nordic Conference in Nursing Research, Oslo, June 13-15, 2018..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Delphi method as a way to explore underresearched areas in nursing: - refugee's health and social participation
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: The Delphi method developed in the 1950s in the US-Army as a way to forecast the probability of nuclear weapons usage in war by consulting "experts". From this origin the Delphi method successfully spread in dierent academic disciplines during the late 1900 to become one important method for access "expert consensus" in situations where no other evidence exist and furthermore to provide a valuable tool in the investigation of "expert opinion" and may thereby help to guide future policy directives in an era such as nursing. Objective: The aim of this presentation is to describe the possibilities of using this approach to explore under-researched areas in nursing using conclusion drawn from a scoping review of Delphi studies on refugee's health and social participation. Method: Scoping review Results: The ndings show that health workers; nurse’s, physicians, civil servants have a tremendous impact on health outcomes that occur for refugees during their adjustment to a new life and that their interpretation and implementing policies is important to consider when elaborating on health and resources of health. Conclusion and implication for practice: To conclude, emphasizing the tacit knowledge of experts the ndings show that this type of approaches can serve as a method to both investigate and establish a consensus among nurses or in areas of nursing research where evidence is lacking. Delphi method is a tool that can provide valuable insight regarding nursing knowledge that is not possible to monitor in any other way and can become more important in nursing research in the future.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-2603 (URN)
Conference
Third Nordic Conference in Nursing Research, Oslo, June 13-15, 2018.
Projects
MRSR
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2016-07194
Available from: 2018-07-13 Created: 2018-07-13 Last updated: 2018-07-16Bibliographically approved
Bergkvist, K., Larsen, J., Johansson, U.-B. & Fossum, B. (2016). Family members’ experiences of different caring organizations during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells transplantation: A qualitative interview study. Paper presented at 42nd Annual Meeting of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Valencia, Spain, 3–6 April 2016, The Nurses Group Poster Session. Bone Marrow Transplantation, 51(Suppl 1), S520-S520
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family members’ experiences of different caring organizations during allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells transplantation: A qualitative interview study
2016 (English)In: Bone Marrow Transplantation, ISSN 0268-3369, E-ISSN 1476-5365, Vol. 51, no Suppl 1, p. S520-S520Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-2231 (URN)10.1038/bmt.2016.51 (DOI)26999541 (PubMedID)
Conference
42nd Annual Meeting of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Valencia, Spain, 3–6 April 2016, The Nurses Group Poster Session
Available from: 2016-05-13 Created: 2016-05-13 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Bergkvist, K., Fossum, B., Johansson, U.-B., Mattsson, J. & Larsen, J. (2016). Hospital care or home care after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: patients’ experiences of care and daily life during the early phase. Paper presented at 42nd Annual Meeting of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Valencia, Spain, 3–6 April 2016, The Nurses Group Oral Sessions. Bone Marrow Transplantation, 51(Suppl 1), S518-S519
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hospital care or home care after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: patients’ experiences of care and daily life during the early phase
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2016 (English)In: Bone Marrow Transplantation, ISSN 0268-3369, E-ISSN 1476-5365, Vol. 51, no Suppl 1, p. S518-S519Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-2230 (URN)10.1038/bmt.2016.50 (DOI)26999540 (PubMedID)
Conference
42nd Annual Meeting of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Valencia, Spain, 3–6 April 2016, The Nurses Group Oral Sessions
Note

Available from: 2016-05-12 Created: 2016-05-12 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Bergkvist, K., Winterling, J., Johansson, E., Johansson, U.-B., Svahn, B.-M., Remberger, M., . . . Larsen, J. (2015). General health, symptom occurrence, and self-efficacy in adult survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic stemcell transplantation: a cross-sectional comparison between hospital care and home care. Supportive Care in Cancer, 23(5), 1273-1283
Open this publication in new window or tab >>General health, symptom occurrence, and self-efficacy in adult survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic stemcell transplantation: a cross-sectional comparison between hospital care and home care
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2015 (English)In: Supportive Care in Cancer, ISSN 0941-4355, E-ISSN 1433-7339, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 1273-1283Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Earlier studies have shown that home care during the neutropenic phase after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is medically safe, with positive outcomes. However, there have been few results on long-term outcomes after home care. The aims of this study were to compare general health, symptom occurrence, and self-efficacy in adult survivors who received either home care or hospital care during the early neutropenic phase after allo-HSCT and to investigate whether demographic or medical variables were associated with general health or symptom occurrence in this patient population.

METHODS: In a cross-sectional survey, 117 patients (hospital care: n = 78; home care: n = 39) rated their general health (SF-36), symptom occurrence (SFID-SCT, HADS), and self-efficacy (GSE) at a median of 5 (1-11) years post-HSCT.

RESULTS: No differences were found regarding general health, symptom occurrence, or self-efficacy between groups. The majority of patients in both hospital care (77 %) and home care (78 %) rated their general health as "good" with a median of 14 (0-36) current symptoms. Symptoms of fatigue and sexual problems were among the most common. Poor general health was associated with acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), low self-efficacy, and cord blood stem cells. A high symptom occurrence was associated with female gender, acute GVHD, and low self-efficacy.

CONCLUSIONS: No long-term differences in general health and symptom occurrence were observed between home care and hospital care. Thus, home care is an alternative treatment method for patients who for various reasons prefer this treatment option. We therefore encourage other centers to offer home care to patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2015
Keywords
Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, General health, Symptom occurrence, Self-efficacy, Home care, Hospital care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-1411 (URN)10.1007/s00520-014-2476-9 (DOI)25322970 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-01-29 Created: 2015-01-29 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Bergkvist, K., Larsen, J., Johansson, U.-B., Mattsson, J. & Svahn, B.-M. (2013). Hospital care or home care after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Patients’ experiences of care and support. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 17(4), 389-395
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hospital care or home care after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Patients’ experiences of care and support
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2013 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 389-395Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: Treatment at home during the pancytopenic phase after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been an option for patients at our center since 1998. Earlier studies have shown that home care is safe and has medical advantages. In this study, we present patients’ experiences of care and support while being treated in hospital or at home during the acute post-transplantation phase.

Method: Patients (n ¼ 41, 22 in hospital care and 19 in home care) answered the SAUC questionnaire at discharge (when home, or from hospital). Both statistical analysis and deductive content analysis were used.

Results: The patients were highly satisfied with the care and support during the acute posttransplantation phase. Patients in home care were found to be more satisfied with care in general than patients in hospital care. The importance of safety, empathy, and encouragement from healthcare staff were expressed regardless of where care was given. Patients also felt that receipt of continuous, updated information during treatment was important and they had a strong belief in HSCT but were uncertain of the future regarding recovery.

Conclusions: The main findings of this study were that in comparison to hospital care, home care does not appear to have a significant negative effect on patients’ experiences of care and support during the acute post-transplantation phase. In addition patients in home care felt safe, seen as a person and encouragement seem to empower the patients at home. Thus, this study may encourage other transplantation centers to provide home care if the patients want it.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keywords
Allogeneic stem cell transplantation, Hospital care, Home care, Patient satisfaction, Pancytopenic phase, Mixed methods analysis
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-487 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2012.12.004 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-02-18 Created: 2013-02-18 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Kullberg, A., Larsen, J. & Sharp, L. (2013). ‘Why is there another person's name on my infusion bag?’ Patient safety in chemotherapy care: A review of the literature. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 17(2), 228-235
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Why is there another person's name on my infusion bag?’ Patient safety in chemotherapy care: A review of the literature
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 228-235Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

Approximately 10% of all patients is in some way harmed by the health care system. Risk factors have been identified and patients with cancer are at high risk due to the seriousness of the disease, co-morbidity, often old age, high risk treatments such as chemo and radiotherapy. Therefore, a closer look on safety for patients undergoing chemotherapy is needed. The aim of this study was to identify and evaluate interventions for improved patientsafety in chemotherapy care.

Method

We undertook a review of the available evidence regarding interventions to improve patientsafety in relation to chemotherapy care.

Results

We found 12 studies describing the following interventions; 1) Computerized Prescription Order Entry (CPOE), 2) Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) and Lean Sigma, 3) Error reporting and surveillance systems, 4) Administration Checklist and 5) Education for nurses. Even if all five interventions showed positive effects in patientsafety, the evidence level is rather weak due to design, sample size and the difficulties involved measuring patient safety issues.

Conclusions

Three studies with fairly high evidence level showed that computerized chemotherapy prescriptions were significantly safer than manual prescriptions and could therefore be recommended. For the other remaining interventions, more research is needed to assess the effect on improved patient safety in chemotherapy care. There is a need for more rigorous studies with sophisticated design for generating evidence in the field.

Keywords
patient safety, chemotherapy, oncology, drug administration, literature review
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-394 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2012.07.005 (DOI)22898657 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-09-28 Created: 2012-09-27 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0622-7794

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Joacim Larsen