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Publications (10 of 19) Show all publications
Thermaenius, J., Schandl, A. & Prignitz Sluys, K. (2018). Development and initial validation of the Swedish Family Satisfaction Intensive Care Questionnaire (SFS-ICQ).. Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, 50, 118-124
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development and initial validation of the Swedish Family Satisfaction Intensive Care Questionnaire (SFS-ICQ).
2018 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 50, p. 118-124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: Measuring patients satisfaction is an important part of continuous quality improvement in health care. In intensive care, family satisfaction is often used as a proxy for patient experience. At present, no suitable instrument to measure this has been fully validated in Sweden. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a questionnaire intended to evaluate families' satisfaction of quality of care in Swedish intensive care units.

METHODS: Based on literature and the modification of pertinent items in two existing North American questionnaires, a Swedish questionnaire was developed. Content validity was assessed by experts, and the cognitive method Think Aloud was used with twelve family members of intensive care patients in two different intensive care units. Data was analysed using qualitative content analysis.

FINDINGS: Seven items in the questionnaire were identified as problematic, causing eight problems concerning questioning of content and 23 concerning misunderstanding. Six of these items were changed in order to be understood the way they were intended, and one item was removed.

CONCLUSION: A family satisfaction questionnaire applicable in Swedish intensive care units has been developed and validated for respondents' understanding of the questions being asked. However, further psychometric testing should be performed when more data are available.

Keywords
Critical care, Family satisfaction, Intensive care, Proxy-reported outcomes, Qualitative research, Questionnaire development, Think Aloud
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-2600 (URN)10.1016/j.iccn.2018.05.003 (DOI)29935980 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-06-28 Created: 2018-06-28 Last updated: 2019-01-04Bibliographically approved
Bruce, M. M., Kassam-Adams, N., Rogers, M., Anderson, K. M., Prignitz Sluys, K. & Richmond, T. S. (2018). Trauma Providers' Knowledge, Views, and Practice of Trauma-Informed Care. Journal of trauma nursing : the official journal of the Society of Trauma Nurses, 25(2), 131-138
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trauma Providers' Knowledge, Views, and Practice of Trauma-Informed Care
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2018 (English)In: Journal of trauma nursing : the official journal of the Society of Trauma Nurses, ISSN 1078-7496, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 131-138Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Trauma-informed interventions have been implemented in various settings, but trauma-informed care (TIC) has not been widely incorporated into the treatment of adult patients with traumatic injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine health care provider knowledge, attitudes, practices, competence, and perceived barriers to implementation of TIC. This cross-sectional study used an anonymous web-based survey to assess attitudes, knowledge, perceived competence, and practice of TIC among trauma providers from an urban academic medical center with a regional resource trauma center. Providers (nurses, physicians, therapists [physical, occupational, respiratory]) working in trauma resuscitation, trauma critical care, and trauma care units were recruited. Descriptive statistics summarized knowledge, attitudes, practice, competence, and perceived barriers to TIC and logistic regression analyses examined factors predicting the use of TIC in practice. Of 147 participants, the majority were nurses (65%), followed by therapists (18%) and physicians (17%), with a median 3 years of experience; 75% answered the knowledge items correctly and 89% held favorable opinions about TIC. Nineteen percent rated themselves as less than "somewhat competent." All participants rated the following as significant barriers to providing basic TIC: time constraints, need of training, confusing information about TIC, and worry about retraumatizing patients. Self-rated competence was the most consistent predictor of providers' reported use of specific TIC practices. Despite some variability, providers were generally knowledgeable and held favorable views toward incorporating TIC into their practice. TIC training for trauma providers is needed and should aim to build providers' perceived competence in providing TIC.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-2565 (URN)10.1097/JTN.0000000000000356 (DOI)29521782 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-15 Created: 2018-03-15 Last updated: 2018-03-15Bibliographically approved
Bruce, M., Kassam-Adams, N., Rogers, M., Anderson, K., Prignitz Sluys, K. & Richmond, T. (2017). Trauma Providers' Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice of Trauma-Informed Care. Paper presented at Eastern Nursing Research Society: 29th Annual Scientific Sessions. Nursing Research, 66(2), E133-E134
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trauma Providers' Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice of Trauma-Informed Care
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2017 (English)In: Nursing Research, ISSN 0029-6562, E-ISSN 1538-9847, Vol. 66, no 2, p. E133-E134Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-2360 (URN)10.1097/NNR.0000000000000214 (DOI)
Conference
Eastern Nursing Research Society: 29th Annual Scientific Sessions
Available from: 2017-04-18 Created: 2017-04-18 Last updated: 2017-07-03Bibliographically approved
Prignitz Sluys, K., Shults, J. & Richmond, T. S. (2016). Health related quality of life and return to work after minor extremity injuries: A longitudinal study comparing upper versus lower extremity injuries.. Injury, 47(4), 824-831
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health related quality of life and return to work after minor extremity injuries: A longitudinal study comparing upper versus lower extremity injuries.
2016 (English)In: Injury, ISSN 0020-1383, E-ISSN 1879-0267, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 824-831Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To investigate the impact on health related quality of life (HRQL) during the first year after minor extremity injury and to determine whether there is a difference in recovery patterns and return to work between upper extremity injuries (UEI) and lower extremity injuries (LEI).

METHOD: A total of 181 adults' age 18 years or older randomly selected from patients admitted to an emergency department with minor injuries were studied. HRQL was measured using the Functional Status Questionnaire (FSQ) at 1-2 weeks, 3, 6, and 12-months post-injury. Pre-injury FSQ scores were measured retrospectively at admission. A quasi-least square (QLS) model was constructed to examine differences of FSQ scores at each measuring point for UEI and LEI.

RESULTS: Fractures of the knee/lower leg (25%) were the most frequently injured body area. Slips or falls (57%) and traffic-related events (22%) were the most common injury causes. The mean ISS was 4.2 (SD 0.86). Both groups had significant declines in the FSQ scores physical and social functioning at 1-2 weeks after injury. Patients with UEI made larger improvements in the first 3 months post-injury versus patients with LEI whose improvements extended over the first 6 months. None of the groups reached the pre-injury FSQ scores during the first post-injury year except in the subscale work performance where UEI exceeded the pre-injury scores. At 12 months post-injury, significant lower FSQ scores remained in the LEI group compared to the UEI group in intermediate activities of daily living (p=0.036, d 0.4) and work performance (p=0.004, d 0.7). The return to work at 3 months and 12 months were 76% and 88% for UEI and 58% and 77% for LEI. No significant differences were found between groups in the FSQ scale mental health and social interaction.

CONCLUSIONS: LEI had the highest impact on HRQL and return to work during the first year which exceeded the consequences of UEI. These findings contribute to the information about the consequences of injury in order to give sufficient prognostic information to patients and different stakeholders. Future investigations should aim to investigate specific minor extremity injuries and identify factors that facilitate recovery and return to work.

Keywords
Extremity; Functional status; Health-related quality of life; Injury; Lower extremity; Minor injury; Recovery; Trauma; Upper extremity; Work
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-2184 (URN)10.1016/j.injury.2016.02.019 (DOI)26965363 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-21 Created: 2016-03-21 Last updated: 2017-07-14Bibliographically approved
Prignitz Sluys, K., Lannge, M., Iselius, L. & Eriksson, L. E. (2015). Six years beyond pediatric trauma: child and parental ratings of children’s health-related quality of life in relation to parental mental health. Quality of Life Research, 24(11), 2689-2699
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Six years beyond pediatric trauma: child and parental ratings of children’s health-related quality of life in relation to parental mental health
2015 (English)In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 24, no 11, p. 2689-2699Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose

To examine the relationship between child self-report and parent proxy report of health-related quality of life (HRQL) and how parents’ mental health status relates to the HRQL ratings 6 years after minor to severe injury of the child.

Materials and methods

This cross-sectional cohort study was performed at a regional pediatric trauma center in Stockholm, Sweden. The PedsQL 4.0 versions for ages 5–7, 8–12, and 13–18 years were completed by 177 child–parent dyads 6 years after injury to the child. The parents also rated their own mental health through the mental health domain (MH) in the SF-36 Health Survey.

Results

The children’s median age was 13 years (IQR 10–16 years), 54 % were males, and the median ISS was 5 (IQR 2–9). Most of the parents were female (77 %), born in Sweden (79 %), and half had university degrees. There was no statistically significant difference between child self-report and parent proxy report in any of the PedsQL 4.0 scales or summary scales. The levels of agreement between child self-report and parent proxy reports were excellent (ICC ≥ 0.80) for all scales with the exception of emotional functioning (ICC 0.53) which also was the scale with the lowest internal consistency in child self-report (α 0.60). Multiple regression analyses showed that worse parental mental health status correlated with worse child self-report and parent proxy report of children’s HRQL.

Conclusions

Children and their parents’ reports on child’s HRQL were in agreement. Decreased mental health in parents was associated with lower scores on parent proxy reports and child self-reports of HRQL after injury. The current investigation highlights the possible relationship between parent’s mental health status and children’s HRQL long after an injury, which should be considered in future investigations and in clinical care.

Keywords
Injury, Trauma, Pediatric, Parents, PedsQL, Mental health, Depression, Health-related quality of life
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-843 (URN)10.1007/s11136-015-1002-y (DOI)26001639 (PubMedID)
Note

As manuscript in dissertation

Available from: 2014-06-11 Created: 2014-06-10 Last updated: 2017-07-14Bibliographically approved
Bell, C. & Prignitz Sluys, K. (2015). Trauma Management (3ed.). In: Aitken, L.M.; Marschall, A ; Chaboyer, W. (Ed.), ACCCN's Critical Care Nursing: . Chatswood: Elsevier
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trauma Management
2015 (English)In: ACCCN's Critical Care Nursing / [ed] Aitken, L.M.; Marschall, A ; Chaboyer, W., Chatswood: Elsevier, 2015, 3Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Chatswood: Elsevier, 2015 Edition: 3
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-1950 (URN)978-0-7295-4200-5 (ISBN)
Available from: 2015-10-13 Created: 2015-10-13 Last updated: 2015-10-14Bibliographically approved
Prignitz Sluys, K. (2014). Omvårdnadsprocessen i praktiken (2:a uppl.ed.). In: Edberg, Anna-Karin; Wijk, Helle (Ed.), Omvårdnadens grunder: Hälsa och ohälsa (pp. 151-173). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Omvårdnadsprocessen i praktiken
2014 (Swedish)In: Omvårdnadens grunder: Hälsa och ohälsa / [ed] Edberg, Anna-Karin; Wijk, Helle, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 2:a uppl., p. 151-173Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014 Edition: 2:a uppl.
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-950 (URN)9789144083551 (ISBN)
Available from: 2014-09-01 Created: 2014-09-01 Last updated: 2015-10-14Bibliographically approved
Prignitz Sluys, K. (2014). Trauma: Ett globalt folkhälsoproblem. Ventilen (1), 6-7
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Trauma: Ett globalt folkhälsoproblem
2014 (Swedish)In: Ventilen, ISSN 0348-6257, no 1, p. 6-7Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Riksföreningen för anestesi och intensivvård, 2014
Keywords
trauma
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-783 (URN)
Available from: 2014-02-25 Created: 2014-02-25 Last updated: 2015-10-14Bibliographically approved
Prignitz Sluys, K. (2014). Uppföljning av barn och vuxna efter trauma. Ventilen (1), 8-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Uppföljning av barn och vuxna efter trauma
2014 (Swedish)In: Ventilen, ISSN 0348-6257, no 1, p. 8-9Article in journal (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Riksföreningen för anestesi och intensivvård, 2014
Keywords
akutsjukvård, livskvalitet, trauma
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Anesthesiology and Intensive Care
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-784 (URN)
Available from: 2014-02-25 Created: 2014-02-25 Last updated: 2015-10-14Bibliographically approved
Prignitz Sluys, K. (2012). Adult and pediatric trauma: outcomes and health-related quality of life. (Doctoral dissertation). Stockholm: Karolinska Institutet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adult and pediatric trauma: outcomes and health-related quality of life
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Background: Trauma is the number one killer of children and young adults and the  most common cause for hospital admissions for these age-groups in Sweden. Trauma is  also one of the most common causes for hospital care and early death for older people.  In the last decades trauma care has advanced and improved short-term survival of  injured but knowledge of the long-term outcome is limited.

The overall aim of this thesis is to investigate long-term outcome and health-related  quality of life after injuries in different age groups and to identify factors associated  with outcome.

Methods: The thesis is based on four studies. In the first study patients with major  trauma were contacted 5 years after injury and HRQL was measures using the SF-36  questionnaire and compared to an age and sex-matched reference group. In the second  study data was collected on children with injuries to describe demographic and injury  characteristics and outcome. The sample in the second study was the source for the  third and fourth study. The third study measured HRQL using the PedsQL 4.0 in a  cohort of children 6 years after injury and determined the relationship within subgroups  in the cohort. The fourth study measured child HRQL in a sample of children after  injury and their parent´s and determined the relationship within scoring results and the impact of parents reported mental health status.

Results: The adult major trauma patients (n=205) reported significantly lower HRQL  scores in all eight domains compared to the reference group. A large number of patients  suffered from physical (68%) and psychological disabilities (41%) and nearly half reported the need for better follow-up after discharge from hospital. The severity of the injury did not anticipate a lower health-related quality of life. In the pediatric group  (n=432) the median injury severity score was 4 (IQR 1-9), 50% sustained head injuries  and the most severe head injuries were seen in the youngest age group. Mortality rate  was low (1%), 19% stayed in a PICU and the median length of hospital stay was two  days. In the follow-up study (n=204) the youngest children had the lowest PedsQL  scores. Children who suffered from extremity injuries had lower scores in the school  functioning compared to children with head injuries. The levels of agreement between  child self-report and parent proxy report of PedsQL 4.0 scales were excellent  (ICC≥0.80) for all scales with the exception of children´s self-reported emotional  functioning. Multiple regression analyses showed that poor parental mental health  status contributed to worse child self-report and parent proxy report of children´s  HRQL.

Conclusion: Adult major trauma patients have significant disabilities 5 years after  injury. Improved follow-up by trauma specialist teams are needed. Children´s HRQL 6  years after trauma seems to in parity or better than healthy peers. Parent´s mental health  status can possibly impact on children´s HRQL long after an injury. Further studies are  recommended to evaluate the PedsQL 4.0versions for self-report in pediatric trauma  population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Karolinska Institutet, 2012. p. 76
Keywords
Trauma, Injury, Health- related quality of life, Follow- up, Pediatric, Adolescents, SF-36, PedsQL 4, 0
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-844 (URN)978-91-7457-954-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-12-07, Henry Dunant, Teknikringen 1, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

At the time of the doctoral defense, the following papers were unpublished and had a status as follows: Paper 3: Submitted (title: Health-related quality of life of children and adolescents 6 years after pediatric trauma). Paper 4: Manuscript (title: Health-related quality of life 6 years after pediatric trauma: Impact of parental mental health on child-parent reports).

Available from: 2014-06-11 Created: 2014-06-10 Last updated: 2015-10-14Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9273-9448

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