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Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Johansson, M., Holst, G. & Ahlstrom, G. (2019). Signs In People With Intellectual Disabilities: Interviews With Managers And Staff On The Identification Process Of Dementia. Paper presented at The World Congress of the International Association for the Scientif ic Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IASSIDD) 2019, Glascow, August 6-9, 2019.. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, 63(7), 649-649
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Signs In People With Intellectual Disabilities: Interviews With Managers And Staff On The Identification Process Of Dementia
2019 (English)In: Journal of Intellectual Disability Research, ISSN 0964-2633, E-ISSN 1365-2788, Vol. 63, no 7, p. 649-649Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: An increasing number of people with intellectual disability (ID) are reaching older ages and an increased risk of dementia diseases. Staff and managers give support in daily living and can deliver information about residents' changes in behavior. The aim of the study was to explore the identification process employed by staff and managers to detect signs of suspected dementia in people with ID within intellectual disability services (ID‐services).

Methods: Twenty managers and 24 staff within ID‐service were interviewed and qualitative latent content analysis was applied.

Results: A model consisting of three themes on three levels of resources for the identification process of signs of suspected dementia emerged from the analysis. On the first level was the time and continuity in the care relationship, which is crucial for identifying and responding to changes in cognitive ability that indicate dementia. On the second level, the staff identifies deficiencies in their own knowledge, seek support from colleagues and managers within their workplace and, on the third level, outside their workplace. Staff and managers expressed needs for guidance and education from specialists in dementia and primary healthcare.

Implications: This finding indicates an urgent need for intervention research and digital support for staff in dementia care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
Intellectual disability, Older people, Signs of dementia, Qualitative study
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-3006 (URN)10.1111/jir.12651 (DOI)
Conference
The World Congress of the International Association for the Scientif ic Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (IASSIDD) 2019, Glascow, August 6-9, 2019.
Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-06Bibliographically approved
Lindvall, A., Kristensson, J., Willman, A. & Holst, G. (2016). Informal Care Provided by Family Caregivers Experiences of Older Adults With Multimorbidity. Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(8), 24-31
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Informal Care Provided by Family Caregivers Experiences of Older Adults With Multimorbidity
2016 (English)In: Journal of Gerontological Nursing, ISSN 0098-9134, E-ISSN 1938-243X, Vol. 42, no 8, p. 24-31Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Informal care given by family caregivers is an important part of the total care provided to older adults with multimorbidity. The current study aimed to describe how older adults with multimorbidity experienced care from family caregivers. Interviews were conducted with 24 participants (mean age = 86 years). Older adults with multimorbidity felt gratitude toward family caregivers for their willingness to help with everyday life and for representing their interests in contacts with health care providers. Family caregivers also had a significant impact on older adults' psychological well-being. However, the results also showed that older adults often felt they were a burden to their family caregivers and that their independence might be reduced. Older adults with multimorbidity should have the opportunity to be more involved in and have more influence over their health care so that they do not have to depend on representation by family caregivers.

Keywords
Quality-Of-Life; Multiple Chronic Conditions; Health-Care; Home; Depression; Prevalence; Morbidity; Support
National Category
Nursing Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-2615 (URN)10.3928/00989134-20160615-06 (DOI)000386651400004 ()27319404 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-11-25 Created: 2018-09-04Bibliographically approved
Hjelm, M., Holmgren, A.-C., Willman, A., Bohman, D. & Holst, G. (2015). Family members of older persons with multi-morbidity and their experiences of case managers in Sweden: an interpretive phenomenological approach. International Journal of Integrated Care, 15(Jan-Mar), Article ID e011.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Family members of older persons with multi-morbidity and their experiences of case managers in Sweden: an interpretive phenomenological approach
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2015 (English)In: International Journal of Integrated Care, ISSN 1568-4156, E-ISSN 1568-4156, Vol. 15, no Jan-Mar, article id e011Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Family members of older persons (75+) with multi-morbidity are likely to benefit from utilising case management services performed by case managers. However, research has not yet explored their experiences of case managers. Objectives: The aim of the study was to deepen the understanding of the importance of case managers to family members of older persons (75+) with multi-morbidity. Design: The study design was based on an interpretive phenomenological approach. Method: Data were collected through individual interviews with 16 family members in Sweden. The interviews were analysed by means of an interpretive phenomenological approach. Results: The findings revealed one overarching theme: “Helps to fulfil my unmet needs”, based on three sub-themes: (1) “Helps me feel secure – Experiencing a trusting relationship”, (2) “Confirms and strengthens me – Challenging my sense of being alone” and (3) “Being my personal guide – Increasing my competence”. Conclusion and discussion: The findings indicate that case managers were able to fulfil unmet needs of family members. The latter recognised the importance of case managers providing them with professional services tailored to their individual needs. The findings can contribute to the improvement of case management models not only for older persons but also for their family members.

Keywords
case management, integrated care, family members, interpretive phenomenology, multi-morbidity, older persons
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-2617 (URN)25918497 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-04 Created: 2018-09-04 Last updated: 2018-09-04Bibliographically approved
Hjelm, M., Holst, G., Willman, A., Bohman, D. & Kristensson, J. (2015). The work of case managers as experienced by older persons (75+) with multi-morbidity – a focused ethnography. BMC Geriatrics, 15, Article ID 168.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The work of case managers as experienced by older persons (75+) with multi-morbidity – a focused ethnography
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2015 (English)In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, article id 168Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Complex health systems make it difficult for older persons (75+) with multi-morbidity to achieve continuity of care. Case management could be one way to address this difficulty. Currently, there is a need to extend the knowledge regarding case management as experienced by those utilising the services, namely older persons (75+) with multi-morbidity. The study aimed to explore older persons’ (75+) with multi-morbidity experiences of case managers.

Methods

The study design was qualitative and used a focused ethnographic approach. Data was collected through individual interviews with 13 older persons and by participant observations with accompanying field notes, all conducted in 2012–2013.

Results

The data revealed four themes illustrating the older persons’ experiences of case managers:

1) Someone providing me with a trusting relationship; 2) Someone assisting me; 3) Someone who is on my side; and 4) Someone I do not need at present.

Conclusions

This study illustrates the importance of establishing trusting relationships between older persons and their case managers in order to truly provide assistance. The older persons valued the case managers acting as informed but unbiased facilitators. The findings could be of help in the development of case management interventions better designed for older persons with multi-morbidity.

Keywords
Aged, Case management, Comorbidity, Continuity of patient care, Delivery of health care, Ethnography, Intervention, Multi-morbidity, Qualitative research
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-2616 (URN)10.1186/s12877-015-0172-3 (DOI)26675288 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-12-18 Created: 2018-09-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4342-0780

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