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Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Wahlström, M., Rosenqvist, M., Medin, J., Walfridsson, U. & Rydell-Karlsson, M. (2019). MediYoga as a part of a self-management programme among patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation - a randomised study. European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>MediYoga as a part of a self-management programme among patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation - a randomised study
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2019 (English)In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation is associated with impaired health-related quality of life. Yoga has been suggested to improve health-related quality of life among patients with heart failure and hypertension.

AIM: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of MediYoga, in respect of health-related quality of life, blood pressure, heart rate, as well as N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide, among patients with symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, compared with standard therapy or relaxation.

METHODS: Patients with symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, n=132, were stratified for gender and randomised to MediYoga, a relaxation group or a control group, 44 patients per group with a 12-week follow-up. Health-related quality of life, blood pressure, heart rate and N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide were assessed.

RESULTS: After 12 weeks, there were no differences in health-related quality of life between the groups. There were improvements in Short-Form Health Survey bodily pain, general health, social function, mental health and mental component summary scores within the MediYoga group (p=0.014, p=0.037, p=0.029, p=0.030, p=0.019, respectively). No change was seen in the relaxation and control groups. Systolic blood pressure decreased in the MediYoga group (134±18 to 127±13) compared with the control group (126±17 to 127±15, p=0.041); no difference compared with the relaxation group (131±17 to 125±12). Diastolic blood pressure decreased in the MediYoga group (79±9 to 74 ±9) compared with the control group (76±9 to 79±8, p=0.005); no difference compared with the relaxation group (76±9 to 77±8). There were no differences in heart rate and N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide between the groups after 12 weeks.

CONCLUSIONS: MediYoga improves health-related quality of life and decreases blood pressure in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. MediYoga may be used as a part of a self-management programme among patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2019
Keywords
N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide, Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, blood pressure, health-related quality of life, heart rate, yoga
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-3045 (URN)10.1177/1474515119871796 (DOI)31526039 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-26 Created: 2019-09-26 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Gellerstedt, L., Medin, J., Kumlin, M. & Karlsson, M. R. (2019). Nursing care and management of patients' sleep during hospitalisation: A cross-sectional study. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 28(19-20), 3400-3407
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nursing care and management of patients' sleep during hospitalisation: A cross-sectional study
2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 28, no 19-20, p. 3400-3407Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim To explore and describe how patients' sleep is addressed at acute-care hospitals in Sweden with regard to nursing care, management and the development of knowledge in this area. Background Sleep is a basic human need and thus important for health and health maintenance. Patients describe sleeping in hospital as a stressor, and research shows that nurses tend to underestimate patients' perceived problems with sleep during hospitalisation. How do nursing staff at acute hospitals address patients' sleep and the development of knowledge in this area? Design/Method A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted based on data collected through a web survey. Head nurses, registered nurses, nursing care developers and local training supervisors at 36 randomised acute-care hospitals in Sweden were invited to participate. This study was executed and reported in accordance with SQUIRE 2.0. Results The results of the survey (53 responses from 19 wards at 15 acute-care hospitals) showed that no policy documents exist and no current training addresses sleep during hospital stay. All participants agreed that sleep should be considered a nursing topic and that it is important for hospitalised patients. Conclusion Patients' sleep during hospitalisation is undermanaged at acute-care hospitals. Nurses, health care managers and organisations face challenges if they are to achieve better outcomes. Relevance to clinical practice This study shows that nurses do consider patients' sleep important and addressing sleep as part of nursing care. Future studies in the area should focus on what kinds of support and education are needed in the clinical context.

Keywords
Cross-sectional study, Hospitalisation, Management, nursing care, patients, sleep
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-3050 (URN)10.1111/jocn.14915 (DOI)31091343 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-31 Created: 2019-10-31 Last updated: 2019-10-31Bibliographically approved
Gellerstedt, L., Medin, J., Kumlin, M. & Karlsson, M. R. (2019). Sleep as a topic in nursing education programs?: A mixed method study of syllabuses and nursing students' perceptions. Nurse Education Today, 79, 168-174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep as a topic in nursing education programs?: A mixed method study of syllabuses and nursing students' perceptions
2019 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 79, p. 168-174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Sleep is a basic human need and is considered important for maintaining health. It is even more important during illness due to its impact for example on our immune system. Nurses have an important role in identifying sleep deprivation. They are also in a unique position to promote and address sleep among patients. However, it is essential that they are provided with the appropriate knowledge during training.

Aim: To explore and describe nursing students' perceptions of preparedness to adress and support patients' sleep during hospitalization and to apply sleep-promoting interventions in a clinical context. Furthermore, the aim was to investigate if, and how, the topic of sleep is explicitly incorporated in nursing education programs.

Design: A descriptive study based on a mixed method approach.

Methods: Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from program and course syllabuses and intended learning outcomes from three universities. Twenty-one nursing students from the same universities were interviewed during their final year of education.

Results: The results of both quantitative and qualitative data consistently show that education regarding sleep and patients' sleep is limited and, in some respects, absent in the Bachelor of Science Nursing programs investigated.

Conclusion: This study indicates that education about sleep and patients' sleep in the nursing programs studied is insufficient and limited. This gap in knowledge may lead to prospective registered nurses using their own experiences instead of evidence-based knowledge when assessing, supporting and applying sleep-promoting interventions.

Keywords
Interviews, Mixed method, Nursing education, Sleep, Students' knowledge, Preparedness
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-3005 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2019.05.030 (DOI)31132729 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-06Bibliographically approved
Wahlström, M., Rydell-Karlsson, M. & Medin, J. (2018). Perceptions and experiences of MediYoga among patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: An interview study. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 41, 29-34
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions and experiences of MediYoga among patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation: An interview study
2018 (English)In: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, ISSN 0965-2299, E-ISSN 1873-6963, Vol. 41, p. 29-34Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

We investigated the perceptions and experiences of a therapeutic yoga form, MediYoga, which is evolved from Kundaliniyoga among patients with symptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF).

Design and setting

an inductive exploratory design was chosen with individual semi-structured interviews. The study was conducted with 12 participants (7 men and 5 women, average age 63.5) at a university hospital, Sweden. Informed consent was obtained from all participants. The data were analyzed using a qualitative content analysis with an inductive method and a manifest approach.

Results

Three categories were found in the analysis. In the category “A time for a sense of existence and presence”, the patients described an increased thoughtfulness and experiences of gaining access to an inner self. The category “A way of gaining well-being and increased consciousness” describes patients` feelings of relaxation and feeling of comfort, with components of mental and physical well-being. Furthermore, “Access to a tool to gain willpower and relieve symptoms” describes the perceptions from patients to obtained access to a tool for handling the emotions, such as fear and anxiety, as well as symptoms that they could struggling with between, and during, their episodes of atrial fibrillation. No adverse events were reported by the yoga group, during the study.

Conclusions

Patients with PAF described MediYoga as an accessible tool to manage emotions and symptoms related to episodes of AF. MediYoga may also assist in enhancing body awareness, whereby physical, mental and spiritual components are integrated. MediYoga may strengthen self-management among patients with PAF.

Keywords
Content analysis, MediYoga, Paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, Yoga
National Category
Nursing Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-2724 (URN)10.1016/j.ctim.2018.09.002 (DOI)30477856 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-24 Created: 2018-10-24 Last updated: 2018-11-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9512-3374

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