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Publications (4 of 4) Show all publications
Manhica, H., Berg, L., Almquist, Y. B., Rostila, M. & Hjern, A. (2019). Labour market participation among young refugees in Sweden and the potential of education: a national cohort study. Journal of Youth Studies, 22(4), 533-550
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Labour market participation among young refugees in Sweden and the potential of education: a national cohort study
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 533-550Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This register-based study examined the importance of education on labour market participation among young refugees in Sweden. The study population consisted of unaccompanied (n?=?1606) and accompanied refuges (n?=?4142), aged 23?26 years in 2006?2010, after 7 years of residence in Sweden. Native Swedish, aged 24 years (n?=?347,255) constituted the comparison population, with intercountry adoptees (n?=?6689) as an alternative reference group. Gender-stratified multinomial regression models indicated that unaccompanied and accompanied male and female young refugees had higher risks of being in insecure work force and NEET compared to native Swedes with comparable levels of education. However, young refugees and intercountry adoptees with primary education had similar risks of poor labour market outcomes. The educational differences within each group concerning the risk of being in insecure work force were comparable. With the exception of unaccompanied females, secondary education seemed to be less protective against being in NEET among young refugees compared to native Swedes and intercountry adoptees. We conclude that while young refugees face employment disadvantages, education has the potential of mitigating poor labour market outcomes in this group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-2806 (URN)10.1080/13676261.2018.1521952 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-05-08 Created: 2019-05-08 Last updated: 2019-05-08Bibliographically approved
Manhica, H., Niemi, M., Gunnarsson, D., Ståhle, G., Larsson, S. & Saboonchi, F. (2018). Social participation, mental health in refugees and asylum seekers: A scoping review. European Journal of Public Health, 28(Suppl. 4), 482-482
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social participation, mental health in refugees and asylum seekers: A scoping review
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2018 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no Suppl. 4, p. 482-482Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-2798 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/cky218.213 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-04-09 Created: 2019-04-09 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
Hjern, A., Berg, L., Arat, A., Klöfvermark, J., Manhica, H., Rostila, M., . . . Magnusson, L. (2017). Children as next of kin in Sweden. Kalmar
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children as next of kin in Sweden
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2017 (English)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Kalmar: , 2017. p. 28
Series
BSA-rapport ; 2017:2
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-2549 (URN)978-91-87731-49-5 (ISBN)
Note

This overview, ‘Children as next of kin in Sweden’ is a summary of eight reports on children as next of kin in Sweden.

Available from: 2018-02-20 Created: 2018-02-20 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
Manhica, H., Gauffin, K., Almquist, Y. B., Rostila, M., Berg, L., Rodríguez García de Cortázar, A. & Hjern, A. (2017). Hospital admissions due to alcohol related disorders among young adult refugees who arrived in Sweden as teenagers - a national cohort study. BMC Public Health, 17(1), Article ID 644.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hospital admissions due to alcohol related disorders among young adult refugees who arrived in Sweden as teenagers - a national cohort study
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2017 (English)In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 644Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Psychological distress and lack of family support may explain the mental health problems that are consistently found in young unaccompanied refugees in Western countries. Given the strong relationship between poor mental health and alcohol misuse, this study investigated hospital admissions due to alcohol related disorders among accompanied and unaccompanied young refugees who settled in Sweden as teenagers.

METHODS: The dataset used in this study was derived from a combination of different registers. Cox regression models were used to estimate the risks of hospital care due to alcohol related disorders in 15,834 accompanied and 4376 unaccompanied young refugees (2005-2012), aged 13 to 19 years old when settling in Sweden and 19 to 32 years old in December 2004. These young refugees were divided into regions with largely similar attitudes toward alcohol: the former Yugoslavian republics, Somalia, and the Middle East. The findings were compared with one million peers in the native Swedish population.

RESULTS: Compared to native Swedes, hospital admissions due to alcohol related disorders were less common in young refugees, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.65 and 95% confidence interval (CI) between 0.56 and 0.77. These risks were particularly lower among young female refugees. However, there were some differences across the refugee population. For example, the risks were higher in unaccompanied (male) refugees than accompanied ones (HR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.00-2.19), also when adjusted for age, domicile and income. While the risks were lower in young refugees from Former Yugoslavia and the Middle East relative to native Swedes, independent of their length of residence in Sweden, refugees from Somalia who had lived in Sweden for more than ten years showed increased risks (HR = 2.54, 95% CI = 1.71-3.76), after adjustments of age and domicile. These risks decreased considerably when income was adjusted for.

CONCLUSION: Young refugees have lower risks of alcohol disorders compared with native Swedes. The risks were higher in unaccompanied young (male) refugees compared to the accompanied ones. Moreover, Somalian refugees who had lived in Sweden for more than ten years seems to be particularly vulnerable to alcohol related disorders.

Keywords
Alcohol related disorders, Culture, Hospital care, Migration, Young adult refugees
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-2805 (URN)10.1186/s12889-017-4645-5 (DOI)28789620 (PubMedID)
Funder
NordForskForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2019-05-08 Created: 2019-05-08 Last updated: 2019-05-08Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7989-6748

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