rkh.sePublications from Swedish Red Cross University
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Intensive Care Unit Nurses' Conflict of Conscience: Walking the Razor's Edge
School of Nursing & Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
School of Nursing & Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
School of Nursing & Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Health Sciences Phenomenology Association, Ministry of Health and Medical Education, Tehran, Iran.
Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences. Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3589-318X
2022 (English)In: Nursing and Health Sciences, ISSN 1441-0745, E-ISSN 1442-2018, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 265-273Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The study aimed to explore the conditions that accompany conflict of conscience experienced by nurses in intensive care units. A qualitative approach guided the study, which was undertaken between April 2020 and April 2021. A total of 15 registered nurses working in intensive care units were recruited through purposive sampling. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted. The data were analyzed using a qualitative content analysis. The analysis revealed two themes: "conflict of conscience in relation to the structure" and "Conflict of conscience based on context." Conflict of conscience in relation to the structure consisted of two categories: conflict of interest and conflict of conscience and law. Conflict of conscience based on context consisted of two categories: care dilemmas and arbitrary behaviors with end-stage patients. A variety of factors were accompanied by a conflict of conscience for nurses in intensive care units. Given that conflict of conscience has negative consequences on the health and quality of nursing care, health care managers need to tailor strategies to reduce the negative consequences considering the findings of the study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022. Vol. 24, no 1, p. 265-273
Keywords [en]
Conflict of Conscience, Ethics, Intensive Care Unit (ICU), Nurse, Qualitative Study
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-4199DOI: 10.1111/nhs.12921PubMedID: 35061324OAI: oai:DiVA.org:rkh-4199DiVA, id: diva2:1631552
Available from: 2022-01-24 Created: 2022-01-24 Last updated: 2022-04-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Authority records

Mazaheri, Monir

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Mazaheri, Monir
By organisation
Department of Health Sciences
In the same journal
Nursing and Health Sciences
Nursing

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 146 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf