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Salivary surrogates of plasma nitrite and catecholamines during a 21-week training season in swimmers
Federal University of Uberlandia, Uberlandia, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
ederal University of Uberlandia, Uberlandia, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
ederal University of Uberlandia, Uberlandia, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
ederal University of Uberlandia, Uberlandia, Minas Gerais, Brazil.
2013 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 21, no 8, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The collection of samples of saliva is noninvasive and straightforward, which turns saliva into an ideal fluid for monitoring the adaptive response to training. Here, we investigated the response of the salivary proteins alpha-amylase (sAA), chromogranin A (sCgA), and the concentration of total protein (sTP) as well as salivary nitrite (sNO2) in relation to plasma catecholamines and plasma nitrite (pNO2), respectively. The variation in these markers was compared to the intensity and load of training during a 21-week training season in 12 elite swimmers. Overall, the salivary proteins tracked the concentration of plasma adrenaline and were inversely correlated with the training outcomes. No correlations were observed between sNO2 and pNO2. However, sNO2 correlated positively with the intensity and load of training. We argue that the decrease in sympathetic activity is responsible for the decrease in the concentration of proteins throughout the training season. Furthermore, the increase in nitrite is likely to reflect changes in hemodynamics and regulation of vascular tone. The association of the salivary markers with the training outcomes underlines their potential as noninvasive markers of training status in professional athletes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 21, no 8, article id 5
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Health Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-2794DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0064043PubMedID: 23700456OAI: oai:DiVA.org:rkh-2794DiVA, id: diva2:1303185
Available from: 2019-04-09 Created: 2019-04-09 Last updated: 2019-04-10Bibliographically approved

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Díaz, Miguel

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