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Dealing with troubled conscience in care of older people with dementia
The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. (Hälsa i globala transitioner (HIGT))ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3589-318X
Umeå University.
Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College / Umeå University.
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, ISSN 1609-4069, E-ISSN 1609-4069, Vol. 19, p. 40-41Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A feature of healthcare system, particularly in the care of older people, is its cultural diversity in terms of having considerable numbers of both caregivers and care recipients with an immigrant background. Considering the influence of culture in ethical decision-making processes, the idea of conscience, and the adverse effects of a troubled conscience, it is important to study these issues in culturally diverse populations. There are no published studies regarding troubled conscience among immigrant populations that include enrolled nurses. The aim of the study was to illuminate the meanings of troubled conscience and how to deal with it among enrolled nurses with Iranian backgrounds working in Swedish residential care settings. The study conducted with a phenomenological hermeneutical design. Ten nurses were interviewed. Analysis included noting a naive understanding of text as a whole followed by a structural analysis. Five subthemes and two themes were identified. The meanings of having a troubled conscience include not being a good person, being an uncaring person, not acting according to one’s values, and living in a state of unease. Dealing with a troubled conscience involves trying to compensate for the harm one has caused and trying to prevent similar situations in the future. The nurses understood themselves as caring people and not only caregivers. They knew that they should hear their conscience and respond to it by trying to be a caring person and acting according to their values.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2020. Vol. 19, p. 40-41
Keywords [en]
conscience, ethics, nurse, immigrant, culture, older people care, nursing home
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-3080OAI: oai:DiVA.org:rkh-3080DiVA, id: diva2:1371725
Conference
25th Qualitative Health Research Conference, Vancouver, BC, Canada, October 25- 29, 2019
Available from: 2019-11-20 Created: 2019-11-20 Last updated: 2020-04-16Bibliographically approved

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Mazaheri, Monir

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  • Other locale
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