Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Low blood pressure and risk of dementia in the Kungsholmen project: a 6-year follow-up study
Show others and affiliations
2003 (English)In: Archives of Neurology, ISSN 0003-9942, E-ISSN 1538-3687, Vol. 60, no 2, 223-228 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Previous studies have reported a higher prevalence of dementia in persons with low blood pressure.

Objective: To examine whether low blood pressure is prospectively associated with the occurrence of Alzheimer disease and dementia in elderly people.

Subjects and Methods: A community-based, dementia-free cohort (n = 1270) aged 75 to 101 years was longitudinally examined twice within 6 years to detect incident dementia using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Revised Third Edition criteria. Cox proportional hazards models were used to analyze blood pressure in association with dementia after adjustment for several potential confounders.

Results: During the 6-year period, 339 subjects were diagnosed with dementia, including 256 persons with Alzheimer disease. Subjects with very high systolic pressure (>180 vs 141-180 mm Hg) had an adjusted relative risk of 1.5 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-2.3; P =.07) for Alzheimer disease, and 1.6 (95% CI, 1.1-2.2) for dementia. Low systolic pressure (</=140 mm Hg) was not related to incident dementia. In contrast, high diastolic pressure (>90 mm Hg) was not associated with dementia incidence, whereas extremely low diastolic pressure (</=65 vs 66-90 mm Hg) produced an adjusted relative risk of 1.7 (95% CI, 1.1-2.4) for Alzheimer disease and 1.5 (95% CI, 1.0-2.1; P =.03) for dementia. The latter association was pronounced particularly in persons who used antihypertensive drugs.

Conclusions: Both low diastolic and high systolic pressure are associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer disease and dementia in this elderly population. The atherosclerotic process may explain the observed associations. In addition, low diastolic pressure may increase dementia risk by affecting cerebral perfusion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Medical Association , 2003. Vol. 60, no 2, 223-228 p.
Keyword [en]
alzheimer disease, dementia
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-575PubMedID: 12580707OAI: oai:DiVA.org:rkh-575DiVA: diva2:609331
Available from: 2013-03-05 Created: 2013-03-05 Last updated: 2016-04-19Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

PubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
von Strauss, Eva
In the same journal
Archives of Neurology
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 74 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf