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Deposition of cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1), and horse allergen over time in public environments--a model of dispersion
Department of Environmental Health, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2504-343X
Department of Environmental Health, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm.
Department of Environmental Health, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm.
Department of Environmental Health, Stockholm County Council, Stockholm.
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1998 (English)In: Allergy. European Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, ISSN 0105-4538, E-ISSN 1398-9995, Vol. 53, no 10, 957-961 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The occurrence and accumulation over time in public environments of cat, dog, and horse allergens was evaluated.

METHODS: Concentrations of animal danders were analyzed by ELISA and countercurrent immunoelectrophoresis (CCIE).

RESULTS: Among factory-new mattresses, 15/17 contained detectable levels of cat and/or dog allergen, whereas no horse allergen was found although six of the mattresses were stuffed with horsehair. Dust from 15 used mattresses contained significantly higher concentrations of Fe1 d 1 and Can f 1 than the factory-new ones (P < 0.001). Allergen concentrations and titers correlated to the period of time that the mattresses had been tried by customers; rs = 0.52-0.77, P = 0.04-0.001 (cat), rs = 0.38-0.48, P = 0.15-0.08 (dog), and rs = 0.64-0.74, P = 0.008-0.003 (horse). The increase over time occurred rapidly in highly frequented stores and after 3 weeks reached concentrations that have been found in homes where furred pets had formerly been kept or even the lower allergen scale of homes where pets were currently kept.

CONCLUSIONS: The dispersion of allergens from furred animals to pet-free public places is likely to occur by deposition from people who have been in direct or indirect contact with pets, and high levels of such allergens seem to accumulate in a short period of time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 1998. Vol. 53, no 10, 957-961 p.
Keyword [en]
allergen, deposition, environment, pets
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-606DOI: 10.1111/j.1398-9995.1998.tb03796.xPubMedID: 9821475OAI: oai:DiVA.org:rkh-606DiVA: diva2:610475
Available from: 2013-03-11 Created: 2013-03-11 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Egmar, Ann-Charlotte

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