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Cat and dog allergen in mattresses and textile covered floors of homes which do or do not have pets, either in the past or currently
Department of Environmental Health, Stockholm County Council, St Goran's Children's Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2504-343X
Department of Environmental Health, Stockholm County Council, St Goran's Children's Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
Department of Environmental Health, Stockholm County Council, St Goran's Children's Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
Department of Environmental Health, Stockholm County Council, St Goran's Children's Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.
1998 (English)In: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, ISSN 0905-6157, E-ISSN 1399-3038, Vol. 9, no 1, 31-35 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to measure the levels of cat and dog allergen in homes of families that had either never kept pets or kept or had kept cats or dogs. From a small residential area outside Stockholm consisting of 250 houses with similar exteriors 70 homes were included. Dust samples were collected from mattresses and textile-covered floors. The levels of cat and dog allergen were analysed by ELISA. Fel d1 was found in mattress dust in all 70 homes, median 0.5 micrograms/g [0.24-8.89 micrograms/g (quartiles)] and textile-covered floors 0.7 micrograms/g (0.20-2.52 micrograms/g). Can f1, was found in 98% of the collected samples, mattress dust 1.89 micrograms/g (0.70-9.20 micrograms/g) and textile-covered floor dust 2.5 micrograms/g (1.04-2.72 micrograms/g). There was a positive correlation (p < 0.001) between allergen levels in dust from mattresses and textile-covered floors for both Fel d1 (r = 0.68) and Can f1 (r = 0.78). The highest levels of cat and dog allergen were found in homes with furred pets (p < 0.001). A significant (p < 0.001) difference was seen in the levels of Fel d1 and Can f1 between the homes of former pet-owners and homes without pets. In summary; cat and dog allergens are present in homes regardless of whether such animals live in the house or not. Mattresses seem to be an underestimated reservoir for pet allergens even in homes without pets. It is important to note that the homes of former pet owners have much lower levels of allergen than current pet owners.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 1998. Vol. 9, no 1, 31-35 p.
Keyword [en]
allergen, pets, environment, residents
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-605DOI: 10.1111/j.1399-3038.1998.tb00297.xPubMedID: 9560840OAI: oai:DiVA.org:rkh-605DiVA: diva2:610535
Available from: 2013-03-12 Created: 2013-03-11 Last updated: 2014-10-21Bibliographically approved

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