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Trajectories of anxiety among women with breast cancer: A proxy for adjustment from acute to transitional survivorship.
The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Public Health and Medicine. Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5376-5048
Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet.
Sophiahemmet University College.
Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet.
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2015 (English)In: Journal of psychosocial oncology, ISSN 0734-7332, E-ISSN 1540-7586, Vol. 33, no 6, 603-619 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Anxiety is one of the main components of distress among women with breast cancer (BC), particularly in the early stages of the disease. Changes in anxiety over time may reflect the process of adjustment or lack thereof. The process of adjustment in the traverse of acute to transitional stages of survivorship warrants further examination.

AIM: To examine the trajectory of anxiety and the specific patterns that may indicate a lack of adjustment within two years following BC surgery.

METHODS: Survey data from a two-year prospective cohort study of 725 women with BC were analyzed by Mixture Growth Modelling and logistic regression and analysis of variance.

RESULTS: A piece wise growth curve displayed the best fit to the data, indicating a significant decrease in anxiety in the first year, followed by a slower rate of change during the second year. Four classes of trajectories were identified of which a High Stable anxiety class showed the most substantive indications of lack of adjustment. This subgroup was predominantly characterized by sociodemographic variables such as financial difficulties.

CONCLUSION: Our results support an emphasize on the transitional nature of the stage that follows the end of primary active treatment, and imply a need for supportive follow up care for those who display lack of adjustment at this stage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 33, no 6, 603-619 p.
Keyword [en]
breast cancer, anxiety, adjustment transitional survivorship
National Category
Cancer and Oncology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-1901DOI: 10.1080/07347332.2015.1082165PubMedID: 26315500OAI: oai:DiVA.org:rkh-1901DiVA: diva2:851418
Available from: 2015-09-04 Created: 2015-09-04 Last updated: 2015-12-18Bibliographically approved

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