Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Age and gender effect on the use of herbal medicine products and food supplements among the elderly
Blekinge Institute for Research and Development and School of Health Science, Blekinge Institute of Technology.
Blekinge Institute for Research and Development and School of Health Science, Blekinge Institute of Technology.
School of Health Science, Blekinge Institute of Technology.
2006 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care, ISSN 0281-3432, E-ISSN 1502-7724, Vol. 24, no 1, 50-55 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To describe the users of herbal medicine products and food supplements with regard to age and gender specifically among persons aged > or = 60 years.

DESIGN: A descriptive study with baseline data from a longitudinal study of the elderly, stratified into different age cohorts (60-69, 70-79, 80-89, and > or = 90 years).

SETTING: Blekinge county, situated in south-eastern Sweden.

SUBJECTS: In total 1380 persons aged 60-96 years (median age 78 years).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Current use of herbal medicine products and the use of food supplements.

RESULTS: Of the participants, 264/1380 (19.1%) used at least one herbal medicine product, 184/1380 (13.3%) used at least one food supplement and 382/1380 (27.7%) used herbal medicine products and/or food supplements. In all regression models, women had a higher probability of using herbal medicine and/or food supplements in comparison with men. Focusing on the use of herbal medicine products alone and the combination of using herbal medicine and/or food supplements, decreased use was seen with increasing age. However, 27.9% were still users of herbal medicine products and/or food supplements in the age group 80-89 years. In comparison, 14% were users in the age group > or = 90 years. Age did not have an impact on the probability of taking food supplements.

CONCLUSION: General practitioners need to consider the high use of herbal medicine products and food supplements among the elderly when making decisions on treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2006. Vol. 24, no 1, 50-55 p.
Keyword [en]
Age, food supplements, gender, herbal medicine
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:rkh:diva-1955DOI: 10.1080/02813130500475522PubMedID: 16464815OAI: oai:DiVA.org:rkh-1955DiVA: diva2:862622
Available from: 2015-10-23 Created: 2015-10-23 Last updated: 2015-11-03Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Stjernberg, Louise
In the same journal
Scandinavian Journal of Primary Health Care
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 17 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf