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  • 1. Cesta, Amedeo
    et al.
    Cortellessa, Gabriella
    Fracasso, Francessca
    Orlandini, Andrea
    Fredriksson, Carin
    Lidskog, Marie
    Pettersson, Ingvor
    Engfeldt, Peter
    Forsberg, Annette
    Östlund, Britt
    Lund University.
    Turno, Marcello
    Gutierrez, Carlos
    GiraffPlus: D1.1 User Requirements and Design Principles Report2012Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This document reports on the work performed in Task 1.1 User requirements analysis and Task 1.2 GiraffPlus Environment Design Principles. Specifically, it describes the results of a deep involvement of users, both primary (elderly living in their apartment), and secondary (health care professional or family members and friends) recruited in our studies. The report details the qualitative and quantitative research carried out in the three countries of Sweden, Spain and Italy, to elicit user requirements and expectations in terms of type of services as well as system design and appearance. Some qualitative cross-cultural analysis has also been performed in order to highlight differences emerged during the studies in the three countries. Result of this effort is list of user requirements and a set of preferences on different mockups of a component of the system that can be both used to influence the future architecture definition and functional specification of the GiraffPlus system. The work described in this deliverable constitutes the starting point of T1.3 Technological Component Assessment and Selection and overall provides useful hints to the whole system development.

  • 2.
    Coradeschi, Silvia
    et al.
    Örebro University, AASS.
    Cesta, Amadeo
    CNR-ISTC, Rome.
    Cortellessa, Gabriella
    CNR-ISTC, Rome.
    Coraci, Luca
    CNR-ISTC, Rome.
    Galindo, C
    Malaga University.
    Gonzalez, Javier
    Malaga University.
    Karlsson, Lars
    Örebro University, AASS.
    Forsberg, Anette
    Örebro Landstinget.
    Frennert, Susanne
    Lund University.
    Furfari, Francesco
    CNR-ISTI, Pisa.
    Loutfi, Amy
    Örebro University, AASS.
    Orlandini, Andrea
    CNR-ISTC, Rome.
    Palumbo, Filippo
    CNR-ISTI, Pisa.
    Pecora, Federico
    Örebro University, AASS.
    von Rump, Stephan
    Giraff AB, Västerås.
    Štimec, Ales
    XRPOISD, Ljubljana.
    Ullberg, Jonas
    Örebro University, AASS.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lund University.
    GiraffPlus: A System for Monitoring Activities and Physiological Parameters and Promoting Social Interaction for Elderly2014In: Human-Computer Systems Interaction: Backgrounds and Applications 3 / [ed] Hippe, Zdzisław S.; Kulikowski, Juliusz L.; Mroczek, Teresa; Wtorek, Jerzy, Springer, 2014, p. 261-271Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents a telehealth system called GiraffPlus supporting independent living of elderly in their own home. GiraffPlus system is a complex system which monitors activities and physiological parameters in the home using a network of sensors. The elaborated information is presented to the primary user, the elderly, and to secondary users like health care and home care providers and possibly to family members as a help to assess possible health and wellbeing deterioration, provide acute alarms, and support health procedure. The secondary users can also visit the elderly via the Giraff, a teleoperated robot that can communicate and move in the home under the control of the secondary user. The chapter focusses in particular on the deployment of the system in six real homes in Sweden, Italy and Spain. The chapter outlines the technological various components used, the expectations of the users and the evaluation method.

  • 3.
    Essen, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lund University.
    Laggards as Innovators?: Old Users as Designers of New Services & Service Systems2011In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 89-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Involving users in the design process is increasingly discussed as the quickest and most reliable way to capture the needs of users and consumers. In parallel, the fastest growing population segment in Asia and the West is older people. This article asks whether their involvement in the design process could accelerate a growing service market and if so, how? It addresses a knowledge gap that constrains service provision for a growing market of older people and which underestimates older people's potential contribution in the early phases of the development of new services. The current role of older users is limited to that of test persons later in the design process or as objects of randomized samples that explore consumers' reactions to existing products. The present case study provides an empirical example of how old users can be involved in the early stages of service design. In doing this, the article questions the concept of old users as laggards. It suggests great potential to include such users - been arounds - as sources of innovation in the earlier phases of the design process if they have the right tools and opportunities to act. In identifying unsatisfied needs and potential market solutions, the inclusion of old users in user-driven projects can contribute to the generation of business ideas.

  • 4.
    Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University.
    Eftring, Håkan
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University.
    Östlund, Britt
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University.
    Older people's involvement in the development of a social assistive robot2013In: Social Robotics: 5th International Conference, ICSR 2013, Bristol, UK, October 27-29, 2013, Proceedings / [ed] G. Herrmann et al., 2013, p. 8-18Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of social assistive robots is a promising approach to enable a growing number of elderly people to continue to live in their own homes as long as possible. Older people are often an excluded group in product development; however this age group is the fastest growing segment in most developed societies. We present a participatory design approach as a methodology to create a dialogue with older people in order to understand the values embodied in robots. We present the results of designing and deploying three participatory workshops and implementing a subsequent robot mock-up study. The results indicate that robot mock-ups can be used as a tool to broaden the knowledge-base of the users' personal goals and device needs in a variety of ways, including supporting age-related changes, supporting social interaction and regarding robot aesthetic. Concerns that robots may foster inactivity and laziness as well as loss of human contact were repeatedly raised and must be addressed in the development of assistive domestic robots.

  • 5.
    Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University.
    Eftring, Håkan
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University.
    Östlund, Britt
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University.
    What older people expect of robots: A mixed methods approach2013In: Social Robotics: 5th International Conference, ICSR 2013, Bristol, UK, October 27-29, 2013, Proceedings / [ed] Herrmann et al., 2013, p. 19-29Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on how older people in Sweden imagine the potential role of robots in their lives. The data collection involved mixed methods, including focus groups, a workshop, a questionnaire and interviews. The findings obtained and lessons learnt from one method fed into another. In total, 88 older people were involved. The results indicate that the expectations and preconceptions about robots are multi-dimensional and ambivalent. Ambivalence can been seen in the tension between the benefits of having a robot looking after the older people, helping with or carrying out tasks they no longer are able to do, and the parallel attitudes, resilience and relational inequalities that accompany these benefits. The participants perceived that having a robot might be "good for others but not themselves", "good as a machine not a friend" while their relatives and informal caregivers perceived a robot as "not for my relative but for other older people". 

  • 6.
    Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Department of Design Sciences , Certec, Lund University .
    Forsberg, Anette
    School of Health and Medical Sciences , Örebro University.
    Östlund, Britt
    Department of Design Sciences , Lund University.
    Elderly People's Perceptions of a Telehealthcare System: Relative Advantage, Compatibility, Complexity and Observability2013In: Journal of technology in human services, ISSN 1522-8835, E-ISSN 1522-8991, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 218-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of telehealthcare systems to promote independent living for elderly people is growing. The results presented in this article, derived from an initial user lab test of a telecare system-GiraffPlus-indicate that the crucial factor for adoption of telehealthcare systems is not usability but the system's ability to support autonomy in everyday life. Eleven users tested the usability and reported what they perceived as possible benefits of having such a system at home. To support autonomy, customization is crucial for the system to be perceived as meaningful for the individual. Our analysis confirms previous research

  • 7.
    Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lund University.
    Eftring, Håkan
    Lund University.
    Capturing seniors' requirements for assistive robots by the use of attention cards2012In: NordiCHI '12 Proceedings of the 7th Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Making Sense Through Design, New York: ACM Press, 2012, p. 783-784Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes and reflects upon a senior-oriented participatory design methodology that facilitates communication, attention and creativity. Previous research indicates that seniors tend to lose focus and start cross talking during workshops, which results in broad and superficial findings. However, our workshop methodology indicates that the use of attention cards helps the seniors to stay focused by visualizing concrete first person narrative scenarios. This paper does not describe the findings of the workshop. Instead, we use our experience to propose ways in which the process of eliciting user requirements for novel technologies from old users with no prior experience of the technology in question can be made.

  • 8.
    Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lund University.
    Eftring, Håkan
    Lund University.
    Would granny let an assistive robot into her home?2012In: Social Robotics: 4th International Conference, ICSR 2012, Chengdu, China, October 29-31, 2012. Proceedings, 2012, p. 128-137Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assistive robots have received considerable research attention due to the increase of the senior population around the world and the shortage of caregivers. However, limited attention has been paid to involving seniors in the design process in order to elicit their attitudes and perception of having their own robot. This study addresses this issue. We conducted a workshop with 14 Swedish seniors age 65 to 86. The findings indicate that: (1) the functionality of the robot is far more important than the appearance; (2) the usefulness will determine the acceptance of a robot; (3) seniors feel it is important to keep up to date with new technological developments; (4) assistive robots were not perceived as intrusive and having a robotic presence in the seniors' bathrooms and bedrooms was considered acceptable. These findings suggest that seniors are prepared to give assistive robots a try if the robot is perceived as useful. 

  • 9.
    Hallberg, David
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    A way forward: language policies in enhancing bi-regional cooperation in science and technology2010In: The CAAST-Net Bulletin, Vol. December, p. 8-9Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article illustrates potential ways to take account of the use of languages in international conferences and in transnational cooperation, and may be fruitful for readers delving into efforts to promote global cooperation. It communicates research notes and documents from CAAST-Net’s stakeholders’ conference, entitled “Africa-Europe Cooperation in Science and Technology: Status and Way Forward”, on the 10th to 11th November 2009. The conference was held in Mombasa, Kenya.

  • 10.
    Hallberg, David
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Recognising Local Experiences for the Success of Vision 2030 in Kenya: Using Pen-Pals in Education as a Case2011In: Journal of Education and Vocational Research, ISSN 2221-2590, E-ISSN 2221-2590, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 99-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study takes account of the everyday-life experience of a group of women in a resource-poor environment in Kenya. They are part of a group that the Kenyan Government wants to include in their investments in order to enhance social and economic equality. The overall purpose of the study is to learn about the potential impact of such investments on women in resource-poor environments in Kenya. In fulfilling its purpose the study takes into consideration (1) experiences of everyday-life among women in Lunga-Lunga and (2) maps strategies to recognise these experiences. The results of the study are expected to be fruitful as regards planning strategies that are of use for Vision 2030 and the development of Kenyan society. The study was carried out in two steps: the first consisted in participatory action research and the second was a follow-up study. To guide the study the notion of ‘experience’ is critical. During sessions and in letters to their pen-pals, the women express feelings regarding cultural, family, and health issues. For instance, some of the feelings experienced have arisen because the women are isolated from the larger world outside their own immediate environment and lack literacy skills. The study will be useful in planning governmental actions that strive to better recognise and educate citizens–especially women–in resource-poor environments.

  • 11.
    Hallberg, David
    KTH, Data- och systemvetenskap, DSV.
    Socioculture and cognitivist perspectives on language and communication barriers in learning2009In: Proceedings of World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology, ISSN 2010-376X, E-ISSN 2070-3740, Vol. 36, no 3(12), p. 172-181Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is believed that major account on language diversity must be taken in learning, and especially in learning using ICT. This paper's objective is to exhibit language and communication barriers in learning, to approach the topic from socioculture and cognitivist perspectives, and to give exploratory solutions of handling such barriers. The review is mainly conducted by approaching the journal Computers & Education, but also an initially broad search was conducted. The results show that not much attention is paid on language and communication barriers in an immediate relation to learning using ICT. The results shows, inter alia, that language and communication barriers are caused because of not enough account is taken on both the individual's background and the technology.

  • 12.
    Hallberg, David
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    The Kenyan 'Digital Villages Project' from a behavioural perspective2011In: 2011 International Conference on Advances in ICT for Emerging Regions (ICTer), IEEE Computer Society Digital Library , 2011, p. 71-76Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This reflective paper sheds light on the Kenyan Government’s Digital Villages Project. The project strives to decrease the disparities between urban and rural environments across the country using information and communications technologies. The structure of the project is inspired by the Capability Maturity Model. This paper proposes the use of behavioural archaeology instead. The use of behavioural archaeology enables important aspects and results of the project to be illuminated and captured. In addition a specific focus is placed upon the political implications of the project and their effect on rural Kenya.

  • 13.
    Hallberg, David
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Godem, Carole
    AIESEC, Douala, Cameroon.
    Dzimey, Walter
    National Health Insurance Authority, Kuntenase, Ashanti, Ghana.
    Telecentre approaches in Cameroon and Kenya illuminated using behavioural archaeology2012In: The African journal of information and communication, ISSN 2077-7205, E-ISSN 2077-7213, no 12, p. 48-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout the last decade, telecentres have provided access to electronic communications as supporting information and communications technology infrastructure for community, economic, educational and social development. While the origins of telecentres can be traced to Europe's tele-cottage and Community Technology Centers in the United States in the 1980s, telecentres have taken on a number of varying forms and approaches. This article illuminates approaches used by telecentre projects in Kenya and Cameroon using behavioural archaeology. Literature stresses that behavioural archaeology refers to understanding the artefact as a tool in human activity and technology as the embodiment of human activity in the artefact. Application of the concept to understanding telecentres sheds light on the nature of the use of technology that leads to the existence of particular results or societal outcomes. Using a qualitative methodology, managers, local contractors, and technicians at local telecentres were interviewed. The results show differing approaches to telecentres purpose and design. In Kenya, the focus is on e-government services, whilst in Cameroon it is on conflict solving among different tribes. In its use of behavioural archaeology, this article adds a new perspective to the challenges of making information and communications technology and electronic media available in resource-poor environments.

  • 14.
    Hallberg, David
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Hansson, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Nilsson, Anders G.
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för data- och systemvetenskap.
    Constrains of ICT in Lifelong Learning on Disadvantaged Women2014In: Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing Countries, ISSN 1681-4835, E-ISSN 1681-4835, Vol. 61, no 8, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws attention to the urgency of taking into consideration women’s gender-specific needs and interests in the implementation of community-based ICT projects in lifelong learning. We set out this research to understand the constraints of information and communications technology (ICT) in lifelong learning on disadvantaged women. National statistics and data from field studies were used. The constraints and their consequences at national level are often a result of national policies and regulations – or lack thereof – while the constraints and their consequences at local/regional level involve everyday-life occurrences that are present in women's immediate surroundings. Hence, an understanding of both levels is critical. This research is valuable for stakeholders delving into issues of development intervention using ICTs, not only in Kenya but in a broader, global perspective.

  • 15.
    Jonsson, Oskar
    et al.
    Department of Design Sciences, Industrial design, Lund University.
    Sperling, Lena
    Department of Design Sciences, Industrial design, Lund University.
    Östlund, Britt
    Department of Design Sciences, Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology (EAT), Lund University.
    Dalholm Hornyánszky, Elisabeth
    Department of Design Sciences, Ergonomics and Aerosol Technology (EAT), Lund University.
    User Requirements of Furniture Influenced by a Move to a Senior Housing: Focus Group Interviews on Changes forPeople in the Third Age2012In: FORMakademisk, ISSN 1890-9515, E-ISSN 1890-9515, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 49-67Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16. Karlsson, MariAnne
    et al.
    Östlund, Britt
    Users in action: stories of users and telematics in everyday life1999Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Magnusson, Charlotte
    et al.
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University.
    Östlund, Britt
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University.
    Rassmus-Gröhn, Kirsten
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University.
    Hedlund, Allan
    Swedish Stroke Association.
    Making navigation simple?: Initial user studies within the NavMem project2014In: Universal Design 2014: Three Days of Creativity and Diversity / [ed] Héctor Caltenco, Per-Olof Hedvall, Andreas Larsson, Kirsten Rassmus-Gröhn, Bitte Rydeman, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2014, Vol. 35, p. 214-223Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the NavMem project is to develop a mobile navigation companion for elderly persons with memory decline (MCI). The project is intended for a wide range of target users-e.g. persons with memory problems due to early dementia, stroke but also elderly persons in general. In the following we report results from studies made together with the Swedish Stroke Association. We describe the early stages of the user centered design process and provide a list of requirements. We also provide initial designs and early prototypes and report preliminary results from recent user tests.

  • 18.
    Subasi, Özge
    et al.
    HCI-Group, Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Fitzpatrick, Geraldine
    HCI-Group, Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Malmborg, Lone
    IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Östlund, Britt
    Rehabilitation Engineering, Design Sciences, Lund University.
    Design culture for ageing well: Designing for 'situated elderliness'2013In: Human Factors in Computing and Informatics: First International Conference, SouthCHI 2013, Maribor, Slovenia, July 1-3, 2013. Proceedings / [ed] Holzinger, Ziefle, Hitz & Debevc, Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2013, p. 581-584Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The "Design Culture for Ageing Well: Designing for 'Situated Elderliness' " special track focuses on everyday practices and notions of ageing that can be relevant to Human Computer Interaction (HCI). In collaboration with senior associations, designers and theoreticians we elaborate on how newer notions of ageing might inform HCI design. With this track, we concentrate on bottom-up practices of ageing in everyday life, such as used language (visual and verbal) and diverse practices of senior communities (e.g: in different cultures). Our ambition is to go beyond framing support for ageing through a disability-support assistive lens and explore new approaches to designing through ageing well and life experiences as sources for innovations.

  • 19.
    Subasi, Özge
    et al.
    Department Of Design And Assessment Of Technology, Vienna University Of Technology.
    Malmborg, Lone
    Department Of Design Research Group, IT University of Copenhagen.
    Fitzpatrick, Geraldine
    Department Of Design And Assessment Of Technology, Vienna University Of Technology.
    Östlund, Britt
    Department of Design Sciences at Lund University.
    Reframing design culture and aging2014In: interactions, ISSN 1072-5520, E-ISSN 1558-3449, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 70-73Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Design professionals with a commitment to participatory design all want to engage with real people. A focus of discussion at the workshop was the nature of this engagement and how to rethink the dynamic relationship between older people and the designers in the design process. Working directly within the everyday practices of a group with similar interests independent of their age, physical abilities, or professional practices can help researchers co-create concepts in everyday contexts. In practice there are various ways that designers can be more reflective about their own conceptualizations of aging. At a very simple level, designers can reflect on and integrate an enriched understanding of aging as a positive adaptive process into the design visuals and design languages they create, namely the pictures and slogans they use, the logos they design, and the forms of communications and prototypes they build.

  • 20. Topo, Päivi
    et al.
    Östlund, Britt
    Dementia, design and technology: time to get involved2009Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Waller, Peter Abdelmassih
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lund University.
    Jönsson, Bodil
    Lund University.
    The Extended Television: Using tangible computing to meet the needs of older persons at a nursing home2008In: Gerontechnology, ISSN 1569-1101, E-ISSN 1569-111X, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 36-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a person-centred model and a tangible computing approach to better adapt television media to meet two important needs of older people: social inclusion in their immediate surroundings and better support for one's own reflections. Method The research project was carried out as a part of the construction, planning and implementation of a new nursing home. The implemented infrastructure enabled television watching at three levels: the regular (broadcast programmes), the internal and the personal. The internal level consisted of an in-house broadcast television channel and two media centres placed in common areas. The personal level had individualised functions. The entire concept is referred to as 'extended television'. This paper describes the early implementation phase of the internal television channel and the personal television photo album. It also examines the consequences of a person-centred model and a tangible computing approach. Participation in the use of the 'ex-tended television' together with older people, relatives and care workers, semi-structured dialogues with these people, and observations of the television usage were conducted. Furthermore, the care workers were invited to comment on the prototypes very early in the process. Results Both the internal channel and the personal television photo album were used by older residents and iteratively adapted. However, too many factors and routines varied to get statistically sound results. On the other hand, the research shows that the person-centred study design utilised provided positive results in a setting with constantly changing conditions. Discussion This design encourages further investigations regarding how new conceptual television design can enrich the everyday lives of older people. The results also indicate the plausibility of television photo albums providing new opportunities for reminiscence compared to traditional ones, and that the internal channel resulted in possibilities for social inclusion in the nursing home examined.

  • 22.
    Östlund, Britt
    Swedish Research Council.
    Design Paradigms and Misunderstood Technology: The Case of Older Users2005In: Young technologies in old hands: an international view on senior citizen's utilization of ICT / [ed] Birgit Jæger, Copenhagen: DJØF Forlag, 2005, p. 25-39Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 23. Östlund, Britt
    Do Computers have a future within the care of elderly people?1993In: Perceived needs of the elderly about mobility / [ed] W.P.J.M. van den Oever, J.A.M. Graafmans, Knegsel: Akontes , 1993Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary of remarks with reference to a Swedish study about new technology in elderly people´s housing.

  • 24. Östlund, Britt
    Hur kan teknik skapa möjligheter för äldre människor?2012In: E-hälsa: innovationer, metoder, interventioner och perspektiv. / [ed] Gunvor Gard, Anita Melander Wikman, Studentlitteratur AB, 2012, p. 209-221Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25. Östlund, Britt
    Images, users, practices: senior citizens entering the IT-society1999Report (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Östlund, Britt
    Linköpings universitet.
    IT landar i vardagen1995In: Världens största maskin: människan och det globala telekommunikationssystemet / [ed] Magnus Karlsson & Lennart Sturesson, Stockholm: Carlsson Bokförlag, 1995, p. 78-90Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Östlund, Britt
    Department of Technology and Social Change, Linköping University.
    Social or technical perspectives - does it matter?1998In: Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, ISSN 0926-9630, E-ISSN 1879-8365, Vol. 48, p. 438-442Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Östlund, Britt
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University.
    Social science research on technology and the elderly – does it exist?2004In: Science Studies, ISSN 0786-3012, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 44-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the fact that old people´s technological needs have been given much attention to in the last decennium, especially old users of information- and communication technology, technology has not found its natural place in research on ageing in modern societies. This article examines to what extent social science research exist in the field of ageing and technology and where we can find the interface between technological and social science expertise. Scientific publications during the period 1983-2002 are analysed in terms of theoretical content, the role of the elderly as being regarded as objects or subjects, and if technology is called into question in any respect. Scientific well-grounded knowledge exist besides less well-substantiated assumptions regarding the effects of technology and a premature body of thoughts on the relationship between technology and the elderly.

  • 29. Östlund, Britt
    Svensk forskning om användning av informations- och kommunikationsteknik: en kunskapsöversikt2000Report (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Östlund, Britt
    Linköpings universitet.
    Tanter och teknik: om äldre människors möten med informationsteknik1996In: Från symaskin till cyborg: genus, teknik och social förändring / [ed] Elisabeth Sundin & Boel Berner, Stockholm: Nerenius & Santérus , 1996, p. 67-83Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Östlund, Britt
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University.
    Teknik, IT och åldrande: hur fungerar det för patienter, omsorgstagare och äldre medborgare?2013 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
  • 32. Östlund, Britt
    Users on the Agenda: Strategies and Theories1999In: What difference does IT make?: Eleven views on the information societ / [ed] Kajsa Ellegård & Magnus Johansson, Stockholm: Kommunikationsforskningsberedningen , 1999Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33. Östlund, Britt
    Vidgar IT gapet mellan generationer?1999In: IT i demokratins tjänst / [ed] Erik Amnå, Stockholm: Fakta info direkt , 1999, p. 157-182Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Östlund, Britt
    Linköpings universitet.
    Äldre människors förutsättningar i IT-samhället1997In: Äldrepolitik i förändring? / [ed] Kristina Jennbert & Richard Lagercrantz, Stockholm: Välfärdsprojektet, Socialdepartementet , 1997, p. 71-87Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Östlund, Britt
    et al.
    Lund University Sweden, Department of Design Sciences.
    Olander, Elin
    Lund University Sweden, Department of Design Sciences.
    Jonsson, Oskar
    Lund University Sweden, Department of Design Sciences.
    Frennert, Susanne
    Lund University Sweden, Department of Design Sciences.
    STS-inspired design to meet the challenges of modern aging. Welfare technology as a tool to promote user driven innovations or another way to keep older users hostage?2014In: Technological forecasting & social change, ISSN 0040-1625, E-ISSN 1873-5509, Vol. 93, p. 82-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older technology users and their integration into IT society have been on the research agenda since digitalization took off. Given the attempts to develop user-driven design, it is surprising that the appearance of technologies older people are provided with, or are the target group for, have not progressed. Now another political agenda, coined as "welfare technology", is being launched in Scandinavia. It is the reminiscent of previous arguments for why demographics, welfare and the need for new business arenas should be prioritized. This paper argues that STS-inspired design can contribute to a paradigm shift that breaks this trend and instead helps to develop proactive technology that meets the needs and demands of today’s senior citizens. Two cases illustrate the way the imbalance between technology and older people’s influence persists over time. Another three cases with a bearing on design sciences are singled out and discussed: the selection of older subjects; the understanding of the "social" in going from the laboratory to real-life settings; and the "making of meaning" in product development. The conclusions point to the opportunity to bridge the imbalance when introducing welfare technology by introducing STS-inspired reflections on engineering and design.

  • 36. Östlund, Britt
    et al.
    Stark, Agneta
    Hagberg, Jan-Erik
    Lorentzon, Peter
    Hedqvist, Torbjörn
    Teknik för hela livet – äldres behov, teknikers och marknaders utveckling2003In: Arbetsliv och samhälle: bilagedel B till SOU 2003:91, Stockholm: Fritzes, 2003, p. 121-171Chapter in book (Other academic)
1 - 36 of 36
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