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  • 1.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik.
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University and Skåne University Hospital, 205 06 Malmö.
    Perseius, Kent-Inge
    Research Unit, Psychiatry Division, Kalmar County Council.
    Practice-based improvement ideas in healthcare services2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. The present study will contribute to knowledge of how practitioners in a healthcare region engage in quality improvement initiatives. The focus is on individual placement needs, problems/issues and the ability to organize work on the development, implementation and institutionalization of ideas for the healthcare sector.

    Design and settings. This study is based on the Kalmar county council Improvement Program. Healthcare departments and primary healthcare centers in the county council were invited to apply for money to accomplish improvement projects. The aim is to empirically identify and present the different kinds of practice-based improvement ideas developed in healthcare services. The 202 applications received from various healthcare departments and primary healthcare centers are analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    Outcome and Results. Five types of improvement projects were identified: Organizational Process; Evidence and Quality; Competence Development; Process Technology; and Proactive Patient Work. This illustrates the range of strategies that encourage letting individual units define their own improvement needs. In addition, a common characteristic among the studied project applications is to increase patient safety, effectiveness and availability of care, and education/training. Those intentions are found in many of the applications and therefore give the impression of being most important to caregivers today.

    Conclusions. These projects point to the various problems and experiences healthcare professionals encounter in their day-to-day work. This paper provides valuable insights into the current state of improvement work in Swedish healthcare, and will serve as a foundation for further investigations in this quality program.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik.
    Elg, Mattias
    Linköpings universitet, Institutionen för ekonomisk och industriell utveckling, Kvalitetsteknik.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University and Skåne University Hospital, 205 06 Malmö.
    Perseius, Kent-Inge
    Research Unit, Psychiatry Division, Kalmar County Council.
    Who conducts quality improvement initiatives in healthcare services?: An evaluation of an improvement program in acounty council in Sweden2010Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The aim of this paper is to contribute to the knowledge of who engages in quality improvement initiatives and to describe whether staff professions or gender are relevant variables.

    Design/methodology/approach – This paper contains an evaluation of the participants in a specific defined strategic improvement initiative program in one county council in southeast Sweden. The improvement program was initiated by county council politicians to encourage improvement initiatives and to spread improvement skills and knowledge in the organization. The program is driven both “top down” (teaching/convincing line managers to demand improvements) and “bottom up” through improvement programs using methodology to help teams identify, plan and adopt improvements in their daily work. Data was collected from special applications (called Free Applications, FA) and from participants in the education program (called Improvement Program, IP), both of which include information about profession and 2 gender. A content analysis was made. After the first categorization of which types of improvement projects practitioners engage in, further analysis of staff disciplines, professions (hierarchy) and gender was done. The results were compared to the overall structure of staff presence in the county council.

    Findings – Changes in participation occurred over time. The FA (Free Applications) part (n=202) shows a higher share of leaders and managers (35%), but their participation in the IP (Improvement Program) (n=477) fluctuated (8-26%). Physicians were more represented in the FA than in the IP. The largest single group was nurses. Overall the gender perspective reflects the conditions of the county council, but in FA the representation of women was lower. Five types of improvement projects were identified: 1) Organizational process focus; 2) Evidence and quality; 3) Competence development; 4) Process Technology; and 5) Proactive patient work. Managers were most represented in the category “Organizational process”. The largest difference was seen in the category “Proactive patient work” with the highest occurrence among women (86%) and less among men (17%) and managers (21%). The patient as a contributor taking active part was not found in either the FA or the IP.

    Research limitations/implications – This study shows differences in participation between free applications and methodology-guided programs when it comes to professions and gender in the country council improvement drive. It may be useful for further research regarding how to successfully work for and implement improvements and change in healthcare environments.

    Practical implications – The study will discuss and contribute to further knowledge of whether profession, hierarchy and gender have an impact (obstructive or as an asset) in performing improvement work in healthcare settings.

    Originality/value - Not much has been written about who is accomplishing quality improvements in terms of profession and gender. This paper provides some valuable insights into the differences between staff categories (professions) and gender in the improvement work in Swedish healthcare.

  • 3.
    Backman, Sara
    et al.
    School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Fiber, and Polymer Technology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm.
    Björling, Gunilla
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Division of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Stockholm.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University College, Stockholm.
    Lysdahl, Michael
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Division of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Stockholm.
    Markström, Agneta
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Division of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Stockholm.
    Schedin, Ulla
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Sciences, Danderyd Hospital, Division of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Stockholm.
    Aune, Ragnhild E
    School of Industrial Technology and Management, Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm.
    Frostell, Claes
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Anesthesia, Surgical Services and Intensive Care, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockhol.
    Karlsson, Sigbritt
    School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Fiber, and Polymer Technology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm.
    Material wear of polymeric tracheostomy tubes: A six-month study2009In: The Laryngoscope, ISSN 0023-852X, E-ISSN 1531-4995, Vol. 119, no 4, p. 657-664Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives were to study long-term material wear of tracheostomy tubes made of silicone (Si), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and polyurethane (PU) after 3 and 6 months of clinical use.

    STUDY DESIGN: The study has a prospective and comparative design.

    METHODS: Nineteen patients with long-term tracheostomy, attending the National Respiratory Center in Sweden, were included, n = 6 with Si tubes, n = 8 with PVC tubes, and n = 5 with PU tubes. The tubes were exposed to the local environment in the trachea for 3 and 6 months and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry.

    RESULTS: All tubes revealed severe surface changes. No significant differences were established after 3 or 6 months of exposure between the various materials. The changes had progressed significantly after this period, compared to previously reported changes after 30 days of exposure. The results from all analyzing techniques correlated well.

    CONCLUSIONS: All tubes, exposed in the trachea for 3-6 months, revealed major degradation and changes in the surface of the material. Polymeric tracheostomy tubes should be changed before the end of 3 months of clinical use.

  • 4.
    Björling, Gunilla
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, National Respiratory Centre, Stockholm.
    Axelsson, Sara
    School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Fibre and Polymer Technology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm.
    Johansson, Unn-Britt
    Sophiahemmet University College, Stockholm.
    Lysdahl, Michael
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, National Respiratory Centre, Stockholm.
    Markström, Agneta
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, National Respiratory Centre, Stockholm.
    Schedin, Ulla
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd Hospital, National Respiratory Centre, Stockholm.
    Aune, Ragnhild E
    School of Industrial Technology and Management, Materials Science and Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm.
    Frostell, Claes
    Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Karlsson, Sigbritt
    School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Fibre and Polymer Technology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Stockholm.
    Clinical use and material wear of polymeric tracheostomy tubes2007In: The Laryngoscope, ISSN 0023-852X, E-ISSN 1531-4995, Vol. 117, no 9, p. 1552-1559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives were to compare the duration of use of polymeric tracheostomy tubes, i.e., silicone (Si), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and polyurethane (PU), and to determine whether surface changes in the materials could be observed after 30 days of patient use.

    METHODS: Data were collected from patient and technical records for all tracheostomized patients attending the National Respiratory Center in Sweden. In the surface study, 19 patients with long-term tracheostomy were included: six with Bivona TTS Si tubes, eight with Shiley PVC tubes, and five with Trachoe Twist PU tubes. All tubes were exposed in the trachea for 30 days before being analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). New tubes and tubes exposed in phosphate-buffered saline were used as reference. RESULTS: Si tubes are used for longer periods of time than those made of PVC (P<.0001) and PU (P=.021). In general, all polymeric tubes were used longer than the recommended 30-day period. Eighteen of the 19 tubes exposed in patients demonstrated, in one or more areas of the tube, evident surface changes. The morphologic changes identified by SEM correlate well with the results obtained by ATR-FTIR.

    CONCLUSIONS: Si tracheostomy tubes are in general used longer than those made of PVC and PU. Most of the tubes exposed in the trachea for 30 days suffered evident surface changes, with degradation of the polymeric chains as a result.

  • 5.
    Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University.
    Eftring, Håkan
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University.
    Östlund, Britt
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University.
    Using attention cards to facilitate active participation in eliciting old adults' requirements for assistive robots2013In: IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Interactive Communication: RO-MAN 2013, IEEE conference proceedings, 2013, p. 774-779Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engaging old users in the exploration of future product concepts can be challenging. It is of great value to find ways to actively involve them in the design of novel technologies intended for them, particularly when they have no prior experience of the technology in question. One obstacle in this process is that many old people do not identify themselves as being old or they think that it (the technology) would be good for others but not themselves. This paper presents a card method to overcome this obstacle. A full-day workshop with three internal focus groups was run with 14 participants. Based on our experience, we propose a way in which active participation in the process of eliciting user requirements for assistive robots from old users with no prior experience of assistive robots can be carried out.

  • 6.
    Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Department of Design Sciences , Certec, Lund University .
    Forsberg, Anette
    School of Health and Medical Sciences , Örebro University.
    Östlund, Britt
    Department of Design Sciences , Lund University.
    Elderly People's Perceptions of a Telehealthcare System: Relative Advantage, Compatibility, Complexity and Observability2013In: Journal of technology in human services, ISSN 1522-8835, E-ISSN 1522-8991, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 218-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of telehealthcare systems to promote independent living for elderly people is growing. The results presented in this article, derived from an initial user lab test of a telecare system-GiraffPlus-indicate that the crucial factor for adoption of telehealthcare systems is not usability but the system's ability to support autonomy in everyday life. Eleven users tested the usability and reported what they perceived as possible benefits of having such a system at home. To support autonomy, customization is crucial for the system to be perceived as meaningful for the individual. Our analysis confirms previous research

  • 7.
    Frennert, Susanne
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Design Sci.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lund Univ, Dept Design Sci.
    Review: Seven Matters of Concern of Social Robots and Older People2014In: International Journal of Social Robotics, ISSN 1875-4791, E-ISSN 1875-4805, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 299-310Article, review/survey (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Jönsson, Bodil
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lunds universitet.
    Vittring2007In: Tidningen äldreomsorg, ISSN 1403-7025, no 4, p. 43-45Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lunds universitet.
    Den motsägelsefulla visionen: vem avgör vilken teknik de äldre behöver?2006In: Tvärsnitt, ISSN 0348-7997, no 2, p. 32-34Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10. Östlund, Britt
    Elderly in Action in Front of the Television1998In: Methodologies for media and information technology research in everyday life / [ed] Roger Silverstone & Maren Hartmann, Falmer: University of Sussex , 1998Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 11. Östlund, Britt
    Experiences with Safety-Alarmes for the Elderly in Sweden1994In: Technology for the elderly: safety-alarm systems, technical aids and smart homes / [ed] Claudia Wild & Andrea Kirschner, Knegsel: Akontes , 1994Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lund University.
    Final Evaluation Report with included Cross Cultural Analysis Report D6.3 for the EC Project GiraffPlus. Combining social interaction and long term monitoring for promoting independent living.2015Report (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lunds universitet.
    Har aeldre mennesker brug for design?2008In: Gerontologi: aldring og aeldre - forskning og udvikling, ISSN 1604-8644, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 16-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 14.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lund University.
    Intermediate Evaulation Report D6.2 for the EC Project GiraffPlus. Combining social interaction and long term monitoring for promoting independent living.2014Report (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lunds universitet.
    Med blick för tekniken2007In: Tidningen äldreomsorg, ISSN 1403-7025, no 4, p. 29-32Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Östlund, Britt
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University.
    Silver age innovators: A new approach to old users2011In: The Silver Market Phenomen: Market and Innovation in the Aging Society / [ed] Florian Kohlbacher, Herstatt Cornelius, Berlin: Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2011, 2, p. 15-26Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    When designing innovations for the silver age, it is not sufficient to discover old people’s needs only. In addition, one also has to discover old peoples’ new roles as consumers, citizens and innovators. Since these are people who until recently have been given few opportunities to make their voices heard, there is a need for methods that identify their needs and demands. More importantly, we need to study and use methods that reveal the sources of innovations behind their expressed problems and lifelong habits as users of technology. Three attempts to identify old people’s needs and demands by involving them in the design process are presented, drawn from design projects implemented in Sweden from 2005 to 2009. One project explores how the furniture market can be opened to new segments of older consumers. Another project concerns the development of services. The third project links older people’s lifelong habit of watching TV to the development of communication via the television medium. The results were analyzed from two points of view: How do we recognise a need that can be explored in design? When discovered, how do we know that this is a worthwhile need to explore? The first attempt shows that older people can present needs as active users with expressed and specific demands; the second attempt shows that older users can have a need to support the solution to problems which are not yet expressed and activated; and the third attempt shows them as users with latent needs that originate from their lifelong experiences, and needs to keep up with daily routines. 

  • 17.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lunds universitet.
    Titta på tv - ett sätt att kommunicera2007In: Tidningen äldreomsorg, ISSN 1403-7025, no 4, p. 15-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lund University.
    User Evaluation and Application Assessment Report D6.1 for the EC Project GiraffPlus. Combining social interaction and long term monitoring for promoting independent living.2013Report (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lunds universitet.
    Vad ska tekniken användas till?2007In: Tidningen äldreomsorg, ISSN 1403-7025, no 4, p. 37-40Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 20.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lunds universitet.
    Vem tar hand om de äldre?: tekniska lösningar i äldreomsorgen2004In: Signum : katolsk orientering om kyrka, kultur, samhälle, ISSN 0347-0423, no 6, p. 14-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Östlund, Britt
    Lunds universitet.
    Äldres användning av teknik 2012In: Ä : en tidning för Riksföreningen sjuksköterskan inom äldrevård, ISSN 2001-1164, no 3, p. 58-59Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 22.
    Östlund, Britt
    et al.
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University.
    Lindén, Kjell.
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University.
    Turning older people's experiences into innovations: Ippi as the convergence of mobile services and TV viewing2011In: Gerontechnology, ISSN 1569-1101, E-ISSN 1569-111X, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 103-109Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Östlund, Britt
    et al.
    Department of Design Sciences, Lund University.
    Olsson, Annika
    Jönsson, Bodil
    The Liquid Drop Exposing and Utilising Difference in the Design Process2008In: Design Philosophy Papers, ISSN 1448-7136, E-ISSN 1448-7136, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 5-15(11)Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 23 of 23
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