Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Jansson, Inger
    et al.
    Department of Rehabilitation, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping; Nyckeln Competence Centre for Pedagogic in Healthcare, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar.
    Gunnarsson, Anna Birgitta
    Unit for Research and Development, Kronoberg County Council, Växjö.
    Björklund, Anita
    Department of Rehabilitation, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping.
    Brudin, Lars H.
    Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar; Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, University Hospital Linköping, Linköping.
    Perseius, Kent-Inge
    Nyckeln Competence Centre for Pedagogic in Healthcare, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar; Department of Neurobiology, Caring Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet.
    Problem-Based Self-care Groups Versus Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Persons on Sick Leave Due to Common Mental Disorders: A Randomised Controlled Study2015In: Journal of occupational rehabilitation, ISSN 1053-0487, E-ISSN 1573-3688, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 127-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To evaluate the interventional capacity of problem based method groups (PBM) regarding mental health and work ability compared to cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for persons on sick leave due to common mental disorders. Methods In a randomised controlled design the experimental group received PBM and the control group received CBT. Outcomes were measured by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), the Stress and Crisis Inventory 93 (SCI-93) and the Dialogue about Working Ability instrument (DOA). Results Twenty-two participants in the PBM group and 28 in the CBT group completed intervention. Both groups showed significant lower scores on the two HADS subscales. Regarding stress the PBM group showed significant decrease in one (out of three) subscales of SCI-93. The CBT group showed significant decrease on all subscales of SCI-93. Regarding work ability the PBM group showed significant higher scores on one of five subscales of DOA. The CBT group showed significant higher scores on four of five subscales of DOA. Between groups there were significant differences to the favour of CBT on one of two subscales of HADS, all three subscales of SCI-93 and on two of the five subscales of DOA. Conclusion PBM seem to be able to reduce anxiety- and depression symptoms. CBT showed to be superior to PBM in reducing symptoms in all aspects of mental health, except for anxiety, in which they seem equally effective. Regarding work ability CBT showed to be superior, with significant effect on more aspects compared to PBM.

  • 2.
    Jansson, Inger
    et al.
    Nyckeln Competence Centre for Pedagogic in Healthcare, Kalmar County Hospital; School of Health Sciences, Department of Rehabilitation, Jönköping.
    Perseius, Kent-Inge
    Nyckeln Competence Centre for Pedagogic in Healthcare, Kalmar County Hospital; Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Caring Sciences and Society.
    Gunnarsson, Anna Birgitta
    Unit for Research and Development, Kronoberg County Council, Växjö.
    Björklund, Anita
    School of Health Sciences, Department of Rehabilitation, Jönköping.
    Work and everyday activities: experiences from two interventions addressing people with common mental disorders.2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 295-304Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Lengthy sick leave makes demands on work ability enhancing interventions in primary health care. Problem-based method (PBM) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) are interventions aimed at people with common mental disorders. This study aimed to describe how individuals experienced interventions and the impact the interventions had on the individuals' ability to work and perform other everyday activities.

    METHOD: Fourteen women and two men, eight each from two interventions, were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: The analysis revealed one overarching theme: "Reaching safe ground or continuing to seek help". Four categories were identified: "From being passive to making one's own efforts in the rehabilitation process", "Being stuck on a treadmill or daring to change", "Evolving from routine to more aware behaviour", and "Fitting in or not fitting in with workplace situations".

    CONCLUSIONS: According to the participants, experiences from both PBM and CBT had a positive impact on their ability to work and perform other everyday activities in a more sustainable way. Reflecting on behaviour and achieving limiting strategies were perceived as helpful in both interventions, although varying abilities to incorporate strategies were described. In general, the results support the use of active coping-developing interventions rather than passive treatments.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf