Change search
Refine search result
1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Liebe-Harkort, Carola
    Stockholms universitet.
    A Viking Age Tumour2003In: Viking heritage magazine, ISSN 1403-7319, no 1, p. 17-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Liebe-Harkort, Carola
    Stockholms universitet.
    Bilaga 3. Osteologisk analys av A34, RAÄ 12, Vårby Gård, Huddinge sn2007In: En hög mitt i centrum: Undersökning av anläggning 34 vid fornlämning RAÄ 12 i Vårby Gård, Huddinge socken, Huddinge: Södertörns högskola, 2007, p. 39-43Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Liebe-Harkort, Carola
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för arkeologi och antikens kultur.
    Cave Canum2009In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 2, p. 33-36Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 4.
    Liebe-Harkort, Carola
    Stockholms universitet.
    Cribra orbitalia, sinusitis and linear enamel hypoplasia in Swedish Roman Iron Age adults and subadults2012In: International journal of osteoarchaeology, ISSN 1047-482X, E-ISSN 1099-1212, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 387-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cranial skeletal lesions as well as linear enamel hypoplasias were investigated in an Early Iron Age (0–260 A.D.) population from Sweden. The analyses included the study of maxillary- and frontal sinusitis, cribra orbitalia and enamel hypoplasias in order to investigate nutritional and environmental related stress as well as possible relation to oral health. A majority of both subadult and adult individuals exhibited maxillary sinusitis as well as cribra orbitalia. In contrast, linear enamel hypoplasias were not frequently noted, although, the highest frequencies were found among the subadult individuals. In seven cases (12.7%) there was a clear correlation between a periapical lesions and maxillary sinusitis. A significant correlation between maxillary sinusitis and frontal sinusitis was found among adult individuals. Sixty-eight percent of the adults showed lesions in both these regions. The least common combination in adults was cribra orbitalia and enamel hypoplasias where 7.7% only exhibited lesions in both these regions. The significantly higher incidence of this combination among subadults at Smörkullen suggests that this may have been related to life threatening conditions. Overall, the result showed that the individuals at Smörkullen foremost suffered from upper respiratory diseases as well as nutritional deficiency.

  • 5.
    Liebe-Harkort, Carola
    Stockholms universitet.
    Exceptional Rates of Dental Caries in a Scandinavian Early Iron Age Population - A Study of Dental Pathology at Alvastra, Östergötland, Sweden2012In: International journal of osteoarchaeology, ISSN 1047-482X, E-ISSN 1099-1212, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 168-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The dental status of Early Iron Age agricultural populations in Sweden has not been extensively documented. The aim of this study was to record caries status in human remains from an Early Iron Age burial ground, Smorkullen, at Alvastra, Ostergotland, Sweden. The study included 96 adults and 50 subadults and comprised 1794 permanent teeth in the adults and 468 permanent and 221 deciduous teeth in the subadults. The caries frequency was exceptionally high, afflicting most of the adults (92.6%): 46.2% of the teeth examined showed signs of caries disease. Most of the lesions were shallow. However, around 60% of the adult individuals had moderate and severe lesions, which probably had an immediate impact on health. Lesions were most common in the cervical region and this is probably related to dietary patterns where the starchy, sticky food tended to accumulate around the necks of the teeth. Children showed low caries frequency, whereas most juveniles (91.7%) were affected. Most of the teeth with alveolar bone loss showed no signs of cervical or root caries lesions. However, in cases of moderate and severe loss of alveolar bone, seen mostly in the older age group, the frequency of cervical and root lesions was higher. Few initial caries lesions were observed, indicating an aggressive pattern of disease in this population. The lack of gender-related differences suggests that the diet was similar for both sexes, across all age groups.

  • 6.
    Liebe-Harkort, Carola
    Stockholms universitet.
    Från middagsbordet till soptunnan: Djurben från forna måltider i Pompeji2011In: Medusa. Svensk tidsskrift för antiken, ISSN 0349-456X, no 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Liebe-Harkort, Carola
    Stockholms universitet.
    Järnåldersmänniskor led av dålig tandhälsa2011In: Tandläkartidningen, ISSN 0039-6982, no 5, p. 78-81Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Liebe-Harkort, Carola
    Stockholms universitet.
    Oral Disease and Health Patterns: Dental and Cranial Paleopathology of the Early Iron Age Population at Smörkullen in Alvastra, Sweden2010Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In skeletal remains of ancient populations, evidence of dental and craniofacial pathology is often well preserved in the form of lesions on the teeth or bones. Meticulous, detailed recording of these lesions provides baseline data on which a realistic assessment can be made of the probable impact of dental diseases and its sequelae on health of these earlier populations.

    In the present thesis, dental and cranial pathology were recorded in the remains of an Iron Age population, with special reference to the possible impact of such conditions on general health and well-being. The skeletal remains had been excavated early last century from the burial ground Smörkullen, Alvastra, Östergötland, in Eastern Central Sweden: osteological analyses showed that the material comprised the remains of 65 subadult individuals and 104 adult individuals of both sexes. The dental status of most of the adult individuals was poor. Calculus, periodontitis, moderate and severe carious lesions and periapical infections were recorded. In contrast, subadult showed less evidence of dental disease. The results indicate that the perception of health in adults was probably negatively affected by their poor oral status. The dental status of subadults, on the other hand, was unlikely to have had a negative impact on their general well-being. A sex difference was observed in the material, males tending to more ongoing disease than females. Overall, the frequencies of both dental and cranial pathologies increased with age.

    Caries frequency in the material was noticeable higher than in numerous other studies in Scandinavian populations. Although the high caries rates at Smörkullen may be attributable to a diet rich in carbohydrates, the result may to some extent have been influenced by observer experience. Caries rates in other populations are likely to be under-estimated in comparison with Smörkullen. However, methodological factors alone cannot not explain all the observed differences.

    The recording of cranial pathologies disclosed malnutrition and upper respiratory problems in all age groups in the Smörkullen material. This most certainly affected their well-being. In some cases the pathology observed was directly associated with life-threatening conditions. Analyses of combinations of pathologies suggest that a combination of linear enamel hypoplasias and cribra orbitalia, mainly observed in those who died before the age of fifteen, may have been related to a lower probability of survival. 

  • 9.
    Liebe-Harkort, Carola
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Ariastam, Cesar
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Vidana, Roberto
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Dawidson, Irena
    The National Board of Forensic Medicine.
    Ahlquist, Michael
    Karolinska Institutet.
    The Occurrence and Appearance of Periapical lesions in an Early Iron Age Population from SwedenManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Periapical lesions were recorded by both visual and radiographic examination in an Early Iron Age population from Alvastra, Östergötland, Sweden. Only those individuals with discernible bone destruction were included in the study. The study comprised 37 adult individuals from both sexes of a total of 90 adult individuals among the population, thus the prevalence of visual periapical lesions in the population was 41.1%. Out of 819 tooth sockets, 83 (10.1%) showed signs of periapical lesions, mainly caused by chronic inflammations. Cyst-like lesions were recorded in five cases of which four were in a possible acute phase. Around thirty-two percent of the periapical lesions were associated with severe carious. The corresponding rate for severe attrition was 14.4%. No significant difference in frequency of lesions was observed between sexes and age groups. The most affected tooth was the first maxillary molar followed by the first molar in the mandible. Radiographic examination proved useful in detecting additional pathological processes, other than those observed by visual examination.

  • 10.
    Liebe-Harkort, Carola
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Boman, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet.
    Brunnar och ben i Pompeji2006In: Benbiten, ISSN 1652-4667, no 1, p. 8-11Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Liebe-Harkort, Carola
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Ástvaldsdóttir, Álfheiður
    Karolinska institutet / University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Tranæus, Sofia
    Karolinska Institutet / Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care.
    Quantification of Dental Caries by Osteologist and Odontologists - A Validity and Reliability Study2010In: International journal of osteoarchaeology, ISSN 1047-482X, E-ISSN 1099-1212, Vol. 20, no Sep, p. 525-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As in modern populations, dental caries in early populations is linked to diet and general health. In order to record not only advanced disease states with frank cavitation of teeth but also early lesions, indicating the presence of the disease in a population, it is important that the archaeologist can correctly detect and classify lesions of varying severity. The present study compares and contrasts quantification of dental caries by osteologists and odontologists. Four osteologists and four odontologists undertook visual and radiographic inspection of 61 teeth from three different sources: medieval, 19th century and modern. Separate sets of criteria were applied to disclose observer confidence in detecting a lesion and in estimating lesion extent. For validation of visual assessments, the teeth were sectioned. Radiographic assessments were validated by a specialist in dental radiography. The results disclosed that the odontologists in general showed greater sensitivity than the osteologists, correctly identifying carious lesions, but the osteologists had higher specificity, correctly identifying healthy teeth. Thus, the osteologists tend to overlook carious lesions (under-diagnosis), while the odontologists tend to incorrectly record lesions in healthy teeth (over-diagnosis). For both osteologists and odontologists, correct assessment was poorer for radiographs than for visual inspection.

  • 12.
    Liebe-Harkort, Carola
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Ástvaldsdóttir, Álfheiður
    Karolinska institutet / University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland.
    Tranæus, Sofia
    Karolinska institutet / Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care.
    Visual and Radiographic Assessment of Dental Caries by Osteologists: A Validity and Reliability Study2011In: International journal of osteoarchaeology, ISSN 1047-482X, E-ISSN 1099-1212, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 55-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the skeletal remains of earlier populations, the presence and severity of dental caries preserves evidence about general health and diet. The quality of the data collected on dental caries is highly dependent on the diagnostic skills of the examining osteologist. A major barrier to more detailed data is reliance on visual inspection only. The present study compared quantification of carious lesions by osteologists, using both visual and radiographic inspection. Four osteologists with varying experience of caries diagnosis registered the presence and extent of dental caries on the crown and root surfaces of 61 teeth sourced from three different samples: Archaeological, Anthropological and Modern. The teeth were subsequently sectioned to provide a control or standard reference. The interobserver differences were calculated as sensitivity (observer correctness in identifying teeth with caries disease). The two observers with more experience of dental paleopathology showed higher agreement with the standard reference than the other two observers, i.e. they correctly diagnosed more carious lesions. The most pronounced interobserver difference was for radiographic inspection of root surfaces. The recordings by the two experienced observers conformed much more closely with the standard reference than those of the less experienced observers. The results confirm that experience has a major influence on practical observations in dental paleopathology. The quality of collected data on dental caries could be enhanced by improving osteologists’ knowledge of the disease process and the application of uniform, unambiguous criteria for registration of carious lesions.

1 - 12 of 12
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf