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  • 1.
    Hansson, Anna
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hillerås, Pernilla
    Sophiahemmet / Karolinska Institutet / Äldrecentrum.
    Forsell, Yvonne
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Well-Being in an Adult Swedish Population2005In: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 74, no 2, p. 313-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to see if earlier findings about factors associated with well-being could be replicated in a large population-based sample in Sweden. To the best of our knowledge, no research on well-being has been conducted on such a large population in a country, which by most standards is regarded as one of the most fortunate in the world. With its economic wealth and highly developed social welfare and health care system, Sweden is a country where the conditions for a high level of well-being would appear to be met. Methods: 10,441 randomly selected Swedish citizens, aged between 20 and 64 years, living in Stockholm County, completed a questionnaire covering issues such as demographics, social network and psychological well-being. The data were collected during the years 1998–2000. Results: Male gender, greater age, cohabiting, good childhood conditions, support from friends, sound financial situation and absence of negative life events were positively associated with well-being and explained 20% of the variance. Conclusion: The findings replicated earlier studies. Factors associated with well-being seem to remain the same, and are still explaining only a small part of the total variance, despite different measurements, time, sample sizes or country of origin. Therefore, research on well-being needs to take a new turn, by placing less focus on external factors and more focus on the internal factors, such as a person’s personality and coping strategies.

  • 2.
    Hansson, Anna
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hillerås, Pernilla
    Karolinska Institutet / Äldrecentrum, Stockholm / Sophiahemmet högskola.
    Forsell, Yvonne
    Karolinska Institutet.
    What Kind of Self-Care Strategies Do People Report Using and is There an Association with Well-Being?2005In: Social Indicators Research, ISSN 0303-8300, E-ISSN 1573-0921, Vol. 73, no 1, p. 133-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe what kind of self-care strategies people report using to improve or maintain their well-being. Furthermore, we also wanted to investigate whether reports of using self-care strategies were associated with well-being. Methods: A selected sample (n=871), aged between 20 and 64 years, living in Stockholm County, answered an open-ended question about self-care strategies. Well-being was assed using the WHO (Ten) well-being index. Results: Ten different categories were found. The most commonly reported self-care strategy was physical exercise, followed by social support and engaging in pleasurable activities. Physical exercise, social support, relaxation, and physical health were associated with a better well-being, social support being strongest correlated. Conclusion: The results suggest that reports of using certain self-care strategies are associated with a better well-being.

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