Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Hanpatchaiyakul, Kulnaree
    et al.
    School of Health Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University; Basic Concept of Nursing Practice Department, Boromarajonani College of Nursing Changwat Nonthaburi, Nonthaburi, Thailand.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College. School of Health Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University.
    Kijsompon, Jureerat
    Praboromarajchanok Institute for Health Workforce Development (PIHWD), Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, Thailand.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    School of Health Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University.
    Thai men’s experiences of alcohol addiction and treatment2014In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 7, p. 23712-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Hanpatchaiyakul, Kulnaree
    et al.
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University; Basic Concept of Nursing Practice Department, Boromarajonani College of Nursing Changwat Nonthaburi, Nonthaburi, Thailand.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Nursing and Care.
    Kijsomporn, Jureerat
    Praboromarajchanok Institute for Health Workforce Development, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, Thailand.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University.
    Barriers to successful treatment of alcohol addiction as perceived by healthcare professionals in Thailand: a Delphi study about obstacles and improvement suggestions2016In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 9, article id 31738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many Thai people experiencing alcohol addiction do not seek help, and those who do often have inadequate access to treatment. There are few research studies focusing on alcohol addiction treatment in Thailand.

    Objective: The purpose of the current study was to identify barriers to the treatment of alcohol addiction and to collect experts’ suggestions for improving treatment in Thailand. The Delphi technique was used to achieve consensual agreement among an expert panel within the field of alcohol addiction and treatment.

    Design: Three rounds of a Delphi survey were completed by a panel of experts in alcohol addiction, including physicians, nurses, social workers, psychologists, healthcare officers, and an Alcoholics Anonymous member. The open-ended answers provided by 34 experts in the first round resulted in 60 statements, which were later grouped into three themes. After three rounds of questionnaires, 51 statements were accepted as consensus.

    Results: Thirty-two experts participated in all three Delphi rounds. Over 80% of participants were particularly concerned about five obstacles to alcohol addiction treatment. The majority of suggestions from the expert panel were related to patients’ right to treatment and the national policy for reducing the negative effects of alcohol. According to the results of the present study, the experts suggested that the treatment of alcohol addiction should be continuous from primary care to tertiary care, and convenient pathways should be established in healthcare services. The experts would also like to increase the number of healthcare providers and improve their knowledge and skills in working with people experiencing alcohol addiction.

    Conclusions: Equal rights to health and treatment for people experiencing alcohol addiction in Thailand require policy improvements, as well as acceptance and awareness of alcohol addiction from both the public and policymakers.

  • 3.
    von Strauss, Eva
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Paillard-Borg, Stéphanie
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Saaristo, Panu
    International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), Geneva, Switzerland.
    Global nursing in an Ebola viral haemorrhagic fever outbreak: before, during and after deployment2017In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 1371427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nurses are on the forefront and play a key role in global disaster responses. Nevertheless, they are often not prepared for the challenges they are facing and research is scarce regarding the nursing skills required for first responders during a disaster situation.Objectives: To investigate how returnee nursing staff experienced deployment before, during and after having worked for the Red Cross at an Ebola Treatment Center in Kenema, West Africa, and to supply knowledge on how to better prepare and support staff for viral haemorrhagic fever outbreaks.Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional approach. Questionnaires were administered to nurses having worked with patients suffering from Ebola in 2014 and 2015. Data collection covered aspects of pre-, during and post-deployment on clinical training, personal health, stress management, leadership styles, socio-cultural exposure and knowledge transfer, as well as attitudes from others. Data was analysed using both quantitative and qualitative methods.Results: Response-rate was 88%: forty-four nurses from 15 different countries outside West Africa answered the questionnaire. The respondents identified the following needs for improvement: increased mental health and psychosocial support and hands-on coping strategies with focus on pre- and post-deployment; more pre-deployment task-oriented clinical training; and workload reduction, as exhaustion is a risk for safety.Conclusions: This study supplies knowledge on how to better prepare health care staff for future viral haemorrhagic fever outbreaks and other disasters. Participants were satisfied with their pre-deployment physical health preparation, whereas they stressed the importance of mental health support combined with psychosocial support after deployment. Furthermore, additional pre-clinical training was requested.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf