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  • 1.
    Linde, Anders
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet / Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Pettersson, Karin
    Karolinska Intitutet.
    Hagelberg, Linn
    Sophiahemmets Högskola.
    Georgsson, Susanne
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    "Better safe than sorry"-Reasons for consulting care due to decreased fetal movements2017In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 376-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Experience of reduced fetal movements is a common reason for consulting health care in late pregnancy. There is an association between reduced fetal movements and stillbirth.

    AIM: To explore why women decide to consult health care due to reduced fetal movements at a specific point in time and investigate reasons for delaying a consultation.

    METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed at all birth clinics in Stockholm during 2014, to women seeking care due to reduced fetal movements. In total, 3555 questionnaires were collected, 960 were included in this study. The open-ended question; "Why, specifically, do you come to the clinic today?" was analyzed using content analysis as well as the complementary question "Are there any reasons why you did not come to the clinic earlier?"

    RESULTS: Five categories were revealed: Reaching dead line, Receiving advice from health care professionals, Undergoing unmanageable worry, Contributing external factors and Not wanting to jeopardize the health of the baby. Many women stated that they decided to consult care when some time with reduced fetal movements had passed. The most common reason for not consulting care earlier was that it was a new experience. Some women stated that they did not want to feel that they were annoying, or be perceived as excessively worried. Not wanting to burden health care unnecessarily was a reason for prehospital delay.

    CONCLUSION: Worry about the baby is the crucial reason for consulting care as well as the time which has passed since the women first experienced decreased fetal movements.

  • 2.
    Ulfsdottir, Hanna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Saltvedt, Sissel
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Georgsson, Susanne
    Karolinska Institutet / Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Testing the waters: A cross-sectional survey of views about waterbirth among Swedish health professionals2019In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: For women with low risk births, waterbirth is an alternative that is requested and provided in approximately a hundred countries. However, in some countries, including Sweden, waterbirth is not generally available.

    AIM: To explore the experiences, knowledge and attitudes regarding waterbirth among midwives, obstetricians/gynaecologists and neonatologists.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Sweden, using a web-based survey distributed via The Swedish Association of Midwives and the Heads of department of all Swedish maternity wards between April and June 2016. The respondents (n = 1609) answered a combination of Likert-scale and open-ended questions. The responses were analysed with descriptive statistics and quantitative content analyses.

    FINDINGS: Both midwives and physicians stated a lack of experience, knowledge and clinical guidelines related to attending and assisting waterbirths. Overall, midwives had more positive attitudes to waterbirth (38.8% vs 4.5%) as well as towards providing and implementing waterbirth, compared to physicians (71.0% vs 14.9%). Midwives stated significantly more benefits and fewer risks for women and babies, compared to physicians who requested more evidence.

    CONCLUSIONS: Opinions regarding waterbirth are to some extent based on attitudes rather than actual experience and knowledge. There are diverse interpretations of the strength of evidence and a lack of updating in the research field of waterbirth. As waterbirth is requested by women, health professionals need to update their knowledge in this topic in order to give coherent and evidence-based information and care to prospective parents.

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