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  • 1.
    Chatchumni, Manaporn
    et al.
    Rangsit University, Pathumthani, Thailand.
    Namvongprom, Ampaporn
    Rangsit University, Pathumthani, Thailand.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Engagement and availability in shaping nurses’ management of postoperative pain: a qualitative study2018In: Electronic Physician, ISSN 2008-5842, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 7235-7242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies reporting inadequate nursing care for patients indicate that nurses are negatively affected in such situations, and research is needed to study nursing care in postoperative situations. Objective: To describe situations of postoperative pain management in a surgical ward in Thailand. Methods: A qualitative approach using the Critical Incident Technique was chosen to investigate situations of postoperative pain management from the perspective of surgical nurses in Thailand. Data were collected through multiple semi-structured interviews with nine nurses over a five-week period. Results: The situations of surgical nurses described three elements that heavily influenced the quality of postoperative pain management: engagement in a trustful nurse-patient relationship, availability of pain medication and nursing care when needed, and imbalance between meeting the patient’s needs and completing routine nursing duties. Conclusion: The results help to expand our understanding of how Thai nurses manage pain in postoperative situations and indicate areas that could be improved in terms of how nurses respond to patients’ pain. Nurses challenge existing guidelines and facilitate development of new nursing guidelines and/or policies in pain management.

  • 2.
    Chatchumni, Manaporn
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College. Rangsit University, Pathumthani, Thailand.
    Namvongprom, Ampaporn
    Rangsit University, Pathumthani, Thailand.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Exploring the different management structures in nurses responses and treating of patients’ postoperative pain: A qualitative triangulation study2019In: Electronic Physician, ISSN 2008-5842, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 7536--7543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nurses’ roles are an important aspect of their approaches to pain management and monitoring in the post-operative phase of recovery in a surgical ward. A barrier to successful pain management may be the nurse’s perceptions of the patient in pain, which are confounded by the patterns of communication within individual contexts. We need to study, grasp and understand the complexities of the pain management practice within the context of the surgical ward in order to be able to improve the practices and design appropriate interventions to help patients in need. Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore nurses’ postoperative pain management practices. Methods: This qualitative triangulation study was conducted in a surgical ward at a public hospital in Bangkok (Thailand) from 2012 to 2015. We applied four qualitative methods in the study: 1) observations in a postoperative pain management setting (100 hours); 2) in-depth interviews (12 nurses), 3) three focus group discussions (18 nurses), and 4) narratives relating to 69 critical incidents gathered during recurrent visits over a period of ten weeks (9 nurses). Content analysis, as outlined in grounded theory, was applied. Results: The 40 nursing staff made their observations of the participants by conducting go-along interviews while they worked in the surgical field. The group of nurses comprised of 20 females and 4 males, age-ranged between 21-49 years of age, and their nursing experience ranged from 1-28 years. From our analysis, nurses verified patients’ pain by using double- and triple-control methods to document and record it, thus managing pain by administrative procedures rather than being proactive in providing pain relief. Therefore, communication and information about the patients’ pain and subsequent treatment of postoperative pain caused delays that may hamper the adequate use of available analgesics for pain relief. Levels of experience in communicating between nurses, other professionals, and patients were a main cause of delays in treating and managing pain. Conclusion: The complex communication system that would improve the communication ways leads to better standards of practice and quality of care.

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