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  • 1.
    Bergkvist, Karin
    et al.
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Therapeutical Immunology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsen, Joacim
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Therapeutical Immunology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Johansson, Unn-Brit
    Sophiahemmet University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Jonas
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Therapeutical Immunology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svahn, Britt-Marie
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Therapeutical Immunology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hospital care or home care after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Patients’ experiences of care and support2013In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 389-395Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Treatment at home during the pancytopenic phase after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been an option for patients at our center since 1998. Earlier studies have shown that home care is safe and has medical advantages. In this study, we present patients’ experiences of care and support while being treated in hospital or at home during the acute post-transplantation phase.

    Method: Patients (n ¼ 41, 22 in hospital care and 19 in home care) answered the SAUC questionnaire at discharge (when home, or from hospital). Both statistical analysis and deductive content analysis were used.

    Results: The patients were highly satisfied with the care and support during the acute posttransplantation phase. Patients in home care were found to be more satisfied with care in general than patients in hospital care. The importance of safety, empathy, and encouragement from healthcare staff were expressed regardless of where care was given. Patients also felt that receipt of continuous, updated information during treatment was important and they had a strong belief in HSCT but were uncertain of the future regarding recovery.

    Conclusions: The main findings of this study were that in comparison to hospital care, home care does not appear to have a significant negative effect on patients’ experiences of care and support during the acute post-transplantation phase. In addition patients in home care felt safe, seen as a person and encouragement seem to empower the patients at home. Thus, this study may encourage other transplantation centers to provide home care if the patients want it.

  • 2.
    Bränström, Richard
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Insurance Medicine, Karolinska Institutet.
    Petersson, Lena-Marie
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Insurance Medicine, Karolinska Institutet.
    Saboonchi, Fredrik
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Insurance Medicine, Karolinska Institutet.
    Wennman-Larsen, Agneta
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Insurance Medicine, Karolinska Institutet; Sophiahemmet University.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Insurance Medicine, Karolinska Institutet.
    Physical activity following a breast cancer diagnosis: Implications for self-rated health and cancer-related symptoms.2015In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 680-685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Studies have consistently shown an association between physical activity and increased health and well-being after a cancer diagnosis. Nevertheless, large proportions of breast cancer survivors do not meet recommended levels of physical activity. The aim of this study was to describe physical activity levels during the first two years after being diagnosed with breast cancer, and to explore the predictive ability of physical inactivity on longer-term self-rated health, physical symptoms, and psychological distress.

    METHOD: Study participants were women recently having had a first breast cancer surgery at one of the three main hospitals in Stockholm between 2007 and 2009. A total of 726 women were included and responded to six questionnaire assessments during the 24 months following diagnosis.

    RESULTS: Less than one third of the participants were sufficiently physically active at baseline. Physical activity decreased after surgery, increased at 8 month follow-up, and subsequently decreased slightly during the subsequent follow-up period. Physical inactivity was related to reduced health, increased symptoms such as pain, depression, and anxiety.

    CONCLUSION: This study provides additional support for the beneficial consequences of being physically active after a breast cancer diagnosis and highlights a potential target for intervention. This study provides additional support showing that being physically active even at a very low level seems to result in health benefits. Physical activity should be encouraged among patients treated for breast cancer.

  • 3.
    Kullberg, Anna
    et al.
    Department of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    Larsen, Joacim
    Red Cross University College of Nursing. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Sharp, Lena
    Department of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm.
    ‘Why is there another person's name on my infusion bag?’ Patient safety in chemotherapy care: A review of the literature2013In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 228-235Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    Approximately 10% of all patients is in some way harmed by the health care system. Risk factors have been identified and patients with cancer are at high risk due to the seriousness of the disease, co-morbidity, often old age, high risk treatments such as chemo and radiotherapy. Therefore, a closer look on safety for patients undergoing chemotherapy is needed. The aim of this study was to identify and evaluate interventions for improved patientsafety in chemotherapy care.

    Method

    We undertook a review of the available evidence regarding interventions to improve patientsafety in relation to chemotherapy care.

    Results

    We found 12 studies describing the following interventions; 1) Computerized Prescription Order Entry (CPOE), 2) Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) and Lean Sigma, 3) Error reporting and surveillance systems, 4) Administration Checklist and 5) Education for nurses. Even if all five interventions showed positive effects in patientsafety, the evidence level is rather weak due to design, sample size and the difficulties involved measuring patient safety issues.

    Conclusions

    Three studies with fairly high evidence level showed that computerized chemotherapy prescriptions were significantly safer than manual prescriptions and could therefore be recommended. For the other remaining interventions, more research is needed to assess the effect on improved patient safety in chemotherapy care. There is a need for more rigorous studies with sophisticated design for generating evidence in the field.

  • 4.
    Kästel, Anne
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College. Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm.
    Enskär, Karin
    Jönköping Univ, Sch Hlth Sci, Dept Nursing Sci.
    Björk, Olle
    Karolinska Inst, Paediat Oncol Unit.
    Parents’ views on information in childhood cancer care2011In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 290-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose

    The aim of the study is to highlight parents’ views on information in childhood cancer care.

    Method

    A qualitative design, appropriate to gain a holistic view, has been chosen. Eight families with children diagnosed with cancer, of various ages and gender and from various backgrounds, participated in five interviews each during the first year of the child’s illness.

    Results

    If the parents’ needs were fulfilled, they were better equipped to handle the illness of their child, which is totally dependant on how the matter of information is dealt with. Information is a complex and demanding issue for the persons involved and the families’ views were divergent in this area. Sometimes they seemed to obtain the information successfully and sometimes there were great problems in this respect. Therefore their preferences must be considered.

    Conclusion

    There has to be an improvement from the aspects of what, when and how information is provided. The major findings of this study indicate that the families need better support and more distinct instructions to be able to cope with the situation.

  • 5.
    Lidén, Y.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Olofsson, N.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Landgren, O.
    Karolinska Institutet / Medical Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA.
    Johansson, Eva
    Red Cross University College of Nursing. Karolinska Institutet.
    Pain and anxiety during bone marrow aspiration/biopsy: Comparison of ratings among patients versus health-care professionals2012In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 323-329Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Saboonchi, Fredrik
    et al.
    Red Cross University College of Nursing. Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Petersson, Lena-Marie
    Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wennman-Larsen, Agneta
    Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Sophiahemmet University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Swede.
    Brännström, Richard
    Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vaez, Marjan
    Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Changes in caseness of anxiety and depression in breast cancer patients during the first year following surgery: Patterns of transiency and severity of the distress response.2014In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 598-604Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Psychological distress is prevalent in patients with breast cancer and is viewed as a non-pathological occurrence. Severe distress and mental disorder display a substantial overlap in both conceptual contexts and studies in oncological settings. A domain that may contribute to distinguishing non-pathological distress from signs of potential disorder is the transiency of distress.

    AIM: To examine the transiency of distress response in breast cancer patients by investigating the changes in clinical caseness of depression and anxiety during one year following surgery.

    METHODS: Data on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale from a cohort of 715 women with breast cancer on three assessments within one year following breast surgery were subjected to Generalized Estimation Equation Analysis, McNemar's test, and logistic regression.

    RESULTS: There was a significant decrease in the proportions of anxiety cases from baseline (37.7%) to 4 months (26.7%) but no significant change from 4 to 12 months. Caseness in depression significantly increased from baseline (18.5%) to 4 months (21.5%) but decreased to 15.3% at 12 months. Only experience of major adverse life events contributed to 12 months caseness of anxiety and depression beyond baseline caseness.

    DISCUSSION: The average decrease in caseness of anxiety and depression a year following surgery lends support to the view of distress as a transient non-pathological response. A subgroup of patients, however, displayed enduring or recurrent severe distress indicating the presence of potential disorder. The findings emphasize the importance of screening and follow up monitoring of distress.

  • 7.
    Wennman-Larsen, Agneta
    et al.
    Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet; Sophiahemmet University.
    Nilsson, Marie
    Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet; Department of Social Work, Karolinska University Hospital; Division of Social Work, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet.
    Saboonchi, Fredrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Public Health and Medicine. Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet.
    Olsson, Mariann
    Division of Social Work, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet.
    Fornander, Tommy
    Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet; Department of Oncology, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Sandelin, Kerstin
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet; Department of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Petersson, Lena-Marie
    Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet.
    Can breast cancer register data on recommended adjuvant treatment be used as a proxy for actually given treatment?2016In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 22, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 7 of 7
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