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  • 1.
    Kumpula, Esa
    et al.
    School of Health Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalens University .
    Ekstrand, Per
    Red Cross University College of Nursing.
    Challenges and Possibilities for Understanding Men's Health in Twenty-First Century Forensic Psychiatric Care2014In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 35, no 8, p. 613-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forensic psychiatric care in Sweden constitutes a specific institutional environment in health care in terms of gender and power relationships. This context emphasizes safety and protection in an environment where men constitute a majority of the patients and staff. It involves relationships among men's health, constructions of masculinities, and issues regarding equality between women's and men's caring work. The aim of this theoretical article is to problematize men's health in relation to constructions of masculinities. Our analysis shows how the perception of health is involved in the construction of masculinities and how this plays out in daily interactions between caregivers and patients.

  • 2.
    Kumpula, Esa
    et al.
    Department of Psychiatry, Forensic Psychiatric Hospital, Sala.
    Ekstrand, Per
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalens University, Västerås.
    Men and Masculinities in Forensic Psyciatric Care: An interview Study Concerning Male Nurses Experiences of Working with Male Caregivers and Male Patients2009In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, ISSN 0161-2840, Vol. 30, no 9, p. 538-546Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forensic psychiatric care is largely populated by men—as patients, caregivers, and nurses. Previous research has not focused on the meaning of gender in this context. The aim of this study is to analyse male nurses’ experiences of working with male caregivers and attending to male patients in forensic psychiatric care. Data were collected through interviews with sixmale nurses. The results consist of five themes. Protection and defence are key aspects of care and male caregivers gain status and authority through their physical strength. This could hamper caring and provide male caregivers with a superior position in the department.

  • 3.
    Saltzmann-Eriksson, Martin
    et al.
    Central Hospital, Division of Psychiatry, Västerås.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Mälardalen University, Department of Caring and Public Health Science, Eskilstuna.
    Encountering Touch: A Path to Affinity in Psychiatric Care.2005In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 26, no 8, p. 843-852Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    et al.
    Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Division of Mental Health and Addiction.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Mälardalens University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Eskilstuna.
    Panoptic Power and Mental Health Nursing: Space and Surveillance in Relation to Staff, Patients, and Neutral Places2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 8, p. 500-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health nurses use manifest and latent approaches for surveillance and observation of patients in the context of mental health care. Patient spaces in mental health organizations are subtly linked to these different means of surveillance. This article investigates these approaches, focusing in particular on the variety of spaces patients occupy and differences in the intensity of observation that can be carried out in them. The aim is to elaborate on space and surveillance in relation to the patients’ and nurses’ environment in psychiatric nursing care. Places where patients were observed were operationalized and categorized, yielding three spaces: those for patients, those for staff, and neutral areas. We demonstrate that different spaces produce different practices in relation to the exercise of panoptic power and that there is room for maneuvering and engaging in alternatives to “keeping an eye on patients” for nurses in mental health nursing. Some spaces offer asylum from panoptic observations and the viewing eyes of psychiatric nurses, but the majority of spaces in mental health nursing serve as a field of visibility within which the patient is constantly watched.

  • 5.
    Salzmann-Eriksson, Martin
    et al.
    Dalarna University School of Health and Sciences, Falun.
    Lutzen, Kim
    Ivarsson, Ann-Britt
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Mälardalens University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Eskilstuna.
    Achieving equilibrium within a culture of stability: Cultural knowing in nursing care on psychiatric intensive care units2011In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 255-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents intensive psychiatric nurses' work and nursing care. The aim of the study was to describe expressions of cultural knowing in nursing care in psychiatric intensive care units (PICU). Spradley's ethnographic methodology was applied. Six themes emerged as frames for nursing care in psychiatric intensive care: providing surveillance, soothing, being present, trading information, maintaining security and reducing. These themes are used to strike a balance between turbulence and stability and to achieve equilibrium. As the nursing care intervenes when turbulence emerges, the PICU becomes a sanctuary that offers tranquility, peace and rest.

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