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  • 1.
    Blomberg, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Bisholt, Birgitta
    The Swedish Red Cross University College. Karlstad University.
    Clinical group supervision for integrating ethical reasoning: Views from students and supervisors.2016In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 23, no 7, p. 761-769Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Clinical group supervision has existed for over 20 years in nursing. However, there is a lack of studies about the role of supervision in nursing students' education and especially the focus on ethical reasoning.

    AIM: The aim of this study was to explore and describe nursing students' ethical reasoning and their supervisors' experiences related to participation in clinical group supervision.

    RESEARCH DESIGN: The study is a qualitative interview study with interpretative description as an analysis approach.

    PARTICIPANTS AND RESEARCH CONTEXT: A total of 17 interviews were conducted with nursing students (n = 12) who had participated in clinical group supervision in their first year of nursing education, and with their supervisors (n = 5).

    ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS: The study was based on the ethical principles outlined in the Declaration of Helsinki, and permission was obtained from the Regional Ethical Review Board in Sweden.

    FINDINGS: The analysis revealed that both the form and content of clinical group supervision stimulated reflection and discussion of handling of situations with ethical aspects. Unethical situations were identified, and the process uncovered underlying caring actions.

    DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Clinical group supervision is a model that can be used in nursing education to train ethical reflection and to develop an ethical competence among nursing students. Outcomes from the model could also improve nursing education itself, as well as healthcare organizations, in terms of reducing moral blindness and unethical nursing practice.

  • 2.
    Mattsson, Janet Yvonne
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet; Sachsska Barnsjukhuset.
    Forsner, Maria
    Högskolan Dalarna, Omvårdnad.
    Castrén, Maaret
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet; Sachsska Barnsjukhuset.
    Arman, Maria
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet; Sachsska Barnsjukhuset.
    Caring for children in pediatric intensive care units: An observation study focusing on nurses' concerns2013In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 528-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children in the pediatric intensive care unit are indisputably in a vulnerable position, dependent on nurses to acknowledge their needs. It is assumed that children should be approached from a holistic perspective in the caring situation to meet their caring needs. The aim of the study was to unfold the meaning of nursing care through nurses’ concerns when caring for children in the pediatric intensive care unit. To investigate the qualitative aspects of practice embedded in the caring situation, the interpretive phenomenological approach was adopted for the study. The findings revealed three patterns: medically oriented nursing—here, the nurses attend to just the medical needs, and nursing care is at its minimum, leaving the children’s needs unmet; parent-oriented nursing care—here, the nursing care emphasizes the parents’ needs in the situation, and the children are viewed as a part of the parent and not as an individual child with specific caring needs; and smooth operating nursing care orientation—here, the nursing care is focused on the child as a whole human being, adding value to the nursing care. The conclusion drawn suggests that nursing care does not always respond to the needs of the child, jeopardizing the well-being of the child and leaving them at risk for experiencing pain and suffering. The concerns present in nursing care has been shown to be the divider of the meaning of nursing care and need to become elucidated in order to improve the cultural influence of what can be seen as good nursing care within the pediatric intensive care unit.

  • 3.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    et al.
    Mälardalen University; Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Ericson-Lidman, Eva
    Umeå University.
    Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali
    Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Ersta Sköndal University College; University of Gothenburg.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University; Ersta Sköndal University College.
    Clear conscience grounded in relations: Expressions of Persian-speaking nurses in Sweden2017In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 349-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Conscience is an important concept in ethics, having various meanings in different cultures. Because a growing number of healthcare professionals are of immigrant background, particularly within the care of older people, demanding multiple ethical positions, it is important to explore the meaning of conscience among care providers within different cultural contexts.

    RESEARCH OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to illuminate the meaning of conscience by enrolled nurses with an Iranian background working in residential care for Persian-speaking people with dementia.

    RESEARCH DESIGN: A phenomenological hermeneutical method guided the study.

    PARTICIPANTS AND RESEARCH CONTEXT: A total of 10 enrolled nurses with Iranian background, aged 33-46 years, participated in the study. All worked full time in residential care settings for Persian-speaking people with dementia in a large city, in Sweden.

    ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS: The study was approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board for ethical vetting of research involving humans. Participants were given verbal and written study information and assured that their participation was voluntary and confidential.

    FINDINGS: Three themes were constructed including perception of conscience, clear conscience grounded in relations and striving to keep a clear conscience. The conscience was perceived as an inner guide grounded in feelings, which is dynamic and subject to changes throughout life. Having a clear conscience meant being able to form a bond with others, to respect them and to get their confirmation that one does well. To have a clear conscience demanded listening to the voice of the conscience. The enrolled nurses strived to keep their conscience clear by being generous in helping others, accomplishing daily tasks well and behaving nicely in the hope of being treated the same way one day.

    CONCLUSION: Cultural frameworks and the context of practice needed to be considered in interpreting the meaning of conscience and clear conscience.

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