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  • 1.
    Paillard-Borg, Stéphanie
    et al.
    Aging Research Center (ARC), Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm.
    Fratiglioni, L
    Aging Research Center (ARC), Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm.
    Xu, W
    Aging Research Center (ARC), Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm.
    Winblad, B
    Aging Research Center (ARC), Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm.
    Wang, H-X
    Aging Research Center (ARC), Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm.
    An active lifestyle postpones dementia onset by more than one year in very old adults2012Inngår i: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 31, nr 4, s. 835-842Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that an active lifestyle delays age at dementia onset. This study included 388 incident dementia cases (DSM-III-R criteria) that developed over a 9-year follow-up period among 1,375 baseline dementia-free community dwellers with good cognitive function (MMSE >23) (mean age = 81.2) from the Kungsholmen Project. An active lifestyle was defined as participation in mental, physical, or social activity. We used linear regression models to estimate influence of baseline active lifestyle on age at onset of incident dementia and general linear models to estimate mean age at dementia onset. Age at onset of dementia was significantly older in persons who had higher levels of participation in mental, physical, or social activity (β: 0.18, 0.29 and 0.23 respectively, p < 0.001 for all the activities) independent of education, medical condition, functional status, and other confounders including APOE. When the three types of activities were integrated into an index, we found that the broader the spectrum of participation in the activities, the later the onset of disease (β = 0.93, p = 0.01 for participating in two activities, and β = 1.42, p < 0.001 for three activities). There were 17 months difference in mean age at dementia onset between the inactive group and the most active group. An active lifestyle operates as a protective factor for dementia by delaying the clinical onset of the disease. These findings highlight the relevance of encouraging old adults to have active lifestyles, which could have a great impact on public health.

  • 2.
    Wimo, Anders
    et al.
    Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University / Uppsala University.
    Sjölund, Britt-Marie
    Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University / University of Gävle.
    Sköldunger, Anders
    Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University.
    Qiu, Chengxuan
    Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University.
    Klarin, Inga
    Karolinska University Hospital / Karolinska Institutet.
    Nordberg, Gunilla
    The Swedish Dementia Centre.
    Strauss, Eva von
    Röda Korsets Högskola, Avdelningen Medicin och Folkhälsa. Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University.
    Cohort Effects in the Prevalence and Survival of People with Dementia in a Rural Area in Northern Sweden2015Inngår i: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 50, nr 2, s. 387-396Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies suggest that trends in cardiovascular risk may result in a decrease in age-specific prevalence of dementia. Studies in rural areas are rare.

    OBJECTIVES: To study cohort effects in dementia prevalence and survival of people with dementia in a Swedish rural area.

    METHODS: Participants were from the 1995-1998 Nordanstig Project (NP) (n = 303) and the 2001-2003 Swedish National study on Aging and Care in Nordanstig (SNAC-N) (n = 384). Overall 6-year dementia prevalence and mortality in NP and SNAC-N were compared for people 78 years and older. Logistic regression analyses were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for dementia occurrence using the NP study population as the reference group. Cox regression models were used to analyze time to death.

    RESULTS: The crude prevalence of dementia was 21.8% in NP and 17.4% in SNAC-N. When the NP cohort was used as the reference group, the age- and gender-adjusted OR of dementia was 0.71 (95% CI 0.48-1.04) in SNAC-N; the OR was 0.47 (0.24-0.90) for men and 0.88 (0.54-1.44) for women. In the extended model, the OR of dementia was significantly lower in SNAC-N than in the NP cohort as a whole (0.63; 0.39-0.99) and in men (0.34; 0.15-0.79), but not in women (0.81; 0.46-1.44). The Cox regression models indicated that the hazard ratio of dying was lower in the SNAC-N than NP population.

    CONCLUSIONS: Trends toward a lower prevalence of dementia in high-income countries seem to be evident in this Swedish rural area, at least in men.

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