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  • 1.
    Ekdahl, Susanne
    et al.
    Nyckeln Competence Center for Pedagogics in Healthcare, Kalmar County Hospital.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Department of Care Science, Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Department of Intensive Care and Perioperative Medicine, Skåne University Hospital.
    Perseius, Kent-Inge
    Red Cross University College of Nursing. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet.
    Family skills training in dialectical behaviour therapy: The experience of the significant others2014In: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, ISSN 0883-9417, E-ISSN 1532-8228, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 235-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim was to describe significant others’ experiences of dialectical behaviour therapy- family skills training (DBT-FST), their life situation before and after DBT-FST, and measurement of their levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms. Methods: The study had a descriptive mixed method design. Data were collected with free text questionnaires (n= 44), group interviews (n= 53) and the HAD scale (n= 52) and analysed by qualitative content analysis and descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: The results show that life before DBT-FST was a struggle. DBT-FST gave hope for the future and provided strategies, helpful in daily life. For the subgroup without symptoms of anxiety and depression before DBT-FST, anxiety increased significantly. For the subgroup with symptoms of anxiety and depression the symptoms decreased significantly. This indicates, despite increased anxiety for one group, that DBT-FST is a beneficial intervention and most beneficial for those with the highest anxiety- and depressive symptoms.

  • 2.
    Ekdahl, Susanne
    et al.
    Nyckeln Competence Center for Pedagogics in Healthcare, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Samuelsson, Mats
    Perseius, Kent-Inge
    Department of Health Science, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm.
    A Life Tiptoeing: Being a Significant Other to Persons With Borderline Personality Disorder2011In: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, ISSN 0883-9417, E-ISSN 1532-8228, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 69-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to describe significant others' experiences of living close to a person with borderline personality disorder and their experience of encounter with psychiatric care.

    Methods

    Data were collected by free-text questionnaires and group interviews and were analyzed by qualitative content analysis.

    Results and Conclusion

    The results revealed four categories: a life tiptoeing; powerlessness, guilt, and lifelong grief; feeling left out and abandoned; and lost trust. The first two categories describe the experience of living close to a person with BPD, and the last two categories describe encounter with psychiatric care.

  • 3.
    Perseius, Kent-Inge
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Psychiatry Center, Karolinska Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Ekdahl, Susanne
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet.
    Asberg, Marie
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet.
    Samuelsson, Mats
    Red Cross University College of Nursing.
    To tame a volcano: patients with borderline personality disorder and their perceptions of suffering2005In: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, ISSN 0883-9417, E-ISSN 1532-8228, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 160-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to investigate life situations, suffering, and perceptions of encounter with psychiatric care among 10 patients with borderline personality disorder. The results are based on a hermeneutic interpretation of narrative interviews in addition to biographical material (diary excerpts and poems). The interpretation revealed three comprehensive theme areas: life on the edge , the struggle for health and dignity-a balance act on a slack wire over a volcano , and the good and the bad act of psychiatric care in the drama of suffering . These theme areas form a movement back and forth-from despair and unendurable suffering to struggle for health and dignity and a life worth living. Common beliefs regarding these patients among personnel and implications for psychiatric care are discussed in relation to the results.

  • 4.
    Perseius, Kent-Inge
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Psychiatry Center, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm.
    Ojehagen, Agneta
    Lund University, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Division of Psychiatry, University Hospital, Lund.
    Ekdahl, Susanne
    Kalmar University, Department of Health and Behavioural Science, Psychology Section, Kalmar.
    Asberg, Marie
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Psychiatry Center, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm.
    Samuelsson, Mats
    Red Cross University College of Nursing.
    Treatment of suicidal and deliberate self-harming patients with borderline personality disorder using dialectical behavioral therapy: the patients’ and the therapists’ perceptions.2003In: Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, ISSN 0883-9417, E-ISSN 1532-8228, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 218-227Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to investigate patients and therapists perception of receiving and giving dialectical behavioral therapy (DBT). Ten deliberate self-harm patients with borderline personality disorder and four DBT-therapists were interviewed. The interviews were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. The patients unanimously regard the DBT-therapy as life saving and something that has given them a bearable life situation. The patients and the therapists are concordant on the effective components of the therapy: the understanding, respect, and confirmation in combination with the cognitive and behavioral skills. The experienced effectiveness of DBT is contrasted by the patient's pronouncedly negative experiences from psychiatric care before entering DBT.

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