Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Brenner, Philip
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet; Center for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset.
    Mittendorfer-Rutz, Ellenor
    Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet.
    Jokinen, Jussi
    Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet; Center for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset; Department of Clinical Sciences, Umeå University.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Division of Insurance Medicine, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet.
    Hillert, Jan
    Division of Neurology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet.
    Tinghög, Petter
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Public Health and Medicine.
    Prescribed psychiatric medication among multiple sclerosis patients before and after disability pension: a register study with matched controls.2016In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 51, no 7, p. 1047-1054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Many multiple sclerosis (MS) patients of working ages have psychiatric comorbidity, and 60 % are on disability pension (DP). It is unknown how DP is associated with MS patients' mental health. The objective of this study was to investigate the association between prescriptions of psychiatric medication and time before and after receiving full-time DP in MS patients compared with matched controls.

    METHODS: Nationwide Swedish registers were used to identify 3836 MS patients who were granted DP in 2000-2012 and 19,180 DP controls matched on socio-demographic variables by propensity scores. Patients and controls were organized in groups by year granted DP. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for being prescribed selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), benzodiazepines, or sleeping agents in 2006.

    RESULTS: Both patients and controls, who were not yet on DP in the study year of 2006, had lower OR compared with those who were granted DP in the same year. The OR increased when being closer to DP. MS patients, who had been granted DP 5-6 years earlier, had a higher risk for prescription of benzodiazepines (OR 1.72; 95 % CI 1.16-2.57) than controls (OR 1.14; 95 % CI 1.14-1.18). These patients also had a higher risk for SSRI prescription when compared directly with controls (OR 1.76; 95 % CI 1.44-2.15).

    CONCLUSIONS: MS patients have substantially higher odds ratios for being prescribed psychiatric drugs after DP than other disability pensioners. Further research on the association of DP with the mental health of MS patients is warranted.

  • 2.
    Tinghög, Petter
    et al.
    Tema Health and Society, Dept. of Health and Society, Linköping University.
    Hemmingsson, Tomas
    National Institute for Working Life, Stockholm; Division of Occupational Health, Dept. of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute .
    Lundberg, Ingvar
    National Institute for Working Life, Stockholm; Division of Occupational Health, Dept. of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institute.
    To what extent may the association between immigrant status and mental illness be explained by socioeconomic factors?2007In: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, ISSN 0933-7954, E-ISSN 1433-9285, Vol. 42, no 12, p. 990-996Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Immigrants in Sweden have a higher rate of mental illness than the native Swedes. This study investigated to what extent the association between immigrant status and mental illness can be explained by a different distribution of known risk factors for impaired mental health between groups of immigrants and persons born in Sweden.

    METHODS: The study is based on data from the Swedish PART-study, designed to identify risk factors for, and social consequences of, mental illness. The study population consists of a random sample of 10,423 Swedish citizens, whereof 1,109 were immigrants. The data was collected in the year 2000. The immigrants were divided into three groups based on country of origin (Scandinavians born outside Sweden, Europeans born outside Scandinavia, non-Europeans). The occurrence of mental illness among immigrants and native Swedes were compared not adjusting and adjusting for indicators of socioeconomic advantage/disadvantage (education, income, labour market position, etc). Mental illness was approximated with the WHO (ten) wellbeing index scale and depressive symptoms were measured with the major depression inventory scale (MDI).

    RESULTS: Immigrants' excess risk for low subjective wellbeing was completely accounted for by adjustment for known risk factors in all the immigrant groups. However, social-economic disadvantages could not account for the non-European immigrants' higher prevalence of depression (MDI), although the increased relative risk found in univariate analyses was substantially reduced.

    CONCLUSIONS: The findings in this study suggest that the association between immigrant status and mental illness appears above all to be an effect of a higher prevalence of social and economic disadvantage.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf