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  • 1.
    Ardalan, A.
    et al.
    Department of Health in Emergencies and Disasters, National Institute of Health Research, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Disaster Public Health Department, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran..
    Mazaheri, Monir
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet;Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Vanrooyen, M.
    Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
    Mowafi, H.
    Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA; Department of Emergency Medicine, Boston University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
    Nedjat, S.
    Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Knowledge Utilization Research Centre, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Naieni, K. H.
    Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Russel, M.
    Iranian Research Centre on Ageing at the University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Post-disaster quality of life among older survivors five years after the Bam earthquake: implications for recovery policy2011In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 179-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older people are among the most vulnerable in major disasters. In their aftermath, it is crucial to institute efforts that will maintain a high level of elders' quality of life (QoL). This paper presents QoL assessments of elderly survivors five years after the Bam earthquake in Iran, and evaluates the determinants. A cross-sectional analysis of 210 randomly-selected survivors was carried out in 2008 using the WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire. A comparison of the results with data on the general population showed that experiencing the earthquake may adversely affect psychological dimensions of QoL even five years after, but paradoxically the earthquake resulted in better social relationships in affected communities than in the general population. Lower QoL associated with female gender, higher age, living alone, severe earthquake-related injury, poor quality of living conditions, increased dependency in the activities of daily living, living in an urban area, and being temporarily housed. Recovery experts and donors should carry out long-term monitoring of health status and QoL in disaster-affected communities, with a focus on psychological wellbeing. Intervention programmes that emphasise post-disaster quality of care and satisfactory housing may lead to better QoL of the victims and may shorten the recovery phase.

  • 2.
    Ardalan, Ali
    et al.
    School of Public Health and Institute of Public Health Research, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran..
    Mazaheri, Monir
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute; Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran..
    Kourosh, Holakouie Naieni
    School of Public Health and Institute of Public Health Research, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran..
    Rezaie, Mohsen
    School of Public Health and Institute of Public Health Research, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Teimoori, Fariba
    Iranian Research Centre on Ageing, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Pourmalek, Farshad
    Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Older people´s needs following major disasters: a qualitative study of Iranian elders´ experiences of the Bam earthquake2010In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 11-23Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Ardalan, Ali
    et al.
    Health in Emergencies and Disasters Department, National Institute of Health Research, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; Disaster Public Health Department, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute; Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Mowafi, Hani
    Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts USA; Department of Emergency Medicine, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts USA.
    VanRooyen, Michael
    Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts USA.
    Teimoori, Fariba
    Iranian Research Centre on Aging, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran; School of Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Abbasi, Reza
    Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran.
    Impact of the Bam Earthquake, 26 December 2003, on Activities of Daily Living and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living of Older People2011In: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine, ISSN 1049-023X, E-ISSN 1945-1938, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 99-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: This study compares self-reported Activities of Daily Living (ADL) and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) status among elderly survivors of the 2003 Bam Earthquake before, two months after, and five years after the event, and explores related determinants.

    METHODS: A two-stage cluster survey was conducted on 210 elderly survivors in the earthquake-stricken area five years after the event.

    RESULTS: Both ADL and IADL scores decreased two months after earthquake compared to prior status (p <0.001). No differences were observed between two months and five years after the event (p >0.05). Access to medical services were not related to level of ADL or IADL (p = 0.52 and p = 0.74, respectively). Elderly survivors with lower functional capability in terms of ADL experienced more problems in access to relief items (p = 0.04), but no similar association was found for IADL (p = 0.26).

    CONCLUSION: The Bam earthquake adversely affected functional capacity of the elderly. Disaster responders must take into account functional capacity of elders when planning for medical and relief operations.

  • 4.
    Chatchumni, Manaporn
    et al.
    Rangsit University, Pathumthani, Thailand.
    Namvongprom, Ampaporn
    Rangsit University, Pathumthani, Thailand.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Engagement and availability in shaping nurses’ management of postoperative pain: a qualitative study2018In: Electronic Physician, ISSN 2008-5842, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 7235-7242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies reporting inadequate nursing care for patients indicate that nurses are negatively affected in such situations, and research is needed to study nursing care in postoperative situations. Objective: To describe situations of postoperative pain management in a surgical ward in Thailand. Methods: A qualitative approach using the Critical Incident Technique was chosen to investigate situations of postoperative pain management from the perspective of surgical nurses in Thailand. Data were collected through multiple semi-structured interviews with nine nurses over a five-week period. Results: The situations of surgical nurses described three elements that heavily influenced the quality of postoperative pain management: engagement in a trustful nurse-patient relationship, availability of pain medication and nursing care when needed, and imbalance between meeting the patient’s needs and completing routine nursing duties. Conclusion: The results help to expand our understanding of how Thai nurses manage pain in postoperative situations and indicate areas that could be improved in terms of how nurses respond to patients’ pain. Nurses challenge existing guidelines and facilitate development of new nursing guidelines and/or policies in pain management.

  • 5.
    Chatchumni, Manaporn
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College. Rangsit University, Pathumthani, Thailand.
    Namvongprom, Ampaporn
    Rangsit University, Pathumthani, Thailand.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Exploring the different management structures in nurses responses and treating of patients’ postoperative pain: A qualitative triangulation study2019In: Electronic Physician, ISSN 2008-5842, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 7536--7543Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nurses’ roles are an important aspect of their approaches to pain management and monitoring in the post-operative phase of recovery in a surgical ward. A barrier to successful pain management may be the nurse’s perceptions of the patient in pain, which are confounded by the patterns of communication within individual contexts. We need to study, grasp and understand the complexities of the pain management practice within the context of the surgical ward in order to be able to improve the practices and design appropriate interventions to help patients in need. Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore nurses’ postoperative pain management practices. Methods: This qualitative triangulation study was conducted in a surgical ward at a public hospital in Bangkok (Thailand) from 2012 to 2015. We applied four qualitative methods in the study: 1) observations in a postoperative pain management setting (100 hours); 2) in-depth interviews (12 nurses), 3) three focus group discussions (18 nurses), and 4) narratives relating to 69 critical incidents gathered during recurrent visits over a period of ten weeks (9 nurses). Content analysis, as outlined in grounded theory, was applied. Results: The 40 nursing staff made their observations of the participants by conducting go-along interviews while they worked in the surgical field. The group of nurses comprised of 20 females and 4 males, age-ranged between 21-49 years of age, and their nursing experience ranged from 1-28 years. From our analysis, nurses verified patients’ pain by using double- and triple-control methods to document and record it, thus managing pain by administrative procedures rather than being proactive in providing pain relief. Therefore, communication and information about the patients’ pain and subsequent treatment of postoperative pain caused delays that may hamper the adequate use of available analgesics for pain relief. Levels of experience in communicating between nurses, other professionals, and patients were a main cause of delays in treating and managing pain. Conclusion: The complex communication system that would improve the communication ways leads to better standards of practice and quality of care.

  • 6.
    Chatchumni, Manaporn
    et al.
    Rangsit University, Thailand .
    Namvongprom, Ampaporn
    Rangsit University, Thailand .
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Nursing and Care.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Nursing and Care.
    Treating without Seeing: Pain Management Practice in a Thai Context2016In: Pain Research & Management, ISSN 1203-6765, E-ISSN 1918-1523, article id 9580626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pain management is a core nursing function, and it plays a key role in postoperative care. It is important to understand the cultural context of nursing practices and how this affects effective pain management. The aim of this study was to describe the professional and cultural framework within which pain management is practiced on a Thai surgical ward. Spradley’s ethnographic methodology was used. Data were collected through 98.5 hours of field observations and interviews at a surgical ward in Thailand. Three themes were constructed that describe the way Thai nurses practiced pain management: (i) complex communications system to address pain and to respond to it, (ii) the essence of Thai-ness, and (iii) a passive approach to pain management. The results indicate that, in the response to discomfort and pain, better pain management will result if there is a shift from functional to patient-centered care. The nursing culture needs to be further researched and discussed, in order to set priorities in line with the goals of national and international organizations for improving postoperative care and promoting patient comfort

  • 7.
    Chatchumni, Manaporn
    et al.
    Rangsit University.
    Namvongprom, Ampaporn
    Rangsit University .
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Nursing and Care.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Nursing and Care.
    Using Critical Incident Technique to understand pain management situations in Thailand2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nursing care is an important concern in the field of pain management as it addresses situated efforts to achieve a person-centered care in pain management. Although it is clear that the effectiveness of the pain management practice needs to be improved, there is limited knowledge about the pain management practices of Thai nurses. This study address if Critical Incident Technique be a used to increase our understanding of Pain management in a Thai context.

    Methods: Critical Incident Technique was used to explore postoperative pain management provided by nurses in a surgical ward in Thailand. A purposive sample of nine registered nurses over a five-week period using a semi-structured interview guide were conducted and collected. 

    Findings: All 69 situations were used to illustrate the successful and unsuccessful aspects of managing postoperative pain, and included Engagement is a manner of commitments, Availability is characteristic in the practicalities of managing pain for the patients, and Imbalance is being inconsistency between the patients' needs and nurses maintain their undertaking routines. 

    Discussion: Nurses’ experience helped to grasp and understand how nurses treat pain in the postoperative setting; this study was conducted in order to further the understanding of this topic. The result show that Critical Incident Technique can serve to expand our knowledge how existing guidelines are facilitated by nurses. Further, the knowledge gained can serve as foundation to development of new nursing guidelines and/or policies in pain management, including improving nursing skills and education programs in pain management settings. 

  • 8.
    Chatchumni, Manaporn
    et al.
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna- Västerås.
    Namvongprom, Ampaporn
    School of Nursing, Rangsit University, Thailand.
    Sandborgh, Maria
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna- Västerås.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna- Västerås.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Nursing and Care.
    Nurses’ Perceptions of Patients in Pain and Pain Management: A Focus Group Study in Thailand2015In: Pacific Rim international journal of nursing research, ISSN 1906-8107, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 164-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Thailand, nurses have a key role in the assessment of symptoms and advising on pain management in patients with post-operative in a surgical ward. This study provides insight into nurses’ perceptions of patients in pain and subsequent pain management. A focus group discussion method was used with 18 registered nurses working in surgical wards. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis.The participants’ descriptions of their perceptions of patients in pain and pain management were condensed into four themes. Two themes revolved around their perceptions of patient pain, uncomfortable patient, and restricted mobility and changed mood. The two remaining themes comprised intolerable pain would be managed, and managing pain through our own experience seems to be of importance in their professional assumption that evidence-based practice is inadequate for patients’ postoperative care. It is suggested that nurses work to a organized pain assessment guideline and pain management models according to cultural contexts. This should be developed within an understanding of the nurse-patient relationship, and specifically holistic nursing models of care can play an important role in bridging the connection between training and practice, not only between personal and professional perceptions of pain and selected strategies, but also between professional knowledge and nurses’ perceptions of patients in pain.The findings may have relevance for other similar contexts and settings.

  • 9.
    Ehrlich, Kethy
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institute; Department of Geriatric Medicine, Danderyd Hospital.
    Boström, Anne-Marie
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institute; Department of Geriatric Medicine, Danderyd Hospital.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Division of Caring Sciences, Mälardalen University.
    Heikkilä, Kristiina
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institute.
    Emami, Azita
    Aging Research Center (ARC), Karolinska Institute; Biobehavioral Nursing & Health Systems, School of Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
    Family caregivers’ assessments of caring for a relative with dementia: A comparison of urban and rural areas2015In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 27-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This study aimed to describe and compare urban and rural family caregivers' reactions to caring for a relative with dementia and to examine the associations between caregiving and socio-demographic factors.

    BACKGROUND: Most studies on family caregivers' experiences caring for older people with dementia have been conducted in urban areas, and little is known about the experiences of family caregivers living in rural areas.

    DESIGN: A cross-sectional study design was used.

    METHODS: A total of 102 caregivers (response rate 85%) from urban (n=57) and rural (n=46) areas completed the Caregiver Reaction Assessment (CRA) Scale and demographic information. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics and linear regression models.

    RESULTS: Overall, family caregivers reported high satisfaction even if they also reported high impact on finances and daily living. Rural caregivers experienced a higher negative impact on finances but reported more support from family members than urban caregivers. Age, gender and relationship were significantly associated with four of the five CRA subscales. Educational level and geographical setting were not associated with any of the CRA subscales.

    CONCLUSIONS: The results of the study raise questions about the financial situation of older female caregivers and on the expectations of built-in family structures in urban and rural areas. Further studies focusing on the meaning and constitution of a family would help us to understand how these factors influence family caregiving both in rural and urban areas.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: To provide person-centred care and to avoid stereotyped caregiving, a better picture of traditions in family caregiving can improve a more differentiated and appropriate professional caregiving pliable with the cultural context in which it is carried out.

  • 10.
    Emami, Azita
    et al.
    Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet; Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation .
    Mazaheri, Monir
    Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet; Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Science, Iran .
    Difficulties in recruiting participants for a research study on immigrant dementia caregivers: Challenges in conducting research with a culturally diverse population.2007In: Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies, ISSN 1556-2948, E-ISSN 1556-2956, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 103-108Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Fallahi Khoshknab, M.
    et al.
    Nursing, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran .
    Mazaheri, Monir
    Karolinska Institute.
    Tamizi, Z.
    Clinical Research Center, Razi Educational Center, Tehran, Iran .
    Khankh, H. R.
    Nursing, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran .
    Babaei, R.m.
    Social Science, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran .
    Ghazanfari, N.
    Nursing, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran .
    Khoshknab, P. F
    Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran .
    The effect of weight monitoring and recording on control of obesity and overweight2011In: Eating and Weight Disorders, ISSN 1124-4909, E-ISSN 1590-1262, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 137-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is one of the dilemmas of the recent century and imposes huge costs related to its complications and diseases on people and societies. This study aims to investigate whether recording and monitoring weight and its changes can modify eating habits and therefore weight control.

    METHODS: This is a quasi-experimental interventional study. Seventy nine of the staff of the University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation (USWR) were randomly placed in two intervention (N=40) and control (39) groups. A standard weight scale and height meter was used to measure weight, height and body mass index (BMI). For the intervention group, weight was measured, recorded and announced to the participants twice a week for 3 months. For the control group, weight measurement and recording was done once in the beginning of the study and once at the end of the study. Data were analyzed using SPSS ver.11.5 and compared between groups.

    RESULTS: There were no significant differences in the average age between the groups. Mean pre-intervention weight was 87.08±10.9 Kg and 85.83±16.44 Kg in the intervention and control groups, respectively and was not significantly different. Mean post-intervention weight was 83.5 Kg in the intervention group, which was significantly different from pre-intervention weight. Mean post-intervention weight was 86.31 Kg in the control group that was not significantly different from pre-intervention weight.

    CONCLUSION: Recording and monitoring weight and its changes in overweight people can affect weight control since knowledge and insight about weight may motivate people to modify their eating habits. We therefore recommend this strategy as an adjuvant to weight control programs.

  • 12.
    Fallahi Khoshknab, Masoud
    et al.
    Department of Nursing, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Science, Tehran, Iran; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute.
    Maddah, Sadat Seyed Bagher
    Department of Nursing, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Rahgozar, Mehdi
    Department of Statistics, University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Validation and reliability test of Persian version of The Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale (SSCRS)2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 19-20, p. 2939-2941Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Manaporn Chatchumni, Manaporn
    et al.
    Mälardalen Univesity.
    Namvongprom, Ampaporn
    Rangsit University.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Nursing and Care.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Nursing and Care.
    Thai Nurses’ experiences of post-operative pain assessment and its’ influence on pain management decisions2016In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 15, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    While many studies have addressed various issues with regards to pain management, there is limited knowledge about how nurses assess pain in surgical wards. This study aimed to describe Thai nurses’ experiences of pain assessment in a surgical ward.

    Methods

    A cross-sectional explorative study was conducted. Participants were selected through theoretical sampling. Data was collected through interviews with twelve registered nurses working in surgical wards. Qualitative content analysis guided the analysis of the data.

    Results

    Nurses use a double/triple check system, communicated to the healthcare team via records and protocols, and they used their skills and experiences in pain assessment. The results showed that nurses missed the opportunity to include the patients’ self-reported pain in their accounts. Though much evidence of pain was collected, this did not seem to benefit the patients. Furthermore, the nurses were not using instruments to measure pain, which illustrates the potential unreliability of professionals who have differing opinions concerning the patients’ pain.

    Conclusions

    Thai nurses worked based on a ‘patient-evidence’ paradigm when assessing patients in pain; this should be shifted to an evidence-based paradigm. Furthermore, by including the patients’ self-reported pain in their assessment, nurses would both improve the quality of the pain assessment and empower patients in their pain management. Pain management practices in Thailand should be improved through education, training, supportive innovation, and collegial competence development in order to improve the quality of care in the post-operative field.

  • 14.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Pain management as ambition and practice can the gap be closed?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Post-earthquake health needs: Experiences of Iranian older people2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    Mälardalens högskola.
    The status of social and leisure time activities among elderly residing in Iran and Sweden2009In: Iranian Journal of Ageing, Vol. 3, no 8, p. 597-606Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Among social determinants of health, culture and ethnicity play a key role in defining the needs of different population groups. The aim of this study was to consider and compare the social and leisure time activities of the three .elderly groups: Iranian residing in Iran, Iranian residing in Sweden and Swedish residing in Sweden Methods and Materials: Via the cross-sectional design, 825 Iranian elderly who were living in Tehran compared with 305 Swedish elderly and 101 Iranian elderly living in Stockholm on social relations, group activities and leisure time activities. Only, elderly who could communicate properly entered the study. A structured questionnaire designed by the Iranian and Swedish Research Group on the” Assessment of Social Health Status and Needs” implemented for .the subjects. Estimation method and logistic regression used to analyze the gathered data Results: Subjects of all 3 groups were in the age range of 60-77 years old and mostly were married. Results showed despite very common characteristics, there are, also, many differences which can be explained by cultural and environmental factors. Rapid urbanization, limited resources and unawareness of or disregard for healthy life style resulted in lower levels of satisfaction with social and leisure life in the Iranian elderly. On the other hand, level of activities related to the spiritual dimension of health were more in Iranians than Swedish and the difference was significant (p=0.000), whereas the reverse was true for the group activities (p=0.000). Poor attitude toward physicalactivity and exercise in Iranian elderly, especially women, with consequent hazards for health, needs special consid.eration on behalf of the health planners and providers Conclusions: Needs assessment with trance- cultural approach, especially on social determinants of the health of elderly is a necessity. Using valid and reliable instruments, designed to overcome the cultural barriers would help.planners to apply the experience of the aged societies more reasonably, properly and creatively.

  • 17.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    To become old and develop dementia in a foreign country2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Ardalan, Ali
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences.
    Older people in disasters2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    et al.
    Mälardalen University; Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Ericson-Lidman, Eva
    Umeå University.
    Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali
    Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Ersta Sköndal University College; University of Gothenburg.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University; Ersta Sköndal University College.
    Clear conscience grounded in relations: Expressions of Persian-speaking nurses in Sweden2017In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 349-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Conscience is an important concept in ethics, having various meanings in different cultures. Because a growing number of healthcare professionals are of immigrant background, particularly within the care of older people, demanding multiple ethical positions, it is important to explore the meaning of conscience among care providers within different cultural contexts.

    RESEARCH OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to illuminate the meaning of conscience by enrolled nurses with an Iranian background working in residential care for Persian-speaking people with dementia.

    RESEARCH DESIGN: A phenomenological hermeneutical method guided the study.

    PARTICIPANTS AND RESEARCH CONTEXT: A total of 10 enrolled nurses with Iranian background, aged 33-46 years, participated in the study. All worked full time in residential care settings for Persian-speaking people with dementia in a large city, in Sweden.

    ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS: The study was approved by the Regional Ethical Review Board for ethical vetting of research involving humans. Participants were given verbal and written study information and assured that their participation was voluntary and confidential.

    FINDINGS: Three themes were constructed including perception of conscience, clear conscience grounded in relations and striving to keep a clear conscience. The conscience was perceived as an inner guide grounded in feelings, which is dynamic and subject to changes throughout life. Having a clear conscience meant being able to form a bond with others, to respect them and to get their confirmation that one does well. To have a clear conscience demanded listening to the voice of the conscience. The enrolled nurses strived to keep their conscience clear by being generous in helping others, accomplishing daily tasks well and behaving nicely in the hope of being treated the same way one day.

    CONCLUSION: Cultural frameworks and the context of practice needed to be considered in interpreting the meaning of conscience and clear conscience.

  • 20.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd, Hälsa och välfärd.
    Ericson-Lidman, Eva
    Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Norberg, Astrid
    Perception of conscience among enrolled nurses with an Iranian background working in residential care for Persian-speaking people with dementia disease2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Nursing and Care. Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Ericson-Lidman, Eva
    Umeå University.
    Öhlén, Joakim
    Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg; University of Gothenburg Centre for Person-Centred Care.
    Norberg, Astrid
    Umeå University; Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College.
    Meanings of troubled conscience and how to deal with it: expressions of Persian-speaking enrolled nurses in Sweden2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 380-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    A feature of the healthcare system in Sweden, particularly in the care of older people, is its cultural diversity in terms of having considerable numbers of both caregivers and care recipients with an immigrant background. Considering the influence of culture in ethical decision-making processes, the idea of conscience and the adverse effects of a troubled conscience, it is important to study the concepts of conscience and troubled conscience in culturally diverse populations. There is no published study regarding troubled conscience among immigrant populations that includes enrolled nurses.

    Aim

    To illuminate the meanings of troubled conscience and how to deal with it among enrolled nurses with Iranian backgrounds working in Swedish residential care for Persian-speaking people with dementia who have emigrated from Iran.

    Method

    The study was conducted with a phenomenological hermeneutic design. Ten enrolled nurses with an Iranian background, with at least one year's experience of taking care of older people with dementia, were interviewed. The study was reviewed by the Regional Ethical Review Board for ethical vetting of research involving humans. Appropriate measures were taken to ensure confidentiality and voluntary participation.

    Results

    The meanings of having a troubled conscience for the participants comprise not being a good person, including being an uncaring person, not acting according to one's values and living in a state of unease. Dealing with a troubled conscience involves trying to compensate for the harm one has caused and trying to prevent similar situations by being a responsible caregiver.

    Conclusions

    The enrolled nurses understood themselves as caring people and not only caregivers. They knew that they should hear their conscience and respond to it by trying to be a caring person and acting according to their values. The findings should be interpreted in the given specific context.

  • 22.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    et al.
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet; School of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Eriksson, Lars E
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet.
    Heikkilä, Kristiina
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet.
    Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet.
    Sunvisson, Helena
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University.
    Experiences of living with dementia: qualitative content analysis of semi-structured interviews2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 21/22, p. 3032-3041Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

    To describe people's experiences of living with dementia in Iran.

    BACKGROUND:

    A knowledge gap exists regarding the experiences of living with dementia in nonWestern contexts. This gap may be especially apparent within the Iranian context, where dementia research is relatively new. Deeper understanding about context-related experiences of dementia is a prerequisite for nurses' ability to provide adequate and meaningful care.

    DESIGN:

    Qualitative, cross-sectional design.

    METHODS:

    Qualitative content analysis of semi-structured interviews with people living with dementia in urban Iran (six women and nine men; 60-87 years old).

    RESULTS:

    The participants experienced their condition as a state of forgetfulness that was accompanied by losses and dependency on others. They wanted to feel good about themselves and feel important, but they continually struggled with matters such as a loss of accountability, feelings of futility and the frustration of others. Economic dependency and a lack of economic resources were sources of feelings of futility.

    CONCLUSION:

    Experiences of living with dementia in Iran included a substantial struggle to stay connected to the social world and to deal with dramatic life changes, aspects of living with dementia that seem to be universal. However, the feelings of financial burden and the experience of being nagged for their shortfalls by family members have seldom been described in other studies and seem to represent a cultural aspect of their experience.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    The results of the study call for further nursing efforts in supporting people living with dementia in their struggle with their altered lives and in retaining their connections to everyday life. Furthermore, their family members might benefit from specific nursing interventions including information about dementia and advice on how to help the family members with dementia to interact with others while exercising their individual strengths.

  • 23.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    et al.
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University; Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Karolinska Institutet; Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Eriksson, Lars E.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Karolinska Institutet; Department of Infectious Diseases, Karolinska University Hospital; School of Health Sciences, City University London, London, United Kingdom.
    Nasrabadi, Alireza Nikbakht
    Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Sunvisson, Helena
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University.
    Heikkilä, Kristiina
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Karolinska Institutet; Department of Health and Care Sciences, Faculty of Life and Health Sciences, Linnaeus University.
    Experiences of dementia in a foreign country: qualitative content analysis of interviews with people with dementia2014In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, article id 794Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Dementia is a worldwide health concern of epidemic proportions. Research in the field of subjective experience of dementia suffers from a lack of diversity of their participants including immigrants. Different portraits of life with dementia could help us understand how people with dementia conceptualise their experiences of dementia and how they live. Our study aimed to explore the subjective experiences of living with dementia among Iranian immigrants in Sweden.

    METHODS:

    Qualitative content analysis of interviews with fifteen people with dementia from Iranian immigrant backgrounds were conducted (8 females and 7 males).

    RESULTS:

    Three themes and seven associated sub-themes were revealed. The themes included: Being a person with dementia means living with forgetfulness (personal sphere), living with forgetfulness in the private sphere means feeling incompetent but still loved, living with forgetfulness in the public sphere means feeling confident and secure but also isolated.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Living with dementia for the participants meant living with forgetfulness. They experienced feeling incompetent but still loved within their families and feeling confident and secure but also isolated in the society. Educating people with dementia and their families about the course and process of dementia may help them understand the changes better and adjust their expectations. Our study can provide a basis for healthcare workers to understand the experiences of living with dementia from this specific perspective.

  • 24. Mazaheri, Monir
    et al.
    Fallahi Khoshknab, Masoud
    Sayyed Bagher, Sadat
    Rahgozar, Mahdi
    Nurses´ perception of Spirituality and Spiritual Care2009In: Health Monitor (Payesh), Vol. 8, no 1, p. 31-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective(s): To assess nurses' attitude toward spirituality and spiritual care in the care of psychiatric patients/clients.Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted to assess the attitude of nurses of Razi psychiatric center on spirituality and spiritual care and providing an educational plan. Samples consist of 107 nurses of Razi psychiatric center. Data were collected using the Spirituality and Spiritual Care Rating Scale (SSCRS). Data were analyzed with statistical software (SPSS) with using descriptive methods and statistical tests.Results: Results showed mean score of attitude on spirituality and spiritual care was 63.40 (SD±4.57). Majority of participants scored between 33-92 which was highest scores for the questionnaire. It shows that attitudes of nurses of Razi psychiatric center to spirituality and spiritual care were positively high. Conclusion: Nurses’ attitude for spirituality and spiritual care is positive and they believe that nurses must give spiritual care for their patients.

  • 25.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet; Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Sunvisson, Helena
    School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University.
    Nasrabadi Nikbakht, Alireza
    Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran.
    Sadat Maddah, Monir
    University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Iran.
    Emami, Azita
    College of Nursing, Seattle University, USA; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet.
    Bearing witness to life narratives: Iranian immigrant experiences of taking care of a family member with dementia2011In: Diversity in Health and Care, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 19-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Nazari, Shima
    et al.
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, Tehran, Iran.
    Mazaheri, K
    Postcath, Shahid Lavasani Hospital, Tehran, Iran .
    Taghavi Larijani, T.
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, Tehran, Iran.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, Tehran, Iran; Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet.
    Copying with the stressors: Iranian parents with epileptic children’s perspective2008In: Epilepsia, ISSN 0013-9580, E-ISSN 1528-1167, Vol. 49, no s7, p. 229-229Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Pietilä Rosendahl, Sirpa
    et al.
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Division of Caring Sciences.
    Söderman, Mirkka
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Division of Caring Sciences.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Division of Caring Sciences; Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran .
    Immigrants with dementia in Swedish residential care: an exploratory study of the experiences of their family members and Nursing staff2016In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 1, no 16, p. 1-12, article id 200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:Worldwide, there is a growing population of older people who develop dementia in a country other than that of their origin. When their dementia has reached an advanced stage, residential care is most often needed. People with dementia in Sweden are often cared for in group homes. For immigrants, this may mean a linguistically challenging care environment for both healthcare staff and the patients' family members. The aim of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of family members and professional caregivers regarding the care provided to immigrants with dementia in group homes in Sweden.

    METHODS:An exploratory, descriptive study with a qualitative approach was chosen. In-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with nine professional caregivers and five family members of people with dementia with Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian and Ingrian backgrounds; all were chosen purposefully. All people with dementia had lost their Swedish language skills as their second language. The data was analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS:Three main categories and seven subcategories were identified. The first main category: A new living situation comprised the subcategories: adjusting to new living arrangements and expectations regarding activities and traditional food at the group home, the second main category: Challenges in communication with the subcategories: limited communication between the immigrant with dementia and the Swedish-speaking nursing staff and the consequences of linguistic misunderstandings and nuanced communication in a common language and the third main category: The role of the family member at the group home with the subcategories: a link to the healthy life story of the family member with dementia and an expert and interpreter for the nursing staff.

    CONCLUSIONS:The family member played a crucial role in the lives of immigrants with dementia living in a group home by facilitating communication between the nursing staff and the PWD and also by making it possible for PWD to access the cultural activities they wanted and which professional caregivers were either not able to recognise as needed or could not deliver.

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