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  • 1.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    et al.
    Red Cross University College of Nursing.
    Christiansen, Mats
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences, and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    Red Cross University College of Nursing.
    Engström, Annica
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Gävle.
    Nursing under the skin: a netnographic study of metaphors and meanings in nursing tattoos2014In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 318-326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to present themes in nursing motifs as depicted in tattoos and to describe how it reflects upon nursing in popular culture as well as within professional nursing culture. An archival and cross-sectional observational study was conducted online to search for images of nursing tattoos that were freely available, by utilizing the netnographic methodology. The 400 images were analyzed in a process that consisted of four analytical steps focusing on metaphors and meanings in the tattoos. The findings present four themes: angels of mercy and domination; hegemonic nursing technology; embodying the corps; and nurses within the belly of the monster. The tattoos serve as a mirror of popular culture and the professional culture of nurses and nursing practice within the context of body art. Body art policy statements have been included in nursing personnel dress code policies. Usually these policies prohibit tattoos that are sexist, symbolize sex or could contribute and reproduce racial oppression. The results show that the tattoos can be interpreted according to several layers of meanings in relation to such policies. We therefore stress that this is an area highly relevant for further analyses in nursing research.

  • 2. Eriksson, Henrik
    et al.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Holmgren, Jessica
    Pringle, Keith
    His Helping hands: adult daughter's perceptions' of fathers with caregiving responsibility2013In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 235-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women's position as informal carers has been taken for granted in social policy and social professions, while relatively few discussions have elaborated on caring as a later life activity for men and the impact on family care. This study explores the processes connected to informal caregiving in later life through the position of adult daughters of older fathers engaged with long-term caregiving responsibilities for a partner. A sample of eight daughters, with fathers having primary caregiving responsibility for their ill partners was recruited and in-depth interviews were carried out and analysed according to qualitative procedures. The daughters' descriptions of their relationships with their fathers show that being an older man who engages in caring can have a positive outcome on relations. Even if some of the daughters have doubts about their fathers “masculine authenticity”, all of them appear to cherish “his helping hands” as a carer and closer more intimate relationships with their fathers. Caring for an old and frail spouse may potentially present alternative ways of being a man beyond traditional ‘male activities’ and that caring might also sometimes involve a re-construction of gender identities. It is suggested that social work professionals may use a gendered understanding to assess and work strategically with daughters and other family members who support caring fathers.

  • 3.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    A Visual Analysis on How the Physical Environment Conditions Relatives' Involvement in Nursing Homes2017In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study seeks to describe how the composition of the physical care environment conditions relatives' involvement in nursing home institutions. It is well known that the physical care environment in institutions has a significant impact on the well-being of residents and the work satisfaction of nursing staff. Less explored is how physical care environmental factors are related to the involvement of relatives in nursing homes. A visual analysis of 52 photographs from three nursing homes in Sweden shows how the physical environment acts to condition the involvement of relatives through the use of design, information displays, and cultural symbols. Although various aspects of the physical environment promoted participation of relatives, that engagement was based on certain limited concepts of involvement. This suggests that other conceptual frameworks of involvement in nursing homes are possible, and that these might encourage other aspects of involvement from the relatives of nursing home residents.

  • 4.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Nursing and Care.
    Anhörigas delaktighet vid äldreboenden: ett möjligheternas projekt?2017Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    Karolinska Institutet, Institutionen för neurobiologi, vårdvetenskap och samhälle.
    Conditions for relatives' involvement in nursing homes2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of this thesis was to describe and analyse how the involvement of relatives is conditioned in nursing homes from different critical perspectives. Gender perspectives, discourse analysis and intersectional theory are applied, based on social constructionist ontology. The thesis comprises three qualitative papers and data are based on ethnographically-focused fieldwork in three municipal nursing homes in the form of formal/informal interviews, participating observations and the analysis of documents.

    Based on gender perspectives, the routines and reasonings among nursing staff were studied and thematically analysed in relation to how these conditioned the involvement of relatives in the daily caring activities (I). In the second study (II), the nursing staff were interviewed in groups to describe, discursively analyse and identify the biopolitical meaning in the "involvement discourse" that was collectively constructed in the speech of the nursing staff concerning the involvement of relatives. In the last study (III), interviews with relatives were thematically analysed in the context of intersectional theory about their involvement in the nursing homes.

    The findings show that the conditions for relatives’ involvement were dynamic and constantly in re-negotiation, but also conservative and inflexible. This placed relatives in both privileged and unprivileged social positions in the nursing homes, which were relevant for their involvement. The relatives were considered to be "visitors", which conditioned the characteristics and levels of involvement in the care of the residents and was linked to gendered notions of the division of labor, both within the groups of relatives and between nursing staff and relatives (I). The involvement of relatives was conditioned by the biopolitics of an "involvement discourse" that prevailed in the nursing homes. This built upon family-oriented rhetorics and metaphors that upheld and legitimised notions about relatives. The relatives were considered to be members of the "old" family in relation to the "new" family represented by the nursing staff (II). The relatives described how they were positioned in a betweenship, squeezed between different competing social musts from the older family members, the nursing homes as institutions and the nursing staff (III).

    Inverting the prevailing picture of the involvement of relatives would make it possible to consider the nursing staff as pedagogical, professional and caring "visitors" in the nursing homes for the benefit of the residents and their relatives. This could be achieved through a constructive change management which emphasises the learning of nursing staff, their responsibility and the emotions of relatives, along with a focus on alternative notions of involvement, where relatives are included in the development of quality of care in Swedish nursing homes.

  • 6.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Nursing and Care.
    Global Nursing: Educating future nurses for tomorrow’s nursing care needs2017In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 172-174Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The world has witnessed the most comprehensive refugee diaspora of modern history. Sweden has been one of the countriesthat has welcomed people and given them refuge. Refugees are in need of quality nursing care that is provided by professionaland knowledgeable registered nurses. However, taking into account this global mobility and the resulting shift in demographiccharacteristics, nurses need to be particularly competent in relation to addressing global issues. The question is, are futurenurses educated with enough relevant knowledge and skills to be able to meet tomorrow’s nursing care needs? The SwedishRed Cross University College (SRCUC) has contributed to the global discourse in several aspects, not least those elementsrelated to the International Red Cross tradition and its basic humanitarian principles. We would like to share the stipulateddefinition that guides our subject profile area: global nursing. To answer the question that first concerned the SRCUC, wepreviously had conducted a traditional undergraduate nursing education that needed to be updated in relation to what is nowhappening globally. By developing and promoting the relevant knowledge and skills in global nursing, we believe that futurenurses will be prepared to accommodate tomorrow’s nursing care needs.

  • 7.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Nursing and Care.
    Humanitarian nursing in an EBOLA viral haemorrhagic fever outbreak: Before, during and after deployment2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In February 2014, the first Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) case in West Africa was confirmed in the Republic of Guinea. It then quickly spread to neighbouring countries, and became the largest Ebola outbreak ever. By March 2016, there was reported 28,639 cases of EVD and 11,316 deaths worldwide. As the largest humanitarian network in the world, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) played an active role in stopping the spread of the deadly virus. IFRC also provided psychosocial support to affected families, and assisted in the management of dead bodies. Previous research concerning the Ebola outbreak has focused on practical guidance, such as protective equipment, protective behaviours infection control and emergency management. Very few studies have focused on health care staff’s own experiences from caring for these patients under very extreme conditions. Nurses play a key role in global disaster response at disaster centers, nevertheless, they are often not prepared for the challenges they are facing and what nursing skills that are required by nurses who are first responders to a disaster situation.

    Objectives: To investigate how returnee nursing staff experienced their deployment before, during and after having worked at an Ebola Treatment Center (ETC) during an acute viral haemorrhagic fever (VHF) outbreak, and to supply knowledge on how to better prepare health care staff for future VHF outbreaks.

    Design: A cross-sectional approach.

    Participants: Nurses having returned after working with Ebola patients at an ETC in Kenema, Sierra Leone, during 2014 and 2015.

    Measurements: Data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire via mail covering aspects of pre-deployment training, personal health and stress management, leadership styles and knowledge transfer, socio-cultural exposure, and attitudes from others when returning home.

    Results: Before employment, there is a need for practical exercises specific for the task, and information adapted to the mission. Further, information to family and colleagues can be deepen. During employment, the participants are in need of interpersonal contacts, team work and strong dynamics. After deployment there is a need for mental health support and hands-on coping strategies.

    Conclusions: Participants stressed the importance of mental health support combined with psychosocial care after deployment. There is also a need for more specific practical training. An active dialogue and communication with colleagues were perceived as primordial, and information given to family and colleagues was relevant but not sufficient.

  • 8.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Postkoloniala blickar på konstruktionen av ”den Andre"2014In: Vårdvetenskap och postmodernitet: en introduktion / [ed] Henrik Eriksson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2014, 1, p. 113-144Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Nursing and Care.
    The voluntary arena - diversity, identity and glocal challenges within Swedish volunteering activities2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    et al.
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Emami, Azita
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Eriksson, Lars E.
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Red Cross University College of Nursing.
    Being perceived as a ‘visitor’ in the nursing staff’s working arena: the involvement of relatives in daily caring activities in nursing homes in an urban community in Sweden2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 677-685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    It is both complex and difficult for relatives when a loved one moves into a nursing home and many relatives are not prepared for the realities these new situations entail. Little attention has been paid to scrutinising the involvement of relatives in patient care, particularly in relation to the structures and routines of nursing homes or to the staff's reasoning concerning their involvement.

    Aim

    To describe, from a gender perspective, how nursing staff's routines and reasoning act to condition the involvement of relatives in nursing homes.

    Methods

    Focused ethnographic fieldwork was conducted in a medium-sized urban community in central Sweden in three different nursing homes.

    Results

    The nursing staff assigns a certain code of conduct to all relatives they perceived as ‘visitors’ in their working arena. This code of conduct was related to the routines and subcultures existing among the nursing staff and stemmed from a division of labour; the underlying concept of ‘visitor’ predetermined the potential for relatives' involvement. This involvement is explicitly related to the general gendered characteristics that exist in the nursing staff's perception of the relatives.

    Discussion

    The study's limitations are primarily concerned with shortcomings associated with a research presence during the fieldwork. The discussion focuses on the dimensions of power structures observed in the nursing home routines and the staff's reasoning based on their gendered assumptions. We argue that it is important to develop mechanisms that provide opportunities for nursing staff in elderly care to reflect on these structures without downplaying the excellent care they provide. We stress the importance of further exploring these issues concerning relatives and their involvement in nursing homes to facilitate the transition from informal caregiver to ‘visitor’.

  • 11.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    et al.
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge.
    Emami, Azita
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge.
    Eriksson, Lars E
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Red Cross University College of Nursing.
    Intersectional perspectives on family involvement in nursing home care: rethinking relatives' position as a betweenship2014In: Nursing Inquiry, ISSN 1320-7881, E-ISSN 1440-1800, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 227-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study seeks to understand, in the context of intersectional theory, the roles of family members in nursing home care. The unique social locus at which each person sits is the result of the intersection of gender, status, ethnicity and class; it is situational, shifting with the context of every encounter. A content analysis of 15 qualitative interviews with relatives of nursing home residents in Sweden was used to gain a perspective on the relationships between relatives and residents, relatives and the nursing home as an institution, and relatives and the nursing home staff. We sought to understand these relationships in terms of gendered notions of the family and the residents, which are handed down from generation to generation and thus condition who and how relatives should be involved in care, and the ways in which relationships change as care moves from home to nursing home. It requires knowledge and awareness that the nursing home culture is based on intersectional power structures in order for relatives to be involved in nursing home care in alternative and individual ways.

  • 12.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College. Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society Division of Nursing.
    Emami, Azita
    University of Washington, University of Washington, Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences, and Society.
    Eriksson, Lars E.
    Karolinska Institutet, Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College.
    Replicating the Family: The Biopolitics of Involvement Discourses Concerning Relatives in Nursing Home Institutions2014In: Aporia: The Nursing Journal, ISSN 1918-1345, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 19-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe the biopolitics of involvement discourses articulated by nursing staff concerning relatives in nursing home institutions, using a Foucault-inspired discourse analytical approach. Previous research has described how relatives have not been involved in nursing homes on their own terms. This is partly due to a lack of communication and knowledge, but it is also a consequence of an unclear organizational structure. Results from a discourse analysis of six focus group interviews with nursing staff show that the "involvement discourse" in nursing homes can be described as a "new" vs "old" family rhetoric. This rhetoric can be said to uphold, legitimize and provide different subject positions for both nursing staff and relatives concerning the conditions for involvement in nursing homes. As part of a "project of possibility" in elderly care, it may be possible to adopt a critical pedagogical approach among nursing staff in order to educate, strengthen and support them in reflecting on their professional norming and how it conditions the involvement of relatives.

  • 13.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    et al.
    Institutionen för neurobiologi, vårdvetenskap och samhälle, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Mälardalen University, School of Health, Care and Social Welfare.
    I princip men aldrig mer...: Sjuksköterskors resonemang kring omvårdnadsforskning och forskningsanvädning2009In: Vård i Norden, ISSN 0107-4083, E-ISSN 1890-4238, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 4-7Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Tegnestedt, Charlotta
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Global nursing as visualised on the internet: a netnographic analysis of the emerging global paradigm in nursing2018In: Contemporary Nurse: health care across the lifespan, ISSN 1037-6178, E-ISSN 1839-3535, Vol. 54, no 4-5, p. 443-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Positioned to face increasing issues relating to the growing and aging population, ill health, climate change, natural disasters, and humanitarian crises, nurses play a crucial role in responding to the challenges of globalisation. With nurses rising to meet these challenges, the term ‘global nursing’ has been coined. Given the ongoing proliferation of the term, it seems relevant to explore the key relationship of the concepts of ‘global’ and ‘nursing’ within the milieus provided through the internet.

    Aim: To describe how global nursing as a concept is visualised in images on the internet.

    Method: A cross-sectional observational design based on netnographic methodology was conducted. By searching the term ‘global nursing’ in the Google search engine, a total of 973 images illustrating ‘global nursing’ were collected and stored on one specific search occasion. The inclusion of data covered all regions but no other search limits.

    Results: The results show that global nursing, first and foremost, is visualised as an academic discourse, as a nursing activity, and as an approach to target sustainability. Further, the results also highlight that global nursing has manifested as a Western discourse, targeting students with access to resources and a humanitarian interest. Conclusion: By paying attention to global nursing as it is presented in this study, it has been possible to provide valuable insights about colonial boundaries in the nursing discourse relating to globality. Based on these results, we stress that the nursing paradigm would benefit from a greater postcolonial awareness and some reflexivity connected with the global issues that nurses are facing.

    Impact statement: Global nursing is paradoxically visualised as something distant, connected to ideas of ‘otherness’, and of not belonging to the Western nursing community

  • 15.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Kraft, Mia
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    A global nursing framework in the Swedish Red Cross undergraduate nursing program2018In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 167-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alongside a globalized world and a demographic shift in Sweden, future nurses must provide globally significant nursing care based on relevant knowledges and skills. To contribute to the global nursing discourse, this article aims to describe the process undertaken in developing and implementing a global nursing approach and curriculum in the Swedish Red Cross undergraduate nursing program. A comprehensive process of educational change was carried out, targeting both faculty and students with various academic activities. The new global-oriented curriculum was evaluated positively by nursing students, and a definition of global nursing was disseminated among educators. Nursing students at the Swedish Red Cross University College are now encouraged to advocate for vulnerable persons in need of healthcare services and to counteract inequalities and social injustice in sustainable ways. It is suggested that a global nursing framework is what is required when educating nurses to meet tomorrow’s nursing care needs.

  • 16.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Paillard-Borg, Stéphanie
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Saaristo, Panu
    The International Federation of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), Geneva, Switzerland.
    von Strauss, Eva
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Nurses’ experiences of health concerns, teamwork, leadership and knowledge transfer during an Ebola outbreak in West Africa2019In: Nursing Open, E-ISSN 2054-1058, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 824-833Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Tegnestedt, Charlotta
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Rodriguez, Marita
    Svenska Röda Korset.
    Frivillighetens arena: Frivilligas erfarenheter av mångfald, identitet och glokala utmaningar inom svensk frivilligverksamhet2019Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund I mitten på 2010-talet befann sig runt 65 miljoner människor på flykt runt om i världen på grund av krig, katastrofer och väpnade konflikter. Många människor flydde för sina liv och sökte skydd och fristad i Europa och Sverige. På lokal nivå anlitades ofta rödakorskretsar i det humanitära bemötandet och omhändertagandet av dessa människor. Delvis var detta en ny situation och erfarenhet för frivilligarbetare. Syfte Syftet med forskningsprojektet var att undersöka hur frivilliga beskriver och resonerar kring lokala och globala utmaningar relaterade till demografiska förändringar, med fokus på personer som är på flykt och är i behov av humanitära frivilliginsatser. Metod Data har samlats in via fokusgruppsintervjuer i tre olika kretsar i Mellansverige. Intervjuerna genomfördes på tre olika nivåer i varje krets, med frivilliga, frivilligledare och kretsstyrelse. Resultat De transkriberade intervjuerna analyserades tematiskt och följande teman identifierades; Erfarenheter från flyktingströmmen 2015, Kärnan i frivilligt arbete inom Svenska Röda Korset, Förvalta och bevara, men också tänka nytt, Tredje sektorns betydelse och frivillighet under ansvar, Tankar framåt och fortsatt arbete i rödakorskretsarna. Slutsatser och framåtblickar Några paradoxer och framtida utmaningar identifierades. Utmaningarna tycks ligga i att kunna överbrygga och tänka ”både och” i stället för ”antingen eller” vad gäller frivilligas traditionella villkor i relation till vad som kan utvecklas, i en tid där frivilligverksamhet kommer att få en alltmer betydande roll i det svenska samhället.

  • 18.
    Paillard-Borg, Stéphanie
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Public Health and Medicine.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Nursing and Care.
    Immigration, Women, and Japan—A Leap Ahead and a Step Behind: A Qualitative Journalistic Approach2016In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 1-7, article id 2158244016673129Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Japan has become a super-aged society, facing demographic challenges resulting in societal and economic consequences. In its political structural reform, the Japanese government presented the urgency to consider the increase in labor mobility that includes the issues of immigration and female employment, both domestic and foreign. The aim of this study was to explore, from a Japanese woman’s perspective, the intertwined issues of immigration. An in-depth interview was performed and analyzed by content analysis with a methodological departure in qualitative journalistic interviewing. The case was a Japanese woman with a unique profile. The results of this study, family permanency and group cohesiveness, can contribute to understand the potential interdependency between the roles, within the Japanese society, of foreign female domestic workers and Japanese women. In conclusion, it appears that the pivotal role of women in the Japanese society and the global feminization of migration challenge Japanese social consistency.

  • 19.
    Paillard-Borg, Stéphanie
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Saaristo, P.
    International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, Geneva, Switzerland.
    von Strauss, Eva
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Heroes and pariahs: Nurses in a viral haemorrhagic fever outbreak2017In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 27, no S3, p. 319-319Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    et al.
    Department of Health Care Sciences, Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Eskilstuna.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    Research and Development Unit, Centre for Clinical Research, Sörmland County Council, Eskilstuna.
    Pringle, Keith
    Department of Applied Social Sciences, London Metropolitan University, London, UK.
    Keeping the family balance: adult daughters perspectives on roles and strategies when supporting caring fathers2009In: European Journal of Social Work, ISSN 1369-1457, E-ISSN 1468-2664, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 233-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Scandinavian countries represent a progressive approach to gender equality and transitions of traditional gender roles but little attention has been paid to gender equality in old age and how normative constructions of gender intersect in the lives of family carers. The aim of this study was to understand how adult daughters experience their roles and strategies when supporting fathers caring for an ill mother. A sample of eight daughters shared their experiences through in-depth interviews. The findings show that the daughters provide substantial and crucial effort and are intimately involved in the caring for their father and the sole contributors towards the emotional support of their fathers. They tend to devote a lot of energy towards picturing their family as 'normal' in terms of the family members adopting traditional roles and activities inside as well as outside the family context. In conclusion, the lack of understanding about gender as a 'norm producer' is something that needs to be further elaborated upon in order for professionals to encounter norm-breaking behaviours. The daughters' position as family carers is often assumed and taken for granted since the intersecting structures that impact on the situations of the daughters are largely invisible.

  • 21.
    von Strauss, Eva
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Paillard-Borg, Stéphanie
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Saaristo, Panu
    International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), Geneva, Switzerland.
    Global nursing in an Ebola viral haemorrhagic fever outbreak: before, during and after deployment2017In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 1371427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nurses are on the forefront and play a key role in global disaster responses. Nevertheless, they are often not prepared for the challenges they are facing and research is scarce regarding the nursing skills required for first responders during a disaster situation.Objectives: To investigate how returnee nursing staff experienced deployment before, during and after having worked for the Red Cross at an Ebola Treatment Center in Kenema, West Africa, and to supply knowledge on how to better prepare and support staff for viral haemorrhagic fever outbreaks.Methods: A descriptive, cross-sectional approach. Questionnaires were administered to nurses having worked with patients suffering from Ebola in 2014 and 2015. Data collection covered aspects of pre-, during and post-deployment on clinical training, personal health, stress management, leadership styles, socio-cultural exposure and knowledge transfer, as well as attitudes from others. Data was analysed using both quantitative and qualitative methods.Results: Response-rate was 88%: forty-four nurses from 15 different countries outside West Africa answered the questionnaire. The respondents identified the following needs for improvement: increased mental health and psychosocial support and hands-on coping strategies with focus on pre- and post-deployment; more pre-deployment task-oriented clinical training; and workload reduction, as exhaustion is a risk for safety.Conclusions: This study supplies knowledge on how to better prepare health care staff for future viral haemorrhagic fever outbreaks and other disasters. Participants were satisfied with their pre-deployment physical health preparation, whereas they stressed the importance of mental health support combined with psychosocial support after deployment. Furthermore, additional pre-clinical training was requested.

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