Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 62
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Barkestad, Eva
    et al.
    Andersson, Ingrid
    Gustafsson, Ingrid
    Hyllienmark, Petra
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Stevens, Lena
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Säkra kunskap och kvalitet: utmaningar för framtidens anestesi och intensivvårdssjuksköterska2017In: Ventilen, ISSN 0348-6257, no 4, p. 16-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Crafoord, Marie-Therese
    et al.
    Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Fagerdahl, Ann-Mari
    Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet.
    Operating Room Nurses’ Perceptions of the Clinical Learning Environment: A Survey Study2018In: Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing: Continuing Competence for the Future, ISSN 0022-0124, E-ISSN 1938-2472, Vol. 49, no 9, p. 416-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Authors commonly agree that the clinical learning environment significantly affects student learning. Studies of how operating room nurses perceive the clinical learning environment during their specialist studies are sparse. 

    Method: This study aimed to examine newly graduated operating room nurses’ perceptions of the clinical learning environment during their specialist education. Fifty newly graduated operating room nurses answered a questionnaire gaging their perceptions of clinical education. 

    Results: Most participants perceived the clinical learning environment as good and highly associated with the supervisor’s ability to supervise, enjoy supervision, and show interest in the participants’ degree project. The management at the clinical setting, which was perceived to emphasize the importance of supervision, time allocated especially for supervision, and perceived cooperation between the University and hospital, also had an impact. 

    Conclusion: Social interactions and structures within the operating room affect how the clinical learning environment is perceived. 

  • 3.
    Forsner, Maria
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Caring for Dying Children in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Nurses and Parent’s Perspective2019In: Online Journal of Complimentary & Alternative Medicine, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 1-7, article id 000510Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Caring for dying children is complex and requires coordination of all resources. In PICU the main objective is to save lives and ensure vital functions in critically ill children. However due to the child’s critical and life-threatening condition, there is always the possibility the child will not survive. The acuity and technical nature of the intensive care context can provide an obstacle in the transition to palliative care and furthermore conflict with the affected families’ needs. The study aim was to enlightening caring as it is represented in caring situations of dying children at PICU. An Interpretative Phenomenological design was applied. The data collection was performed at three PICU in Sweden in two different occasions at 2011 and 2016 [1,2]. Caring situations of a total of 18 children were observed, of these five cases were estimated as end of life care or lifethreatening conditions. Additionally, nurses and parents were interviewed in direct connection to the observation. Results showed that for nurses, it was a challenge to change perspective from curative to palliative care. Furthermore, medical examinations and treatment was experienced to disturb the dying child thus causing unnecessary suffering. Parents found it difficult to leave their dying children even just for a moment. At the same time the space in PICU usually did not support closeness and parenting but rather separated the dying child from her/his family. In conclusion, since it isn´t possible to always care for dying children in specialized palliative care units these results illuminate the importance of guidelines and training in palliative care in PICU and other acute pediatric care units. Children and their family ought to have the best care possibly when affected by life-limiting or life-threatening illness.

  • 4.
    Kangas-Niemi, Annina
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Manninen, Katri
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Facilitating affective elements in learning - In a palliative care context2018In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 33, p. 148-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore ways clinical supervisors facilitate the learning of the affective elements of professional competence in a clinical palliative care environment. The secondary aim was to advocate for and raise awareness of the importance of the affective domain in medical education.

    A clinical palliative care learning environment has been reported to be emotionally challenging. The affective and transformative learning processes taking place requires special support. However, little is known about how clinical supervisors facilitate this learning processes. A qualitative, explorative study was designed to capture supervisors' perceptions of their supervision using semi-structured interviews. Six experienced clinical supervisors working within a palliative care context were recruited using convenience sampling. Data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. The affective elements were viewed as essential for learning, clinical supervision, and professional competency. Supervisors use a variety of different ways of facilitation. Four main themes were identified; building a relationship, creating space for learning, creating a pedagogical environment, and Mirroring.

  • 5.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College.
    A masters’ programme in medical education as strategy to enhance researched based education2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College.
    A qualitative national study of nurses clinical knowledge-development of pain in the pediatric intensive care unit2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College.
    Caring For Children In Picu, An Observation Study Focusing On Nurses’ Concerns2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare. The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Caring for dying children in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit2017Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 9.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare.
    Caring for dying children in the pediatric intensive care unit [PICU]2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Caring for dying children is complex and requires coordination of all resources.In PICU the main objective is to save lives and ensure vital functions in critically ill children. However due to the child’s critical and life threatening condition, there is always the possibility the child will not survive. The acuity and technical nature of the intensive care context can provide an obstacle in the transition to palliative care and furthermore conflict with the affected families’ needs.

    Objectives

    The study aim was to enlightening caring as it is represented in caring situations of dying children at PICU.

    Methods

    An Interpretative Phenomenological design was applied. The data collection was performed at three PICU in Sweden at 2011 and 2016. Caring situations of a total of 18 children were observed, six cases were estimated as end of life care or life threatening conditions. Nurses and parents were interviewed in direct connection to the observation.

    Conclusions/Results

    Preliminary findings showed that for nurses, it was a challenge to change perspective from curative to palliative care. Medical examinations and treatment was experienced to disturb the dying child thus causing unnecessary suffering. Parents found it difficult to leave their dying children even just for a moment and the space in PICU did not support closeness and parenting but rather separated the dying child from her/his family.In conclusion, these findings illuminates the importance of guidelines and training in palliative care in PICU. Children and their family ought to have the best care possibly when affected by life-limiting or life-threatening illness.

  • 10.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare.
    Caring in the PICU2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Children's participation in the PICU from the nurses’ perspective, an observational study2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Children's Participation in the PICU from the Nurses’ Perspective, an Observational Study2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare.
    Development of a Critical-Care Nurse Examination2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The preparation to become a critical-care nurse in Sweden consists of a college program. The programs need to meet a set of widely defined goals developed by the Board of Higher Education, but can differ in content and lay-out depending on the college curriculum. There is subsequently no pre-defined standards for the knowledge, competencies and capabilities a critical-care nurse should possess. This presents a problem for both employers, educators, nurses and students and can ultimately compromise patient safety.AIM: Our aim was to develop a final examination that would reflect theoretical knowledge, as well as practical skills and competencies for an entry-level critical care nurse.

    METHOD: The content of the final examination was based on a previously developed assessment tool used for clinical rotations at our college. This assessment tool reflected the competencies stated by the national association of critical care nurses in Sweden (AnIva) as well as the goals required by the Board of Higher Education in Sweden. After development of the exam, which comprises a two-step assessment where the students´ skills and capabilities are assessed, and a theoretical part where the students´ nursing-care knowledge is assessed by explicit pre-determined standards, the exam was tested and then revised in several steps after several focus-group discussions with content-experts and students.

    RESULT: The content-experts reported they were helped by having a set of explicit pre-determined standards to guide them. The students expressed similar sentiments as well as satisfaction from receiving “proof” of having reached an entry-level critical-care nurse level.IMPACT FOR PRACTICE: A set benchmark where knowledge-level and competency requirements are clarified for critical care nursing-practice aids students, educators and employers in setting goals for, and evaluating individuals working towards becoming a critical care nurse. This ultimately strengthens the profession and promotes patient safety.

  • 14.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Digitalization in a technological environment, a pediatric operating theater2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Do we Dare to Let the Family be there all the Time?2019In: EC Paediatrics, Vol. 02, p. 05-06, article id ECPE-19-ECO-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Relatives to patients that has been undergoing resuscitation attempts, where no family members have been allowed to stay in the room, describe their greatest fear as being separated from the patient if he or she did not survive [1]. From the child’s perspective when hospitalized in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), collaboration between healthcare professionals, parents and the child, if possible, is a prerequisite for god nursing care. The child is also entitled to have a parent or other relative with them 24 hours a day [2]. From the parent’s perspective many situations in the PICU feels chaotic and unreal, the worst situations are when they are not given the opportunity to be close to their child and being involved in the care [3,4]. Observing the healthcare staff working intensively is perceived as very stressful and the parents are filled with much fear [4]. 

  • 16.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Facilitating affective elements in a palliative care context2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Facilitating affective elements in learning, a palliative context: medical education2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College.
    Facilitation of learning in specialist nursing training in the PICU: the facilitators’ concerns in the learning situation2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Feel me, hear me, children’s participation in the PICU2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children who are critically ill are vulnerable and the nurse has a responsibility to meet the child`s needs in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Objectives: The aim was to explore the vulnerable child's participation and how it can be understood through the nurses’ perspective in the situated nursing care intervention. By exploring ways clinical supervisors facilitate the learning of the participation from critically ill children in a clinical environment  Method: The study design was an exploratory inductive qualitative approach.  Data collection was done through observations and interviews. The data from the observations were analyzed through interpretive phenomenology. Findings: The affective elements were viewed as essential for learning to understand how children participate in the PICU and to develop professional competency. Three themes emerged through the analysis: Mediated participation, Bodily participation and Participation by proxy. They all highlight different aspect of the vulnerable child's way of participating in the nursing care given, through nurses awareness and situated salience. Conclusion: The concept participation should be redefined and broadened; as participation can present itself through the child’s body in diverse ways. considerations: Confidentiality procedures were followed, ethical permission was given from the ethical komitee at KI, and all informants participated on an informed, independent and voluntary basis. The informants that chose to participate were informed that they could cease participation at any time.

     Audience take away: 1.    The concept participation should be redefined and broadened; it should be understood and interpreted in a new way within the PICU.2.     Participation can present itself through the child’s body in diverse ways, and every person working with children needs to act accordingly. Children has a right to be involved in their care and treated as the first person the PICU nurses first responsibility lies with the child, to address their needs and their rights.   3.    We call for an awareness and a strategy on how participation can be established and strengthened in various ages at the PICU. Through the awareness of the Childs body and the technical devices the Childs needs can be interpreted and meet

    • The audience will get examples of how nurses can “listen” with their nursingcare interventions and meet the subtle signs of the childs will.  
    • It will give them evidence to be in harmony with the convention of childrens right as well as strengthen the child as a person.Practical tips on how to expand the well being of the whole family in the PICU. It also relates to the caring culture which can be studied. 

     

  • 20.
    Mattsson, Janet
    Sachsska barn- och ungdomssjukhuset, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm.
    Holistik omvårdnad och evidensbaserade metoder ger individualiserad vård och bättre kvalitet2013In: Barnbladet, ISSN 0349-1994, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 34-37Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College.
    Hur sjuksköterskor lär och uppfattar smärta2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare.
    Improving Academic Writing in Nursing Education2016In: International Journal of Higher Education, ISSN 1927-6044, E-ISSN 1927-6052, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 96-102Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    It is Time we Become Child Centered at all Children’s Hospitals2019In: Acta Scientific Paediatrics, ISSN 2581-883X, Vol. 2, no 9, p. 01-02Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) family- and childcentered care does not have the same prepared tools to relay on as, for example, neonatal care. In neonatal care the parents are quickly involved in the child's care. The caring philosophy NIDCAP (Newborn individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program) and SFS-Situation adapted family co-operation, are both adapted for the child and for the parents. Both these "utensils" are based on individualizing the nursing care from a family-centered perspective. However, the same prepared tools or tools are not available from a child-centered care perspective, which gives the child a disadvantage and every act of involvement rests upon the nurse’s knowledge and ability to vindicate such child centered care in the caring situation [1]. According to the United Nations Convention on Children's Rights [2], the child´s best interest needs to be put firsthand when health and medical care is given to children. The idea is that the child should be in the center. The focus is thus moved from a family-centered perspective, to a child-centered perspective.

  • 24.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Klinisk examination2017In: AnIva kongress 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College.
    Kunskapsutveckling om smärta inom barnintensivvården2011Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 26.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Learning Strategies is a Prerequisite for High Quality Nursing Care in the PICU2018In: Acta Scientific Paediatrics, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 1-2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sometimes children get so sick that they rapidly become omitted to the most advanced level of pediatric care, the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). This is a strange place where noise and scent as well as the touch feels different [1] to all other experiences the child might have had prior to the omittance. Research have shown that the parents perspective for the future is only a few hours [2] when their child are at the PICU. They all, in their own ways, balance between life and death. There is a real threat that the care in a PICU might end in the death of the child. In this context the PICU nurse works, learns and balances here nursing care interventions to support the child, the parents as well as being a team member with exceptional skills [3]. 

  • 27.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College.
    Nurses Clinical Learning: Parent’s Perspective on Nursing Care2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College.
    Nutritionsscreening av barn,  Sachsska Barnsjukhuset2011Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Bellerarn som läggs in på sjukhus har i många fall akuta akutiserade kroniska sjukdomar. Infektioner och inflammationer minskar önskan att äta, vilket försämrar möjligheten att inta, digerera och absorbera tillräckligt med föda.

    Ökade förluster i samband med kräkningar och/eller diarré kan bidra till försämrat näringsläge. Med ett par enkla frågor och vikt/längd mätning kan man gruppera barn som läggs in på avdelningarna beträffande risknivå för malnutrition. Med denna riskbedömning kan man sedan gå vidare för att förebygga eller behandla malnutrition hos dessa barn, på sjukhus eller i öppenvården.

    Studier har visat att 8-26% av barn vårdade på sjukhus har låg vikt i förhållande till ålder eller längd. Malnutrition påverkar muskelmassa, försämrar hjärt-lungfunktionen, ger sämre sårläkning, sämre immunförsvar, ökar risken för sekundära infektioner och påverkar det psykiska välbefinnandet negativt.

    Sjuksköterskor på Sachsska Barnsjukhuset har en nyckelroll i upptäckten av dessa missförhållanden. Till sin hjälp har de STAMP (Screening tool for the Assessment of Malnutrition in Paediatrics) vilket är ett enkelt verktyg för att poängsätta risk för malnutrition hos sjuka barn. Genom att kontrollera nutritionsstatus på alla barn som läggs in på Sachsska barnsjukhuset upptäcks och korrigeras malnutrition av olika genes i ett tidigt skede. Målet är att  nutritionsscreena alla barn som läggs in på Sachsska Barnsjukhuset. 

    Som analysunderlag användes STAMP, en validerad näringsscreeningmetod för barn i åldern 2-16 år. STAMP är ett enkelt 5-stegs verktyg som utvecklats av ett team från Royal Manchester barnsjukhus och University of Ulster.

    En pilotstudie på 20 barn genomfördes under januari/februari 2011. Resultatet visade att barn med risk för malnutrition fångades upp och övervakades under vårdtiden för att sedan skrivas ut med god nutritionsstatus.

    Genom att screena barnen för malnutrition kan vi tidigt skilja ut de barn som riskerar malnutrition av något slag och ge dem individuellt anpassad omvårdnad. Detta minskar risken för bestående malnutrition,                                                        ökar deras välbefinnande samt kvaliteten i omvårdnaden av nutritionen under sjukhusvistelsen. 

  • 29.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Participation from the nurse’s perspective in the PICU2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children who are critically ill are vulnerable and the nurse has a responsibility to meet the child`s needs in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU).

    Objectives: The aim was to explore the vulnerable child's participation and how it can be understood through the nurses’ perspective in the situated nursing care intervention. By exploring ways clinical supervisors facilitate the learning of the participation from critically ill children in a clinical environment  

    Method: The study design was an exploratory inductive qualitative approach.  Data collection was done through observations and interviews. The data from the observations were analyzed through interpretive phenomenology. 

    Findings: The affective elements were viewed as essential for learning to understand how children participate in the PICU and to develop professional competency. Three themes emerged through the analysis: Mediated participation, Bodily participation and Participation by proxy. They all highlight different aspect of the vulnerable child's way of participating in the nursing care given, through nurses awareness and situated salience.

    Conclusion: The concept participation should be redefined and broadened; as participation can present itself through the child’s body in diverse ways.

    Considerations: Confidentiality procedures were followed, ethical permission was given from the ethical komitee at KI, and all informants participated on an informed, independent and voluntary basis. The informants that chose to participate were informed that they could cease participation at any time.

  • 30.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College.
    Sjuksköterskors kliniska lärande om smärta2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Sound of potency. An observation study of nurses' approach to sound in a pediatric intensive care unit2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare.
    Structured assessment of students in a critical care nursing programme2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Team Training, A Prerequisite of Being Safe in a Technological Environment, A Pediatric Operating Theater2018In: Acta Scientific Paediatrics, ISSN 2581-883X, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 18-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We all know that the digitalization is here to stay, so also in the children’s operating theater. We also know that effective teamwork is crucial for safe surgery. Changes in demographic trends and new surgical and technological innovations require close collaboration with other disciplines for a number of reasons [1]. Despite the advances in technology, making healthcare safer depends, not on minimizing the human contribution but on understanding how people, look ahead, overcome hazards and, in effect, create safety [2]. This is very true in a high technological environment that has become utterly specialized and digitalized during the last decade. As the technical devices becomes more and more complex we require another approach for interprofessional collaboration in the operating theater to keep the child safe during the operation. Especially a breakdown in communication, poor teamwork, lack of leadership and poor decision making by individuals and teams have all been shown to be major contributors to adverse events [3].

  • 34.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    The child`s needs in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU)2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare.
    The non-verbal communication in handover situations are the spice between the lines, to understand the severity of the patient’s condition2017In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 7, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate emergency nurses’ experiences of verbal handover from emergency medicalservices and through these experiences uncover patient safety issues in the handover situation.Methods: Design: The design is qualitative inductive and aims to deepen the understanding of the handover situation and touncover the nurses’ experiences in such a situation. Methods: A qualitative research process which takes its departure in patientsafety theory. Nine informants were interviewed and a content analysis was applied.Results: The results show that a lack of structure, lack of seeing the non-verbal communication, the nurses’ own requirement forfull control and the lack of active listening involves patient safety risks. Emergency nurses want a handover that is personal andprovides a comprehensive picture of the patient to support, deepen or contradict the verbal handover given.Practical implications: The non-verbal communication in the handover situation is key to understand the severity of the situationand give the nurses profane knowledge how to prepare the continuing nursing care. To further support the understanding of thesituation, information should be presented in chronological order.KeyWords: Communication, Handover, Patient safety

  • 36.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare.
    The sound of potency: an observational study2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to investigate the nurse ́approach to sound in an hightechnological pediatric intensive care unit. The method used derived from a theorethical perspective based on Patricia benner interpretative phenomenology.How the caregivers aknowledge the sounds in the Environment is based on their knowledge of how it affects the severly ill Children but also on the caring Culture. The result showed Three qualitative variations of approaches to sound in closeness to the critically ill Child. They are presented as follows: The room as a situation, the room as a workplace and the room as a place to rest. A central phenomenon uncovered in the observations were how the caring culture normalized the sound level to theextent that it was neglected, unless called upon as a direct reaction in combination with other signs of critical incidents. Sound was accepted at high levels close to the child's ears. Noise levels increased when a new child arrived in the room or when the round came in. A fundamental difference was uncovered when the children's room was approached as a room for recovery. Then nurses actively kept a low sound level andarranged interventions accordingly. No connections between childrens' gender, age or medical status could be found.

  • 37.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    They have their whole life left2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Twelve tipps on interview as datacollecting technique - a workshop2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Mattsson, Janet
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Uncovering pain and caring for children in the pediatric intensive care unit: nurses’ clinical approach and parent’s perspective2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The thesis has a standpoint in a synthesis of caring science and educationscience from a clinical perspective. Children in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) are in an exposed position, dependent on nurses to acknowledge their needs. The alleviation of children’s pain has been investigated from various perspectives, but undertreated pain remains a problem in the PICU. There is a preponderance of empirical evidence pointing toward the role of nurses in uncovering children’s pain and suffering. How nurses interpret the child’s expressions and judge the clinical situation influences their actions in the clinical care. In a PICU, the basis for nurses’ concerns and interpretation of what is meaningful in the nursing care situation are formed by professional concern, workplace culture, traditions, habits, and workplace structures. This influences how parents interpret the meaning of care as well. Patricia Benner’s theory on clinical judgment forms a reference framework for this thesis. The assumption is that children need to be approached from a holistic perspective in the caring situation in order to acknowledge their caring needs. A nurse’s clinical education and insights allow for the possibility to enhance the quality of care for children and parents in the PICU.

    Aim: To uncover clinical concerns, from caring and learning perspectives, in caring for children in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) from nurses and parents perspective.

    Methods: Qualitative methods were used in all studies to unfold and explore the phenomena in the nurses’ and parents’ everyday clinical life world. In Papers I and II, a phenomenographic method was adopted. In Papers III and IV, an interpretive phenomenological approach was adopted.

    Findings: Nurses that have a holistic view of the child and approach the child from a multidimensional perspective, with a focus on the individual child and his/her caring needs, develop a clinical “connoisseurship” and meet the parents’ expectations of the meaning of care. The nurses express that it is only when they focus on the child that subtle signs of pain are revealed. The meaning of nursing care, in the ideal case, is a holistic care where all aspects are integrated and the child as a person has first priority.

    Conclusion: The meaning of caring and children’s needs must become elucidated to improve the cultural influence of what can be seen as good nursing care within the PICU.

  • 40.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare. The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Vårdande och omvårdnad av kritiskt sjuka barn2017Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 41.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare. The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    What's That Sound? An Observation Study Of Nurses' Approach To Sound In A Pediatric Intensive Care Unit2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The noise levels in adult intensive care is a well-researched phenomenon which constantly exceeds international and national recommendations.In the pediatric intensive care, the caregivers of the children work in a high tech environment as they are surrounded by sound from several sources of various kinds.How they understand and acknowledges these sounds negative effect on the child’s well-being depend on their individual knowledge and awareness of how sound can affect children negatively. However, for a critically ill child who comes to the intensive care unit, this is in most cases a new experience which in itself means greater stress.Both the environment itself and the noise levels.

    Objectives

    This study intends to investigate the nurses' approach to three sources of sound that contribute to high noise levels;alarms, doors that open and conversation.The theoretical perspective in the study is based on studies on caring culture.

    Methods

    Non Participation semi-structured qualitative observations were conducted in a pediatric intensive care unit of one of Sweden's metropolitan regions in the winter of 2014-2015.

    Conclusions/Results

    The results show that high noise levels are an overlooked phenomenon in the pediatric intensive care environment as it has given way to other priorities in the nurse's work.It is also clear that this depends on the department's caring culture as it prioritizes other things which results in normalizing high levels of noise as a part of the pediatric intensive care environment.

  • 42.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    Södersjukhuset / Karolinska Institutet.
    Forsner, M.
    Södersjukhuset / Karolinska Institutet.
    Castren, M.
    Södersjukhuset / Karolinska Institutet.
    Arman, M.
    Södersjukhuset / Karolinska Institutet.
    Clinical judgement of pain in the non-verbal child at the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to explore PICU nurses’ experiences of clinical judgment of pain in critically ill non-verbal children. The alleviation of children’s pain has been investigated from various perspectives but undertreated pain remains a problem in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit with empirical evidence pointing towards the role of nurses and their pain judgment process.

    Summary of work: A phenomenographic method containing interviews was of seventeen experienced PICU nurses. Three categories emerged, describing nurses’ experiences of clinical judgment of pain from diverse perspective and levels of understanding.

    Summary of results: The findings are hierarchically ordered A, B, C, with A as the most elaborate level of understanding. (A), named Knowledge orientation, takes various aspects of pain in consideration and relates it to theoretical as well as experiential knowledge. (B), called Investigating orientation is focused on the specific child and this child’s specific pain cues, requiring the parent’s engagement. In (C) Practical orientation the judgment process is unsystematic, building on experiential knowledge.

    Conclusions: This study puts forward that the clinical judgment process has direct implications for how nurses take contextual factors, the child’s condition and the parents’ perceptions into consideration when judging the severity and intensity of the child’s pain, and by extension the child’s pain alleviation.

    Take-home messages: Increased awareness on nurses’ judgment processes benefits nursing care and nurses becomes more aware of how their judgment process directly affects the alleviation of pain. Finding ways of applying theoretical and experiential knowledge ineveryday care is proposed to systematically facilitate this

  • 43.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Forsner, M. F.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Castrén, M. C.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Bolander Laksov, K. B.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Arman, M. A.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    A qualitative national study of nurses’ clinical knowledge development of pain in Pediatric Intensive Care2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College. Institutet, Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset.
    Forsner, Maria
    Academy Health and Society, Health Science, Nursing care. Högskolan Dalarna.
    Bolander Laksov, Klara
    Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Medical Education, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics.
    Facilitation of learning in specialist nursing training in the PICU: The supervisors’ concerns in the learning situation2014In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 4, no 12, p. 34-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the aim to unfold nurses’ concerns of the supervision of the student in the clinical caring situation of the vulnerable child, clinical nurses situated supervision of postgraduate nursing students in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) are explored. A qualitative approach, interpretive phenomenology, with participant observations and narrative interviews, was used. Two qualitative variations of patterns of meaning for the nurses’ clinical facilitation were disclosed in this study. Learning by doing theme supports the students learning by doing through performing skills and embracing routines. The reflecting theme supports thinking and awareness of the situation. As the supervisor often serves as a role model for the student this might have an immediate impact on how the student applies nursing care in the beginning of his or her career. If the clinical supervisor narrows the perspective and hinders room for learning the student will bring less knowledge from the clinical education than expected, which might result in reduced nursing quality.

  • 45.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset; Karolinska Institutet.
    Forsner, Maria
    Högskolan Dalarna, Omvårdnad.
    Castrén, Maaret
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset; Karolinska Institutet.
    Arman, Maria
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Karolinska Institutet.
    Clinical Judgment of Pain in the Non-Verbal Child at the PICU: A Phenomenographic Study2011In: Journal of Palliative Care & Medicine, ISSN 2165-7386, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 102-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science and Education; Södersjukhuset.
    Forsner, Maria
    Högskolan Dalarna, Omvårdnad.
    Castrén, Maaret
    Karolinska Institutet. Department of Clinical Science and Education; Södersjukhuset and Section of Emergency Medicine.
    Bolander Laksov, Klara
    Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Medical Education, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics.
    Arman, Maria
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society.
    A qualitative national study of nurses’ clinical knowledge development of pain in pediatric intensive care2012In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 107-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Vulnerable children undergoing intensive care might still experience pain when they should not, due tonurses and pediatricians insufficient knowledge about how critical illness affects childrens’ signs of pain. How signs ofpain are learned in clinical practice might be one of the remaining aspects in nurses insufficient pain alleviation. In theworkplace learning is directed by what the units shared meaning finds as significant and meaningful to learn. However,what it is viewed as meaningful to learn about pain from the nurses’ perspective might not be meaningful from the child’sperspective. When working together in the PICU, nurses rely on each other and interact in many ways, and theirunderstanding is related to situated knowledge and facilitated by a personal reference group of colleagues. Professionalconcern, depending on culture, traditions, habits, and workplace structures forms the clinical learning patterns in thePICU. However little is known about nurses’ clinical learning patterns or collegial facilitation within the PICU. Theseassumptions lead to the aim of the study: to elucidate patterns in clinical knowledge development and unfold the role offacilitator nurses in relation to pain management in the PICU.

    Method: The study had a qualitative interpretive design approach using semi-structured interviews, analyzed withqualitative content analysis to elucidate both manifest and latent content.

    Results: The findings elucidates that the workplace culture supports or hinders learning and collaboration. Knowledgedevelopment within practice is closely connected to the workplace culture and to nurses’ significant networks. Thefindings also clarify that nurses needs to feel safe in the workplace and on an individual level to build and rely onsignificant networks that facilitates their own personal knowledge development. There is an ongoing interaction betweenthe learning patterns and the facilitation the significant networks offer.

    Conclusions: Nurses need to embrace effective learning about children’s pain from day one. Lack of a facilitatingstructure for learning, lack of assessment within clinical practice, and the focus on the individual nurses’ learning areremaining considerable problems when it comes to alleviating the vulnerable child’s pain. To increase the possibility ofpain alleviation in the clinical setting, it is of importance to attend to the caring culture and build a safe collaborative culture that is patient centered. This requires an environment that allows for open discussion, where questioning andreflecting is a natural part of the culture within the group. These factors need highlighting and thorough examination fromthe organization. Nurses focus on learning, and interact in a learning community of practice that is furthered when theyexperience a safe environment and find that their questions are taken seriously. Approaches to promote a scholarship ofnursing care are needed to develop clinical learning and, consequently, raise the quality of pain care.

  • 47.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Ingrid
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Klinisk slutexamination inom specialistsjuksköterskeutbildningen – bra idé eller inte?2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med den kliniska delen av slutexaminationen är att pröva om studenten i slutet av sin utbildning uppnått den kliniska kompetens som krävs av en nyutexaminerad specialistsjuksköterska baserat på Kompetensbeskrivning för legitimerad sjuksköterska med specialistsjuksköterskeexamen inriktning intensivvård (2012) och Högskoleförordningen 1993:100. Samt att studenten nått de lärandemål som avses i enlighet med de nationella målen  vilka kan beskrivas kortfattat enligt följande: För specialistsjuksköterska med inriktning mot intensivvård skall studenten visa förmåga att observera och bedöma funktionen hos patienter avseende alla organsystem och patientens psykiska tillstånd samt förmåga att vid behov initiera och självständigt utföra medicinska åtgärder. Examinationen syftar vidare till att pröva studentens förmåga att självständigt och med fördjupad förmåga planera, leda, verkställa och utvärdera vården av en intensivvårdspatient samt kommunicera effektivt med övriga medlemmar i vårdteamet.

    Val av patient Lämplig patient väljs av bedömningsansvarig sjuksköterska. Patienten skall om möjligt inte vara känd för studenten sedan tidigare. Patienten skall vara i behov av både omvårdande och medicinska åtgärder. Genomförande Examinationen görs på den avdelning där studenten fullgör sin sista VFU. Studenten får rapport av avlämnade personal och inhämtar även information från journal och konsultation med andra professioner vid behov. Under en 3-5 timmars period vårdar sedan studenten självständigt patienten och genomför bedömning, planering, interventioner, utvärdering, dokumentation och rapportering gällande patienten samt utförda åtgärder.

    Fördjupande/klargörande diskussion & bedömning Efter examinationstiden görs en fördjupad/klargörande diskussion där student, bedömningsansvarig ssk och lärare deltar. Studenten rapporterar och reflekterar över patientens situation och omvårdnads/medicinska vårdbehov samt sin egen insats. Uppföljningen visar att studenterna är väldigt nöjda, känner sig trygga och stolta över sig själva och att de kliniska utbildningsledarna är väldigt nöjda.

  • 48.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute.
    Larsson, Katrin
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Lejonhufvud, Ulla
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    They have their whole life in front of them2019In: Acta Scientific Pediatrics, ISSN 2581-883X, Vol. 2, no 6, p. 28-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The objectives for the study was to describe challenges in caring for children in adult intensive care units as perceived by the intensive care nurse.

    Research Methodology: A phenomenographic method was used since the aim of this study was to uncover nurses´ experiences of a phenomenon in their everyday clinical lifeworld. Setting, eight semi-structured interviews were conducted with intensive care nurses working in two different hospitals in Mid Sweden.

    Result: The result revealed several qualitatively different internal challenges connected to caring for a critically ill child. Two qualitatively different main categories: Internal Challenges with subcategories Fear and Empowerment and External Challenges with subcategories Learning environment, Another way of working. and Environment.

    Conclusion: Children’s vulnerable position in health care is clearly revealed in this study as it uncovers intensive care nurses face fear and uncertainty as a result of lack of adequate experience and knowledge when caring for children in the AICU.

    Clinical Relevance: The external challenges perceived by AICU nurses when caring for critically ill children are closely linked to the internal challenges. And highlights the need of a systematic and well-designed in-service training and learning environment for nurses working in an AICU. A systematic and close collaboration with a PICU with possibilities to interchange should be a prerequisite when caring for children in the AICU. 

  • 49.
    Mattsson, Janet Yvonne
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Arman, Maria
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Castren, Maaret
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Forsner, Maria
    Högskolan Dalarna, Omvårdnad.
    Meaning of caring in pediatric intensive care unit from the perspective of parents: A qualitative study2014In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 336-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When children are critically ill, parents still strive to be present and participate in the care of their child. Pediatric intensive care differs from other realms of pediatric care as the nature of care is technically advanced and rather obstructing than encouraging parental involvement or closeness, either physically or emotionally, with the critically ill child. The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of caring in the pediatric intensive care unit from the perspective of parents. The design of this study followed Benner's interpretive phenomenological method. Eleven parents of seven children participated in observations and interviews. The following aspects of caring were illustrated in the themes arising from the findings: being a bridge to the child on the edge, building a sheltered atmosphere, meeting the child's needs, and adapting the environment for family life. The overall impression is that the phenomenon of caring is experienced exclusively when it is directed toward the exposed child. The conclusion drawn is that caring is present when providing expert physical care combined with fulfilling emotional needs and supporting continuing daily parental care for the child in an inviting environment.

  • 50.
    Mattsson, Janet Yvonne
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute.
    Forsner, Maria
    Högskolan Dalarna, Omvårdnad.
    Arman, Maria
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institute.
    Uncovering pain in critically ill non-verbal children: Nurses' clinical experiences in the paediatric intensive care unit2011In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 187-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Critically ill paediatric patients are frequently exposed to pain that is required to be assessed and treated effectively. The most reliable resource for assessing pain is the child itself, but children in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) are commonly unable to communicate their needs, requiring professional caregivers to uncover and interpret pain. However, nurses and paediatricians do not have sufficient knowledge of how critical illness affects childrens' signs of pain. The aim of this study was to illuminate clinical experiences of pain in the PICU; describing nurses' perceptions of expressions of pain in non-verbal, critically ill 2-6 year old children. The participants were 17 experienced PICU nurses. Data were analysed according to the phenomenographic method and three qualitatively different main categories, gained from clinical experience, emerged: changes in the measurable parameters; perceived muscular tension; and, altered behaviour. Furthermore, contrasting the categories revealed two diverse perspectives to focus pain: measure-oriented and patient-oriented. Subtle expressions of pain were recognised when focus was patient-oriented. These findings support the necessity of actively looking for pain deriving from various perspectives and considering diverse caring needs when doing so. Acknowledging pain makes pain visible.

12 1 - 50 of 62
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf