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  • 1.
    Stridh, Sara
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Integrativ Fysiologi.
    Kerjaschki, D
    Clinical Institute of Pathology, Medical University Vienna, Vienna, Austria.
    Chen, Y
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Wallenberg Laboratory, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rügheimer, Louise
    Uppsala universitet, Integrativ Fysiologi.
    Åstrand, A B M
    Department of Physiology, Institute of Physiology and Pharmacology, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johnsson, Cecilia
    Uppsala universitet, Transplantationskirurgi.
    Friberg, P
    Clinical Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Olerud, Johan
    Uppsala universitet, Integrativ Fysiologi.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Uppsala universitet, Integrativ Fysiologi.
    Takahashi, T
    Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hoshi University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Ikegami-Kawai, M
    Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hoshi University, Tokyo, Japan.
    Hansell, Peter
    Uppsala universitet, Integrativ Fysiologi.
    Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition blocks interstitial hyaluronan dissipation in the neonatal rat kidney via hyaluronan synthase 2 and hyaluronidase 12011In: Matrix Biology, ISSN 0945-053X, E-ISSN 1569-1802, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 62-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A functional renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is required for normal kidney development. Neonatal inhibition of the RAS in rats results in long-term pathological renal phenotype and causes hyaluronan (HA), which is involved in morphogenesis and inflammation, to accumulate. To elucidate the mechanisms, intrarenal HA content was followed during neonatal completion of nephrogenesis with or without angiotensin converting enzyme inhibition (ACEI) together with mRNA expression of hyaluronan synthases (HAS), hyaluronidases (Hyal), urinary hyaluronidase activity and cortical lymphatic vessels, which facilitate the drainage of HA from the tissue. In 6-8days old control rats cortical HA content was high and reduced by 93% on days 10-21, reaching adult low levels. Medullary HA content was high on days 6-8 and then reduced by 85% to 12-fold above cortical levels at day 21. In neonatally ACEI-treated rats the reduction in HA was abolished. Temporal expression of HAS2 corresponded with the reduction in HA content in the normal kidney. In ACEI-treated animals cortical HAS2 remained twice the expression of controls. Medullary Hyal1 increased in controls but decreased in ACEI-treated animals. Urine hyaluronidase activity decreased with time in control animals while in ACEI-treated animals it was initially 50% lower and did not change over time. Cells expressing the lymphatic endothelial mucoprotein podoplanin in ACEI-treated animals were increased 18-fold compared to controls suggesting compensation. In conclusion, the high renal HA content is rapidly reduced due to reduced HAS2 and increased Hyal1 mRNA expressions. Normal angiotensin II function is crucial for inducing these changes. Due to the extreme water-attracting and pro-inflammatory properties of HA, accumulation in the neonatally ACEI-treated kidneys may partly explain the pathological renal phenotype of the adult kidney, which include reduced urinary concentration ability and tubulointerstitial inflammation.

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