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  • 51.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare.
    The non-verbal communication in handover situations are the spice between the lines, to understand the severity of the patient’s condition2017In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 7, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate emergency nurses’ experiences of verbal handover from emergency medicalservices and through these experiences uncover patient safety issues in the handover situation.Methods: Design: The design is qualitative inductive and aims to deepen the understanding of the handover situation and touncover the nurses’ experiences in such a situation. Methods: A qualitative research process which takes its departure in patientsafety theory. Nine informants were interviewed and a content analysis was applied.Results: The results show that a lack of structure, lack of seeing the non-verbal communication, the nurses’ own requirement forfull control and the lack of active listening involves patient safety risks. Emergency nurses want a handover that is personal andprovides a comprehensive picture of the patient to support, deepen or contradict the verbal handover given.Practical implications: The non-verbal communication in the handover situation is key to understand the severity of the situationand give the nurses profane knowledge how to prepare the continuing nursing care. To further support the understanding of thesituation, information should be presented in chronological order.KeyWords: Communication, Handover, Patient safety

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  • 52.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare.
    The sound of potency: an observational study2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to investigate the nurse ́approach to sound in an hightechnological pediatric intensive care unit. The method used derived from a theorethical perspective based on Patricia benner interpretative phenomenology.How the caregivers aknowledge the sounds in the Environment is based on their knowledge of how it affects the severly ill Children but also on the caring Culture. The result showed Three qualitative variations of approaches to sound in closeness to the critically ill Child. They are presented as follows: The room as a situation, the room as a workplace and the room as a place to rest. A central phenomenon uncovered in the observations were how the caring culture normalized the sound level to theextent that it was neglected, unless called upon as a direct reaction in combination with other signs of critical incidents. Sound was accepted at high levels close to the child's ears. Noise levels increased when a new child arrived in the room or when the round came in. A fundamental difference was uncovered when the children's room was approached as a room for recovery. Then nurses actively kept a low sound level andarranged interventions accordingly. No connections between childrens' gender, age or medical status could be found.

  • 53.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    They have their whole life left2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 54.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Twelve tipps on interview as datacollecting technique - a workshop2019Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 55.
    Mattsson, Janet
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Uncovering pain and caring for children in the pediatric intensive care unit: nurses’ clinical approach and parent’s perspective2013Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The thesis has a standpoint in a synthesis of caring science and educationscience from a clinical perspective. Children in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) are in an exposed position, dependent on nurses to acknowledge their needs. The alleviation of children’s pain has been investigated from various perspectives, but undertreated pain remains a problem in the PICU. There is a preponderance of empirical evidence pointing toward the role of nurses in uncovering children’s pain and suffering. How nurses interpret the child’s expressions and judge the clinical situation influences their actions in the clinical care. In a PICU, the basis for nurses’ concerns and interpretation of what is meaningful in the nursing care situation are formed by professional concern, workplace culture, traditions, habits, and workplace structures. This influences how parents interpret the meaning of care as well. Patricia Benner’s theory on clinical judgment forms a reference framework for this thesis. The assumption is that children need to be approached from a holistic perspective in the caring situation in order to acknowledge their caring needs. A nurse’s clinical education and insights allow for the possibility to enhance the quality of care for children and parents in the PICU.

    Aim: To uncover clinical concerns, from caring and learning perspectives, in caring for children in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) from nurses and parents perspective.

    Methods: Qualitative methods were used in all studies to unfold and explore the phenomena in the nurses’ and parents’ everyday clinical life world. In Papers I and II, a phenomenographic method was adopted. In Papers III and IV, an interpretive phenomenological approach was adopted.

    Findings: Nurses that have a holistic view of the child and approach the child from a multidimensional perspective, with a focus on the individual child and his/her caring needs, develop a clinical “connoisseurship” and meet the parents’ expectations of the meaning of care. The nurses express that it is only when they focus on the child that subtle signs of pain are revealed. The meaning of nursing care, in the ideal case, is a holistic care where all aspects are integrated and the child as a person has first priority.

    Conclusion: The meaning of caring and children’s needs must become elucidated to improve the cultural influence of what can be seen as good nursing care within the PICU.

  • 56.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare. The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Vårdande och omvårdnad av kritiskt sjuka barn2017Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 57.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare. The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    What's That Sound? An Observation Study Of Nurses' Approach To Sound In A Pediatric Intensive Care Unit2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The noise levels in adult intensive care is a well-researched phenomenon which constantly exceeds international and national recommendations.In the pediatric intensive care, the caregivers of the children work in a high tech environment as they are surrounded by sound from several sources of various kinds.How they understand and acknowledges these sounds negative effect on the child’s well-being depend on their individual knowledge and awareness of how sound can affect children negatively. However, for a critically ill child who comes to the intensive care unit, this is in most cases a new experience which in itself means greater stress.Both the environment itself and the noise levels.

    Objectives

    This study intends to investigate the nurses' approach to three sources of sound that contribute to high noise levels;alarms, doors that open and conversation.The theoretical perspective in the study is based on studies on caring culture.

    Methods

    Non Participation semi-structured qualitative observations were conducted in a pediatric intensive care unit of one of Sweden's metropolitan regions in the winter of 2014-2015.

    Conclusions/Results

    The results show that high noise levels are an overlooked phenomenon in the pediatric intensive care environment as it has given way to other priorities in the nurse's work.It is also clear that this depends on the department's caring culture as it prioritizes other things which results in normalizing high levels of noise as a part of the pediatric intensive care environment.

  • 58.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    Södersjukhuset / Karolinska Institutet.
    Forsner, M.
    Södersjukhuset / Karolinska Institutet.
    Castren, M.
    Södersjukhuset / Karolinska Institutet.
    Arman, M.
    Södersjukhuset / Karolinska Institutet.
    Clinical judgement of pain in the non-verbal child at the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to explore PICU nurses’ experiences of clinical judgment of pain in critically ill non-verbal children. The alleviation of children’s pain has been investigated from various perspectives but undertreated pain remains a problem in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit with empirical evidence pointing towards the role of nurses and their pain judgment process.

    Summary of work: A phenomenographic method containing interviews was of seventeen experienced PICU nurses. Three categories emerged, describing nurses’ experiences of clinical judgment of pain from diverse perspective and levels of understanding.

    Summary of results: The findings are hierarchically ordered A, B, C, with A as the most elaborate level of understanding. (A), named Knowledge orientation, takes various aspects of pain in consideration and relates it to theoretical as well as experiential knowledge. (B), called Investigating orientation is focused on the specific child and this child’s specific pain cues, requiring the parent’s engagement. In (C) Practical orientation the judgment process is unsystematic, building on experiential knowledge.

    Conclusions: This study puts forward that the clinical judgment process has direct implications for how nurses take contextual factors, the child’s condition and the parents’ perceptions into consideration when judging the severity and intensity of the child’s pain, and by extension the child’s pain alleviation.

    Take-home messages: Increased awareness on nurses’ judgment processes benefits nursing care and nurses becomes more aware of how their judgment process directly affects the alleviation of pain. Finding ways of applying theoretical and experiential knowledge ineveryday care is proposed to systematically facilitate this

  • 59.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Forsner, M. F.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Castrén, M. C.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Bolander Laksov, K. B.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Arman, M. A.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    A qualitative national study of nurses’ clinical knowledge development of pain in Pediatric Intensive Care2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 60.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College. Institutet, Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset.
    Forsner, Maria
    Academy Health and Society, Health Science, Nursing care. Högskolan Dalarna.
    Bolander Laksov, Klara
    Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Medical Education, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics.
    Facilitation of learning in specialist nursing training in the PICU: The supervisors’ concerns in the learning situation2014In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 4, no 12, p. 34-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the aim to unfold nurses’ concerns of the supervision of the student in the clinical caring situation of the vulnerable child, clinical nurses situated supervision of postgraduate nursing students in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) are explored. A qualitative approach, interpretive phenomenology, with participant observations and narrative interviews, was used. Two qualitative variations of patterns of meaning for the nurses’ clinical facilitation were disclosed in this study. Learning by doing theme supports the students learning by doing through performing skills and embracing routines. The reflecting theme supports thinking and awareness of the situation. As the supervisor often serves as a role model for the student this might have an immediate impact on how the student applies nursing care in the beginning of his or her career. If the clinical supervisor narrows the perspective and hinders room for learning the student will bring less knowledge from the clinical education than expected, which might result in reduced nursing quality.

  • 61.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset; Karolinska Institutet.
    Forsner, Maria
    Högskolan Dalarna, Omvårdnad.
    Castrén, Maaret
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset; Karolinska Institutet.
    Arman, Maria
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Karolinska Institutet.
    Clinical Judgment of Pain in the Non-Verbal Child at the PICU: A Phenomenographic Study2011In: Journal of Palliative Care & Medicine, ISSN 2165-7386, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 102-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 62.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science and Education; Södersjukhuset.
    Forsner, Maria
    Högskolan Dalarna, Omvårdnad.
    Castrén, Maaret
    Karolinska Institutet. Department of Clinical Science and Education; Södersjukhuset and Section of Emergency Medicine.
    Bolander Laksov, Klara
    Karolinska Institutet, Centre for Medical Education, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics.
    Arman, Maria
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society.
    A qualitative national study of nurses’ clinical knowledge development of pain in pediatric intensive care2012In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 107-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Vulnerable children undergoing intensive care might still experience pain when they should not, due tonurses and pediatricians insufficient knowledge about how critical illness affects childrens’ signs of pain. How signs ofpain are learned in clinical practice might be one of the remaining aspects in nurses insufficient pain alleviation. In theworkplace learning is directed by what the units shared meaning finds as significant and meaningful to learn. However,what it is viewed as meaningful to learn about pain from the nurses’ perspective might not be meaningful from the child’sperspective. When working together in the PICU, nurses rely on each other and interact in many ways, and theirunderstanding is related to situated knowledge and facilitated by a personal reference group of colleagues. Professionalconcern, depending on culture, traditions, habits, and workplace structures forms the clinical learning patterns in thePICU. However little is known about nurses’ clinical learning patterns or collegial facilitation within the PICU. Theseassumptions lead to the aim of the study: to elucidate patterns in clinical knowledge development and unfold the role offacilitator nurses in relation to pain management in the PICU.

    Method: The study had a qualitative interpretive design approach using semi-structured interviews, analyzed withqualitative content analysis to elucidate both manifest and latent content.

    Results: The findings elucidates that the workplace culture supports or hinders learning and collaboration. Knowledgedevelopment within practice is closely connected to the workplace culture and to nurses’ significant networks. Thefindings also clarify that nurses needs to feel safe in the workplace and on an individual level to build and rely onsignificant networks that facilitates their own personal knowledge development. There is an ongoing interaction betweenthe learning patterns and the facilitation the significant networks offer.

    Conclusions: Nurses need to embrace effective learning about children’s pain from day one. Lack of a facilitatingstructure for learning, lack of assessment within clinical practice, and the focus on the individual nurses’ learning areremaining considerable problems when it comes to alleviating the vulnerable child’s pain. To increase the possibility ofpain alleviation in the clinical setting, it is of importance to attend to the caring culture and build a safe collaborative culture that is patient centered. This requires an environment that allows for open discussion, where questioning andreflecting is a natural part of the culture within the group. These factors need highlighting and thorough examination fromthe organization. Nurses focus on learning, and interact in a learning community of practice that is furthered when theyexperience a safe environment and find that their questions are taken seriously. Approaches to promote a scholarship ofnursing care are needed to develop clinical learning and, consequently, raise the quality of pain care.

  • 63.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Ingrid
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Klinisk slutexamination inom specialistsjuksköterskeutbildningen – bra idé eller inte?2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med den kliniska delen av slutexaminationen är att pröva om studenten i slutet av sin utbildning uppnått den kliniska kompetens som krävs av en nyutexaminerad specialistsjuksköterska baserat på Kompetensbeskrivning för legitimerad sjuksköterska med specialistsjuksköterskeexamen inriktning intensivvård (2012) och Högskoleförordningen 1993:100. Samt att studenten nått de lärandemål som avses i enlighet med de nationella målen  vilka kan beskrivas kortfattat enligt följande: För specialistsjuksköterska med inriktning mot intensivvård skall studenten visa förmåga att observera och bedöma funktionen hos patienter avseende alla organsystem och patientens psykiska tillstånd samt förmåga att vid behov initiera och självständigt utföra medicinska åtgärder. Examinationen syftar vidare till att pröva studentens förmåga att självständigt och med fördjupad förmåga planera, leda, verkställa och utvärdera vården av en intensivvårdspatient samt kommunicera effektivt med övriga medlemmar i vårdteamet.

    Val av patient Lämplig patient väljs av bedömningsansvarig sjuksköterska. Patienten skall om möjligt inte vara känd för studenten sedan tidigare. Patienten skall vara i behov av både omvårdande och medicinska åtgärder. Genomförande Examinationen görs på den avdelning där studenten fullgör sin sista VFU. Studenten får rapport av avlämnade personal och inhämtar även information från journal och konsultation med andra professioner vid behov. Under en 3-5 timmars period vårdar sedan studenten självständigt patienten och genomför bedömning, planering, interventioner, utvärdering, dokumentation och rapportering gällande patienten samt utförda åtgärder.

    Fördjupande/klargörande diskussion & bedömning Efter examinationstiden görs en fördjupad/klargörande diskussion där student, bedömningsansvarig ssk och lärare deltar. Studenten rapporterar och reflekterar över patientens situation och omvårdnads/medicinska vårdbehov samt sin egen insats. Uppföljningen visar att studenterna är väldigt nöjda, känner sig trygga och stolta över sig själva och att de kliniska utbildningsledarna är väldigt nöjda.

  • 64.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Education, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Elin
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences.
    George-Svahn, Lisa
    Rinkeby Primary Care Center, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Scheers Andersson, Elina
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björling, Gunilla
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences. Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden;Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College, Moshi, Tanzania.
    Nurses’ Experiences of Caring for Patients With Suspected or Confirmed COVID-19 in the Initial Stage of the Pandemic2022In: Sage Open Nursing, E-ISSN 2377-9608, Vol. 8, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Nursing staff have faced various challenges during the global pandemic of COVID-19 such as nursing shortages. The great number of COVID-19 patients requiring hospitalization placed heavy demands on healthcare staff to maintain patient safety and to work according to constantly changing guidelines to prevent the spread of infection.

    Objective: The objective was to describe nurses’ experiences of caring for patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 in the initial phase of the pandemic.

    Methods: The study has a qualitative design. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with seven nurses in primary care and hospital care during the initial stage of the pandemic. Qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach was used.

    Results: The nurses expressed that the working routines changed very quickly at the onset of the pandemic. A triage system was implemented to care for patients with symptoms of COVID-19 to prevent transmission between patients. A major change was the constant use of personal protective equipment in patient care. The nurses also experienced a sense of inadequacy regarding the care of the patients and became emotionally affected and exhausted.

    Conclusion: The nurses experienced that many patients worsened clinically, leading to exhausting and difficult nursing care situations. They also experienced increasing responsibility since new protective equipment and procedures needed to be quickly implemented according to frequently changing recommendations, causing the nurses to feel uncertain about how to maintain patient safety. Support from colleagues was crucial to cope throughout the initial stage of the pandemic.

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  • 65.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute.
    Larsson, Katrin
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Lejonhufvud, Ulla
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    They have their whole life in front of them2019In: Acta Scientific Paediatrics, ISSN 2581-883X, Vol. 2, no 6, p. 28-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The objectives for the study was to describe challenges in caring for children in adult intensive care units as perceived by the intensive care nurse.

    Research Methodology: A phenomenographic method was used since the aim of this study was to uncover nurses´ experiences of a phenomenon in their everyday clinical lifeworld. Setting, eight semi-structured interviews were conducted with intensive care nurses working in two different hospitals in Mid Sweden.

    Result: The result revealed several qualitatively different internal challenges connected to caring for a critically ill child. Two qualitatively different main categories: Internal Challenges with subcategories Fear and Empowerment and External Challenges with subcategories Learning environment, Another way of working. and Environment.

    Conclusion: Children’s vulnerable position in health care is clearly revealed in this study as it uncovers intensive care nurses face fear and uncertainty as a result of lack of adequate experience and knowledge when caring for children in the AICU.

    Clinical Relevance: The external challenges perceived by AICU nurses when caring for critically ill children are closely linked to the internal challenges. And highlights the need of a systematic and well-designed in-service training and learning environment for nurses working in an AICU. A systematic and close collaboration with a PICU with possibilities to interchange should be a prerequisite when caring for children in the AICU. 

  • 66.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Lunnelie, Johan
    Swedish Red Cross University.
    Löfholm, Tim
    Swedish Red Cross University.
    Scheers Andersson, Elina
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Aune, Ragnhild E.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway.
    Björling, Gunilla
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College, Tanzania.
    Quality Of Life in Children With Home Mechanical Ventilation – A Scoping Review2022In: Sage Open Nursing, E-ISSN 2377-9608, Vol. 8, p. 1-12Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Home mechanical ventilation is an established method to support children suffering from chronic respiratory insufficiency, still more research is needed regarding mechanically ventilated children’s and adolescents’ quality of life (QoL). Therefore, the aim of this scoping review was to explore research regarding QoL and lived experience of children and adolescents with home mechanical ventilation. 

    Methods: A scoping review with systematic searches for research studies published between year 2000–2020 was performed in Cinahl, Medline, and PubMed. Studies that met the inclusion criteria were quality assessed and a thematic analysis was performed.

    Results: In total, ten articles were quality assessed and included in the results. Four themes emerged: Children’s self-reported QoL, Parents’ perception and parent-proxy report, Differences between the child’s and parent’s perception, and challenges in daily life. Children with home mechanical ventilation reported a lower QoL than healthy children and children with other chronic diseases. Generally, parents rate their child’s QoL lower than the children themselves.

    Conclusion: This is the first literature review focusing on HMV in the paediatric population. It is clear that HMV does not only affect the treated child or adolescent but also the whole family. It is important to regularly measure and evaluate QoL in children and adolescents with

  • 67.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Meijers, J.
    Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Sweden.
    Björling, Gunilla
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Delirium, How Do Nurses Cope In The PICU2022In: Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, ISSN 1529-7535, E-ISSN 1947-3893, Vol. 23, no Supplement 1 11S, article id PP089Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 68.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, LIME, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden;Children’s Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Meijers, Johannes
    Children’s Perioperative Medicine and Intensive Care, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björling, Gunilla
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden;Faculty of Nursing, Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College, Moshi, Tanzania.
    Challenges in Nursing Care of Children With Substance Withdrawal Syndrome in the PICU2022In: Sage Open Nursing, E-ISSN 2377-9608, Vol. 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Substance withdrawal is one of the most common advert events in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), as the administration of potent opiates and sedative drugs is frequently performed several times each day.

    Objectives: The present study explored the challenges in nursing care of children with substance withdrawal syndrome inthe PICU.

    Method: The study has an explorative and descriptive semi-structured qualitative interview design, with a strategic selection of informants. It was conducted at one out of three pediatric intensive care units in Sweden.

    Results: Three different main themes were identified describing the different challenges regarding withdrawal symptoms: monitor the child’s interest, work with structured support, and understand the observation.

    Conclusions: There is a discrepancy between the medical perspective and the nursing care perspective regarding children in PICU suffering from withdrawal syndrome. The lack of joint guidelines, language, and nursing diagnoses may lead to subjective evaluations and increase suffering for these children.

  • 69.
    Mattsson, Janet Yvonne
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Arman, Maria
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Castren, Maaret
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Forsner, Maria
    Högskolan Dalarna, Omvårdnad.
    Meaning of caring in pediatric intensive care unit from the perspective of parents: A qualitative study2014In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 336-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When children are critically ill, parents still strive to be present and participate in the care of their child. Pediatric intensive care differs from other realms of pediatric care as the nature of care is technically advanced and rather obstructing than encouraging parental involvement or closeness, either physically or emotionally, with the critically ill child. The aim of this study was to elucidate the meaning of caring in the pediatric intensive care unit from the perspective of parents. The design of this study followed Benner's interpretive phenomenological method. Eleven parents of seven children participated in observations and interviews. The following aspects of caring were illustrated in the themes arising from the findings: being a bridge to the child on the edge, building a sheltered atmosphere, meeting the child's needs, and adapting the environment for family life. The overall impression is that the phenomenon of caring is experienced exclusively when it is directed toward the exposed child. The conclusion drawn is that caring is present when providing expert physical care combined with fulfilling emotional needs and supporting continuing daily parental care for the child in an inviting environment.

  • 70.
    Mattsson, Janet Yvonne
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute.
    Forsner, Maria
    Högskolan Dalarna, Omvårdnad.
    Arman, Maria
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institute.
    Uncovering pain in critically ill non-verbal children: Nurses' clinical experiences in the paediatric intensive care unit2011In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 187-198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Critically ill paediatric patients are frequently exposed to pain that is required to be assessed and treated effectively. The most reliable resource for assessing pain is the child itself, but children in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) are commonly unable to communicate their needs, requiring professional caregivers to uncover and interpret pain. However, nurses and paediatricians do not have sufficient knowledge of how critical illness affects childrens' signs of pain. The aim of this study was to illuminate clinical experiences of pain in the PICU; describing nurses' perceptions of expressions of pain in non-verbal, critically ill 2-6 year old children. The participants were 17 experienced PICU nurses. Data were analysed according to the phenomenographic method and three qualitatively different main categories, gained from clinical experience, emerged: changes in the measurable parameters; perceived muscular tension; and, altered behaviour. Furthermore, contrasting the categories revealed two diverse perspectives to focus pain: measure-oriented and patient-oriented. Subtle expressions of pain were recognised when focus was patient-oriented. These findings support the necessity of actively looking for pain deriving from various perspectives and considering diverse caring needs when doing so. Acknowledging pain makes pain visible.

  • 71.
    Mattsson, Janet Yvonne
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet; Sachsska Barnsjukhuset.
    Forsner, Maria
    Högskolan Dalarna, Omvårdnad.
    Castrén, Maaret
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet; Sachsska Barnsjukhuset.
    Arman, Maria
    Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institutet; Sachsska Barnsjukhuset.
    Caring for children in pediatric intensive care units: An observation study focusing on nurses' concerns2013In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 528-538Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children in the pediatric intensive care unit are indisputably in a vulnerable position, dependent on nurses to acknowledge their needs. It is assumed that children should be approached from a holistic perspective in the caring situation to meet their caring needs. The aim of the study was to unfold the meaning of nursing care through nurses’ concerns when caring for children in the pediatric intensive care unit. To investigate the qualitative aspects of practice embedded in the caring situation, the interpretive phenomenological approach was adopted for the study. The findings revealed three patterns: medically oriented nursing—here, the nurses attend to just the medical needs, and nursing care is at its minimum, leaving the children’s needs unmet; parent-oriented nursing care—here, the nursing care emphasizes the parents’ needs in the situation, and the children are viewed as a part of the parent and not as an individual child with specific caring needs; and smooth operating nursing care orientation—here, the nursing care is focused on the child as a whole human being, adding value to the nursing care. The conclusion drawn suggests that nursing care does not always respond to the needs of the child, jeopardizing the well-being of the child and leaving them at risk for experiencing pain and suffering. The concerns present in nursing care has been shown to be the divider of the meaning of nursing care and need to become elucidated in order to improve the cultural influence of what can be seen as good nursing care within the pediatric intensive care unit.

  • 72.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Östlund, Britt
    KTH.
    Björling, Gunilla
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Williamsson, Anna
    KTH.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH.
    Interprofessional Learning for Enhanced Patient Safety: Biomedical Engineering Students and Nursing Students in Joint Learning Activities2019In: Journal of Research in Interprofessional Practice and Education, E-ISSN 1916-7342, Vol. 9, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the last decade, research has highlighted the importance of interprofessional approaches to education and practice. Collaboration between medical practice and engineering has been identified as particularly relevant to developing accountable models for sustainable healthcare and overcoming increased specialization leading to professional barriers. This study aims to analyze insights and understanding expressed by nursing students and biomedical engineering students following a joint learning activity regarding a medical device used in the hospital setting.

    Method: A qualitative approach deriving from a phenomenological view examined an interprofessional learning activity where the focus was on active integration and knowledge exchange.

    Conclusion: The activity was expressed as a positive opportunity for getting insights into perspectives from other professional groups as well as insights into the importance of a system perspective in patient safety. The learning and insights listed in the evaluations included ideas about how the two professional groups could collaborate in the future.

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  • 73.
    Mellgren, Emma
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare. Karolinska University Hospital / Karolinska Institutet.
    The sound of potency: An observation study of nurses' approach to sound in a pediatric intensive care unit2017In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7940, E-ISSN 2324-7959, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 46-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the nurses’ approach to three sources of sound that contribute to high noise levels; alarms, doors that open and conversation.

    Methods: Methods used derived from a theoretical perspective based on interpretive phenomenology and caring culture. In the pediatric intensive care, the caregivers of the children work in a high-tech environment as they are surrounded by sound from several sources. How caregivers understand and acknowledge how these sounds negatively affect a child’s well-being depends on their individual knowledge and awareness of how children are affected by sound. In most cases, coming into an intensive care unit is a new experience for a child. This causes greater stress, both from the environment itself as well as from sound levels. The method was built on a phenomenological perspective and an interpretive non-participation, semi-structured observations were conducted in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of one of Sweden’s metropolitan regions in the winter of 2014-2015.

    Results: The results show that noise is an overlooked phenomenon in the pediatric intensive care environment as it has given way to other priorities in the nurse’s work. It is also apparent that this depends on the department’s caring culture as it prioritizes other things, resulting in normalizing high levels of noise as a part of the pediatric intensive care environment.

    Conclusions: Noise levels are not a priority in the department’s caring culture. High noise levels are permitted unreflectedly and appears to be a token of potency and an accepted part of the health care environment.

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  • 74.
    Nilsson, S
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Berghammer, M
    University West, Sweden; The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Sweden.
    Brorsson, A-L
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Forsner, M
    Karolinska Instututet, Sweden; Umeå University, Sweden.
    Jenholt Nolbris, M
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; University West, Sweden.
    Kull, I
    Karolinska Intitutet, Sweden; Sachs' Children and Youth Hospital, Sweden.
    Lindholm Olinder, A
    Karolinska Intitutet, Sweden; Sachs' Children and Youth Hospital, Sweden.
    Ragnarsson, S
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Rullander, A-C
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Rydström, L-L
    Karolinska Intitutet, Sweden.
    Andréia Garcia de Avila, M
    Botucatu Medical School - UNESP, Brazil.
    Olaya-Contreras, P
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    To be or not to be vaccinated against COVID-19 - the adolescents' perspective - a mixed-methods study in Sweden2021In: Vaccine: X, ISSN 2590-1362, Vol. 9, article id 100117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vaccination of the population seems to be an important strategy in halting the COVID-19 pandemic in both local and global society. The aim of this study was to explore Swedish adolescents' willingness to be vaccinated against COVID-19 and its association with sociodemographic and other possible factors. A survey was distributed in Sweden between 7 July and 8 November 2020. The main qualitative question concerned adolescents' thoughts on vaccination against COVID-19 and evaluated whether the adolescents would like to be vaccinated when a COVID-19 vaccine is made available. In total, 702 adolescents aged between 15-19 responded to the questionnaire. A convergent parallel mixed-methods design was used. The results showed that nearly one in three adolescents had not decided if they wanted to get a COVID-19 vaccine, i.e. 30.5%: n=214. Of the participants 54.3% (n=381) were willing to be vaccinated. Girls had higher levels of anxiety about the vaccine compared to boys. In addition, high levels of anxiety impacted on the participants' willingness to be vaccinated. One reason for being undecided about the vaccine was that participants felt they did not know enough about it. Practising social distancing increased willingness to be vaccinated, as reflected in the qualitative results which showed participants wanted to be vaccinated to protect others. The results impart important knowledge to healthcare professionals and contribute to their communication with adolescents about vaccine hesitancy.

  • 75.
    Pahlin, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Karolina Institutet.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Digital Documentation Platforms in Prehospital Care - Do They Support the Nursing Care2019In: International Journal of Higher Education, ISSN 1927-6044, E-ISSN 1927-6052, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 84-91Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines and describe the ambulance nurse's experience of nursing documentation in single responderand the transfer of the documentation to other care levels. A qualitative design was used with focus groupinterviews as data collection method to enhance knowledge of the everyday experience of nursing documentation.The ambulance service in Sweden is a profession in transition that evolved from being a transport organization toprovide advanced medical care and nursing. However, all patients do not need advanced medical treatment and theSingle responder is an alternative resource to the ambulance that is used when no life-threatening conditions exists.However, the nurse faces a number of challenges when documenting nursing care interventions related totechnological development and the mismatch between the care offered and people's demands and needs. Even thoughnursing care documentation is key to enhance and develop patient safety within a young field as ambulance service.There is a lack of a coherent documentation system and two themes emerged through content analyzeswhich conveyed how nursing care becomes invisible and how nursing care interventions are communicated througha hidden language. There are serious shortcomings in the transfer of nursing documentation to other care levels aswell as deficiencies in the nursing documentation. Which jeopardizes the quality of care and patient safety as well asa systematic development of nursing care in this field.

  • 76.
    Rydhamn Ledin, Ellinor
    et al.
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Andrea
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    Mattsson, Janet
    University of South-Eastern Norway, Norway; Kristianstad University, Sweden.
    What choice do you have knowing your child can't breathe?!: Adaptation to Parenthood for Children Who Have Received a Tracheostomy2024In: Sage Open Nursing, E-ISSN 2377-9608, Vol. 10, article id 23779608241245502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction A growing number of parents are navigating parenthood influenced by medical complexity and technological dependency as the group of children with long-term tracheostomy grows. However, little is known regarding the parental experiences of parenthood for this heterogeneous group of children now surviving through infancy and intensive care.Objective This study aimed to analyze how parents of children who have received a tracheostomy adapted to parenthood.Methods Interviews were conducted and analyzed following a constructivist grounded theory approach. Ten parents of seven children living with a tracheostomy in Sweden were recruited via the long-term intensive care unit (ICU).Results The core variable of parenthood "Stuck in survival" was explained by two categories and six subcategories. The category "Unaddressed previous history" describes the experiences from being in the ICU environment and how the parents are not able, due to insufficient time and resources, to address these stressful experiences. The category "Falling through the cracks of a rigid system" describes how the parents found themselves and their children to be continuously ill-fitted in a medical system impossible to adapt to their needs and situation. Parents placed the starting point of parenthood with the birth of the child, whilst the tracheotomy only constituted a turning point and would lead to the loss of any previously held expectations regarding parenthood.Conclusion This study identified a previously undescribed period prior to tracheostomy placement, which may have long-lasting effects on these families. The care provided in ICUs following the birth of a child who will require tracheostomy may not be tailored or adapted to accommodate the needs of these families leading to long-lasting effects on parenthood.

  • 77.
    Rydström, Lise-Lott
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Ångström-Brännström, Charlotte
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Blake, Lucy
    University of the West of England (UWE), UK.
    Brayl, Lucy
    Edge Hill University, UK.
    Carter, Bernie
    University of the West of England (UWE), UK.
    Forsner, Maria
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Matsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Nilsson, Stefan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Akademi, Health and Care Sciences and The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Sweden.
    Jenholt Nolbris, Margaretha
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrenska Akademi, Health and Care Sciences and The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Sweden.
    Kirton, Jennifer
    Edge Hill University, UK.
    Kull, Inger
    Karolinska Intitutet, Sweden; Södersjukhuset, Sweden.
    Protheroe, Joanne
    Keele University, UK.
    Rullander, Anna-Clara
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Saron, Holly
    Edge Hill University, UK.
    Lindholm Olinder, Anna
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden; Södersjukhuset, Sweden.
    How children in Sweden accessed and perceived information during the first phase of the Covid-19 pandemic2022In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 144-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe how children in Sweden accessed and perceived information about SARS-CoV2 and Covid-19 during the first phase of the outbreak.

    METHODS: This study is a substudy of an international cross-sectional online mixed methods survey examining elements of children's health literacy in relation to Covid-19. The survey included multiple-choice questions, open-ended questions and drawings and collected information from 50 Swedish children (7-12 years). Data were analysed concurrently on a descriptive level using statistics and content analysis. Quantitative and qualitative data, including the drawings, were considered equally important and resulted in six categories, illuminating how children accessed and perceived information about the pandemic.

    RESULTS: The survey showed that children accessed information mainly from school but also from TV. They preferred information from reliable sources. Children reported the information they accessed as easy to understand and it prompted them to ask new questions. They reported they knew a lot about the pandemic, for example, the potential danger to themselves and others and how to act to protect themselves and others. They perceived the pandemic as an intrusion on their lives.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that Swedish children between 7 and 12 years old were well informed about SARS-CoV2 and Covid-19 during the first phase of the pandemic. School was shown to be an important source of information. The children could explain how to act to protect themselves and others from becoming infected by the virus.

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  • 78.
    Silén, Charlotte
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Bolander Laksov, Klara
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Engqvist Boman, Lena
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Mattsson, Janet
    Karolinska Institutet.
    A masters’ programme in medical education as a strategy for implementing scholarship of teaching and learning2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Increasing interest is directed towards longitudinal and organizational approaches to educational development in medical education. This paper reports on a strategic approach aiming to enhance educational development. A master’s programme in medical education was implemented in which a model of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, SoTL was applied throughout the prog-ramme. Participants study educational problems in their own practice, explore existing knowledge within medical education, investigate and develop their practice, document the process, get feedback from peers and make the results public. The participants come from different professions, like physicians, nurses, physiotherapists and represent different nationalities.

    Summary of Work: The outcomes in terms of learning, professional development and dissemination were examined. Students from the first two cohorts (n=25) answered an open-ended questionnaire regarding their learning and the impact on the organization where they work. Contributions of scholarly work in terms of publications, submissions to conferences etc. were mapped.

    Summary of Results: The results showed that they had applied a scholarly approach and changed their educational practice in different ways. Examining their own practice, relating to theory and comparing to other contexts were mentioned as important factors to develop confidence for change. 18 of 25 were involved in educational projects, eight articles had been published/submitted and 21 poster/oral presentations had been conducted.

    Discussion and Conclusions: A master’s programme with a strategic approach can enhance development of educational practice both on an individual and an organizational level.

    Take-home messages: Enhancing a SoTL approach in close connection to educational practice may support individuals’ ability to change their practice.

  • 79.
    Silén, Charlotte
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Bolander Laksov, Klara
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Engqvist Boman, Lena
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Mattsson, Janet
    Karolinska Institutet.
    A Masters’ Programme In Medical Education As A Strategy For Implementing Scholarship Of Teaching And Learning2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing interest is directed towards strategic educational development, where a longitudinal and organizational approach to education is taken (Gibbs 2013). At the Unit for Medical Education, Karolinska Institutet, a strategic approach to enhance faculty development was taken when starting a new master’s programme in medical education in 2009. A core of the strategic approach was to apply a model of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning, SoTL, developed at the centre (Bolander Laksov et al 2010). The SoTL model forms the basis for the first year in the programme and promotes an inquiring approach to local practice from micro level(pedagogical encounters, courses) to macro level (educational leadership, organizational learning). This means that during the programme the participants study educational problems in their own practice, explore existing knowledge within the area of medical education, investigate and develop their practice, document the development process, get feedback from peers and make the results public to others. The participants come from different professions, like physicians, nurses, physiotherapists and represent different nationalities. The programme is international, runs halftime mostly online and is planned to stimulate participants to engage in learning processes of students, academics, professionals and patients. The start of the programme has been described in Bolander Laksov et al (2014).

    Aim and methods

    This paper examines the outcomes of the master’s programme in terms of learning, professional development and dissemination. Students from the first two cohorts (n=25) were approached with an open-ended questionnaire regarding their perceptions of what they learned and how they had made use of their learning from the programme in the organization where they work. 18 students were included in the study. How students had contributed with scholarly work in terms of presentations, publications, submissions toconferences were mapped. The data was analysed through qualitative content analysis (Graneheim and Lundman, 2004).

    The results showed that all students in the study changed their educational practice in some way and they mentioned the scholarly approach as a benefit to their work. The possibility to examine their own practice, relate to theory and compare to other contexts was mentioned as important to the development of knowledge and confidence for change. They used what they have learned in their daily work in different ways and five (n= 25) had got a new position related to education. The mapping of scholarly work, including all student who have finished the first year showed that many (n=18) have or are in the process of developing their project from the first year, seven articles have been published/submitted based on the developmental work in the programme and 21 poster/oral presentations have been conducted.

    These results indicate that the master’s programme can be important in the development of educational practice. This study is the first step aiming to understand the impact of a master’s program, based on the idea of promoting SoTL, as a strategic approach enhancing educational and faculty development.

    Bolander Laksov, K., McGrath, C., Silén, C. (2010) CME - guide 6 Scholarship of Teaching and Learning- the road to an academic perspective on teaching.

    Bolander Laksov, K., Silén. C., Engqvist Boman.L.(2014) Implementation of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning through an On-line Master’s Program.I Sullivan, K., Czigler,P., Sullivan Hellgren, J.(red) Professional Distance Education Degree Programs and Practices.IGL Global: Hershey, USA

    Gibbs, G.(2013) Reflections on the changing nature of educational development International. Journal for Academic Development, vol.18, No1, pp 4-14

    Graneheim, U.H. and Lundman, B. (2004), “Qualitative content analysis in nursing research: concepts, procedures and measures toachieve trustworthiness”. Nurse Education Today, Vol. 24 No. 2, pp.105-12

  • 80.
    Stevens, Lena
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Att handleda för mig2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Critical care nurses need to possess theoretical knowledge, advanced skills as well as competencies and capabilities to care forcritically ill patients in the challenging and fast changing environment of intensive care. In order to assess performance andlearning in critical care nursing students in the clinical setting, a structured process enabling college faculty, clinical educators andstudents to work towards the same goals and learning outcomes is of outmost importance. In this study action research was usedto develop an assessment instrument in a collaborative effort between faculty, clinical educators and students. The instrument wasdeveloped and tested at several clinical sites during a period of 11/2 years. Interviews were conducted with expert focus groupsand students about the ease and feasibility of the instrument. Four themes emerged during the analysis of the interviews: clarity,helping me, arranging and timeliness. The analysis further revealed positive opinions about the structure, content and usability ofthe instrument. We conclude that the instrument helps in both assessing student performance and in revealing knowledge-gaps forthe students in the critical care nursing program.

  • 81.
    Stevens, Lena
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare.
    Development of an individual assessment instrument for critical care nursing students2017In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 54-61Article in journal (Refereed)
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    Development
  • 82.
    Södergren, Ulrika
    et al.
    Old age psychiatric unit, Stadshagen, Stockholms county.
    Benjaminson, Carin
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare.
    Becoming a Specialist Nurse in Psychiatric Mental Health Care2017In: International Journal of Higher Education, ISSN 1927-6044, E-ISSN 1927-6052, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 17-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    Becoming
  • 83.
    Tollstern Landin, Teresia
    et al.
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Melin, Tove
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences.
    Mark Kimaka, Victoria
    Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College, Moshi, Tanzania; Tumanini University, Makumira, Tanzania.
    Hallberg, David
    University of Douala, Douala, Cameroon.
    Kidayi, Paolo
    Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College, Moshi, Tanzania; Tumanini University, Makumira, Tanzania.
    Machange, Rogathe
    Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College, Moshi, Tanzania; Tumanini University, Makumira, Tanzania.
    Mattsson, Janet
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska institutet.
    Björling, Gunilla
    Swedish Red Cross University, Department of Health Sciences. Kilimanjaro Christian Medical University College, Moshi, Tanzania; Tumanini University, Makumira, Tanzania.
    Sexual Harassment in Clinical Practice—A Cross-Sectional Study Among Nurses and Nursing Students in Sub-Saharan Africa2020In: Sage Open Nursing, E-ISSN 2377-9608, Vol. 6, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Sexual harassment (SH) at the workplace is a globally discussed topic and one deserving of scrutiny. It is an issue that is often avoided although around 25% of nurses worldwide have experienced some form of SH at their workplace. Consequences of SH at workplaces can be very serious and an occupation hazard for nurses around the world. In Sub-Saharan Africa there is also a need for more studies in the field.

    Objective

    The overall aim was to determine the prevalence, types, and consequences of sexual harassment among nurses and nursing students at a regional university hospital in Tanzania.

    Methods

    The study has a cross-sectional design. A study specific questionnaire was distributed to a total of 200 nurses and nursing students. Descriptive statistics were used for calculation of frequencies, prevalence, including gender differences, types, and consequences of sexual harassment.

    Results

    The result show that 9.6% of the participants had experienced some form of SH at their workplace. Regarding the female nurses and students, 10.5% had been sexually harassed at work, whereas the number for males was 7.8%, but 36% knew about a friend who had been sexually harassed. The most common perpetrator were physicians. The victims of SH were uncomfortable going back to work, felt ashamed and angry.

    Conclusions

    In conclusion, nearly 10% of the participants had been exposed to sexual harassment. However, an even greater number of victims was found when including by proxy victims of sexual harassment. SH can become a serious occupational hazard and stigmatization for nurses. Enhanced knowledge is needed, and hospitals and medical colleges should emphasize their possibilities to give support and assistance to the victims of SH. Education about SH in all levels and prevention methods should also be emphasized.

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  • 84.
    Östlund, Britt
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. KTH.
    Björling, Gunilla
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Stridh, Sara
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Sahlström, Madeleine
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Technology in Health Care: A new research and teaching subject in collaboration between nursing science and engineering2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Today, health care systems face a number of challenges related to technological developments. This work in progress is a new Swedish initiative for collaboration between nursing science and engineering focusing digitization, demographics and participation. The initiative aims at understanding how digitization affects patients and health care professionals and the role of engineers and how this collaboration proactively contributes to systems that support caring and nursing. The presentation expects input on the programs substance and boundaries and whether this initiative is fruitful to create sustainable health care systems.

  • 85.
    Östlund, Britt
    et al.
    KTH.
    Björling, Gunilla
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Stridh, Sara
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Sahlström, Madeleine
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Digitizing Health Care in Collaboration Between Nursing and Engineering: Two cases of strategic learning and implementationof robots in the homes of elderly people2018In: International Journal On Advances in Life Sciences, ISSN 1942-2660, E-ISSN 1942-2660, Vol. 10, no 1 & 2, p. 11-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digitization exceeds the limits of healthcare meetings, which gives renewed relevance to examine the collaboration between engineers and nurses. Caring for people is no longer just something going on in the hospital but at new arenas at home and in the middle of people's everyday lives. In caring situations nurse's responsibility is, unlike the physician, to make observations and to follow in detail the patient's caring needs, and where engineers provide technological devices to support and monitor the course of the disease. When digitizing the caring situation person-centered care gets a new meaning. For engineers the understanding of how technology is contextualized and domesticated becomes even more important to make applications and systems work outside laboratories. This paper presents two cases of interaction between engineers and nurses aimed at improving the implementation of robots and sensorsin elderly people ́s homes; and learning how to improve patient safety in hospitals.The result shows that conflicting epistemologies, differences in professional languages and lack of joint learning opportunities are factors that create obstacles for interactions. The conclusionsreject the idea of linear innovation processes and showthat successful ccollaborationtake more than just adding two and two together. Especially digitization is breaking up traditional barriers and hierarchies. For nurses to be proactive requires knowledge about technological developments and the ability toparticipate in design and innovation processes. For engineers a more thorough understanding of caring situations and users will contribute to a more reliable provision of digitalsolutions and point at new ideas leading up to innovations. The main output of the paper is that it is deepening the understanding of what factors leading to successfulcollaborations between nursing and engineering and what are the missing links.

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