Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 77
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Barkestad, Eva
    et al.
    Andersson, Ingrid
    Gustafsson, Ingrid
    Hyllienmark, Petra
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Stevens, Lena
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Säkra kunskap och kvalitet: utmaningar för framtidens anestesi och intensivvårdssjuksköterska2017In: Ventilen, ISSN 0348-6257, no 4, p. 16-18Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Björling, Gunilla
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Material Wear of Medical Technical Products: Impact on patient safety2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of a central venous catheters (CVC) always involves an increased risk of infection and thrombotic complications, subsequently increasing patient suffering, prolonged care and health care related costs. One contributing cause of infection is that the surface of the catheter is quickly colonized by bacteria, forming a biofilm, hard to reach by and/or resistant to antibiotics and the patient’s immune defense system. Catheter related thrombosis may also promote colonization of microbes on the fibrin sheet at the surface, and at the same time impact on CVC functionality by lumen occlusion or, in a rare worst-case scenario – cause life threatening embolic events. Coatings with silver or metal alloys can reduce the risk for complications. Our research group have previously identified a correlation between material degradation in medical devices used in patients and exposure time and infections. This talk will discuss the impact of material degradation of different types of CVCs used for patients undergoing chemotherapy against breast cancer.  The results from an evaluation study of a anti infectious noble metal alloy coated CVC compared with an uncoated CVC for tolerability (Adverse Events, AEs), performance and noble metal durability on the surface will also be discussed.

  • 3.
    Björling, Gunilla
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. KI.
    Fossum, Maren
    NTNU.
    Aune, Ragnhild
    NTNU.
    Cytostatika-inducerad materialnedbrytning av subkutana venportar: En preliminär jämförande in-vitro och in-vivostudie2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Björling, Gunilla
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Johansson, Dorota
    Bactiguard.
    Sanchez, Javier
    Karolinska Institutet / Bactiguard.
    Frostell, Claes
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Bergström, Linda
    Bactiguard.
    Kalman, Sigridur
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Evaluation of Tolerability and Performance of BIP Central Venous Catheter with a noble metal alloy coating: A Clinical Tolerability Study2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Björling, Gunilla
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Johansson, Dorota
    Bactiguard, Stockholm.
    Bergström, Linda
    Bactiguard, Stockholm.
    Strekalovsky, Anton
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Sanchez, Javier
    Karolinska Institutet / Bactiguard, Stockholm.
    Frostell, Claes
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Kalman, Sigridur
    Karolinska University Hospital / Karolinska Institutet.
    Evaluation of central venous catheters coated with a noble metal alloy - A randomized clinical pilot study of coating durability, performance and tolerability2018In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part B - Applied biomaterials, ISSN 1552-4973, E-ISSN 1552-4981, Vol. 106, no 6, p. 2337-2344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of Central Venous Catheters (CVCs) commonly results in complications. Coatings with silver or metal alloys can reduce the risk associated with the use of CVC. We have evaluated the durability of a noble metal coated CVC (the Bactiguard Infectious Protection, BIP CVC) and compared with an uncoated CVC for clinical tolerability (Adverse Events, AEs) and performance, in order to create a baseline for a large future study. Patients undergoing major surgery, randomised at a 2:1 ratio to BIP CVC (n = 22) or standard CVC (n = 12), were catheterized 9 - 12 days, respectively. Adverse events, microbial colonization and metal release were measured.

    FINDINGS: There were no AEs in the BIP CVC-group, but 5 AEs occurred in 4 patients (1 patient had 2 AEs) in the standard CVC-group, p = 0.011 (whereof 3 were catheter related). The BIP CVC showed an initial release of coating metals in blood (gold, silver and palladium), which rapidly decreased and were far below Permitted Paily Exposure (PDE) for chronical use. The levels of silver concentration were far below those needed to develop microbial resistance. The performance was equal, and there was no difference concerning microbial colonization, for the two CVCs.

    CONCLUSION: In this pilot study the BIP CVC had significantly lower AEs and showed a comparable performance to the standard CVC. The coating was durable throughout the study length (up to 16 days) and toxicological evaluation showed good safety margins. Larger studies are needed.

  • 6.
    Bränström, Richard
    et al.
    Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, USA / Karolinska Institutet.
    Hatzenbuehler, Mark L
    Columbia University, New York, USA.
    Tinghög, Petter
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Pachankis, John E
    Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, USA.
    Sexual orientation differences in outpatient psychiatric treatment and antidepressant usage: evidence from a population-based study of siblings2018In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 591-599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past two decades, population-based health surveys have begun including measures of sexual orientation, permitting estimates of sexual orientation disparities in psychiatric morbidity and differences in treatment utilization. The present study takes advantage of the high-quality, comprehensive nationwide health registry data available in Sweden to examine whether psychiatric outpatient treatment for various diagnoses and antidepressant medication usage are greater in sexual minority individuals compared to their siblings. A longitudinal cohort study design was used with a representative random population-based sample in Stockholm, Sweden. Registry-based health record data on all specialized outpatient health care visits and prescription drug use was linked to a sample of 1154 sexual minority individuals from the Stockholm Public Health Cohort and their siblings. The main outcomes were treatment due to psychiatric diagnoses retrieved from nationwide registry-based health records. In analyses accounting for dependency between siblings, gay men/lesbians had a greater likelihood of being treated for mood disorder [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.77; 99% confidence intervals (CI) 1.00, 3.16] and being prescribed antidepressants (AOR 1.51; 99% CI 1.10, 2.07) compared to their siblings. Further, bisexual individuals had a greater likelihood of any outpatient psychiatric treatment (AOR 1.69; 99% CI 1.17, 2.45) and being prescribed antidepressants (AOR 1.48; 99% CI 1.07, 2.05) as well as a greater likelihood of being treated for a mood disorder (AOR 1.98; 99% CI 1.33, 2.95) compared to their siblings. No difference in anxiety or substance use disorder treatment was found between any sexual minority subgroup and their siblings. The potential role of familial confounding in psychiatric disorder treatment was not supported for more than half of the outcomes that were examined. Results suggest that sexual minority individuals are significantly more likely to be treated for certain psychiatric disorders compared to their siblings. Future research is needed to understand mechanisms other than familial factors that might cause the substantial treatment differences based on sexual orientation reported here.

  • 7.
    Burström, Åsa
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet / Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital.
    Acuna Mora, Mariela
    University of Gothenburg / KU Leuven, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Leuven, Belgium.
    Öjmyr-Joelsson, Maria
    Karolinska Institutet / Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital.
    Sparud-Lundin, Carina
    University of Gothenburg.
    Rydberg, Annika
    Umeå University.
    Hanseus, Katarina
    Skåne University Hospital.
    Frenckner, Björn
    Karolinska Institutet / Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital.
    Nisell, Margret
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Moons, Philip
    University of Gothenburg / KU Leuven, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Leuven, Belgium.
    Bratt, Ewa-Lena
    University of Gothenburg / The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital.
    Parental Uncertainty About Transferring Their Adolescent with Congenital Heart Disease to Adult Care2018In: Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN 0309-2402, E-ISSN 1365-2648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To study parent's levels of uncertainty related to the transfer from pediatric to adult care in adolescents with Congenital Heart Disease (CHD) and to identify potentially correlating factors.

    BACKGROUND: Parents acknowledge that during transition they struggle with finding ways of feeling secure in handing over the responsibility and letting go of control. Well-prepared and informed parents who feel secure are most likely better skilled to support their adolescent and to hand over the responsibility.

    DESIGN: A cross-sectional study.

    METHODS: Overall, 351 parents were included (35% response rate). Parental uncertainty was assessed using a Linear Analogue Scale (0-100). Data was collected between January - August 2016. Potential correlates were assessed using the readiness for transition questionnaire and sociodemographic data.

    RESULTS: The mean parental uncertainty score was 42.5. Twenty-four percent of the parents had a very low level of uncertainty (score 0-10) and 7% had a very high level (score 91-100). Overall, 26% of the mothers and 36% of the fathers indicated that they had not started thinking of the transfer yet. The level of uncertainty was negatively associated with the level of perceived overall readiness. Adolescents' age, sex, CHD complexity and parental age were not related to uncertainty.

    CONCLUSION: A wide range in the levels of uncertainty was found. Parents who were less involved in the care, or perceived their adolescent as readier for the transition, felt less uncertain. Still, thirty percent of the parents had not started to think about the transfer to adult care. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Chatchumni, Manaporn
    et al.
    Rangsit University, Pathumthani, Thailand.
    Namvongprom, Ampaporn
    Rangsit University, Pathumthani, Thailand.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Mazaheri, Monir
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Engagement and availability in shaping nurses’ management of postoperative pain: a qualitative study2018In: Electronic Physician, ISSN 2008-5842, Vol. 10, no 8, p. 7235-7242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Studies reporting inadequate nursing care for patients indicate that nurses are negatively affected in such situations, and research is needed to study nursing care in postoperative situations. Objective: To describe situations of postoperative pain management in a surgical ward in Thailand. Methods: A qualitative approach using the Critical Incident Technique was chosen to investigate situations of postoperative pain management from the perspective of surgical nurses in Thailand. Data were collected through multiple semi-structured interviews with nine nurses over a five-week period. Results: The situations of surgical nurses described three elements that heavily influenced the quality of postoperative pain management: engagement in a trustful nurse-patient relationship, availability of pain medication and nursing care when needed, and imbalance between meeting the patient’s needs and completing routine nursing duties. Conclusion: The results help to expand our understanding of how Thai nurses manage pain in postoperative situations and indicate areas that could be improved in terms of how nurses respond to patients’ pain. Nurses challenge existing guidelines and facilitate development of new nursing guidelines and/or policies in pain management.

  • 9.
    Christidis, Maria
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Lindberg, Viveca
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Lärares samverkan för yrkeskunnande: Engl. translation: Teachers’ Cooperation for Vocational Knowing2017In: Yrkesdidaktikens mångfald / [ed] Andreas Fejes, Viveca Lindberg, Gun-Britt Wärvik, Stockholm: Lärarförlaget , 2017, 1Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Based on a study of curriculum integration in Swedish upper secondary education, at a Health and Social Care Programme (Christidis, 2014), the issue of this chapter is how general subjects can contribute to vocational knowing in the interaction between teachers and students. Inspired by an ethnographic approach, classroom observations, interviews and documents formed the data, and for the analysis concepts from activity theory were used. Main results were that teachers’ and students’ experiences used in teaching focused three actors’ perspectives: those of nurse-assistants’, patients’ and relatives’. These were expressed in subject specific as well as interdisciplinary teaching of general and vocational subjects. Using subject integration made it possible for both teachers and students to explore connections between the subjects. Furthermore, subject integration contributed to one of the main goals of the Health and Social Care Programme: to develop a holistic view of the human being.

  • 10.
    Crafoord, Marie-Therese
    et al.
    Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Fagerdahl, Ann-Mari
    Södersjukhuset, Karolinska Institutet.
    Operating Room Nurses’ Perceptions of the Clinical Learning Environment: A Survey Study2018In: Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing: Continuing Competence for the Future, ISSN 0022-0124, E-ISSN 1938-2472, Vol. 49, no 9, p. 416-423Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Authors commonly agree that the clinical learning environment significantly affects student learning. Studies of how operating room nurses perceive the clinical learning environment during their specialist studies are sparse. 

    Method: This study aimed to examine newly graduated operating room nurses’ perceptions of the clinical learning environment during their specialist education. Fifty newly graduated operating room nurses answered a questionnaire gaging their perceptions of clinical education. 

    Results: Most participants perceived the clinical learning environment as good and highly associated with the supervisor’s ability to supervise, enjoy supervision, and show interest in the participants’ degree project. The management at the clinical setting, which was perceived to emphasize the importance of supervision, time allocated especially for supervision, and perceived cooperation between the University and hospital, also had an impact. 

    Conclusion: Social interactions and structures within the operating room affect how the clinical learning environment is perceived. 

  • 11.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Det subversiva arvet: Global Omvårdnad och relationer till vetenskapliga doktriner – en personlig betraktelse2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Intimitetens villkor i vårdandet2017In: Genusperspektiv på vård och omvårdnad / [ed] Helén Strömberg & Henrik Eriksson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, 3, p. 71-86Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    What is nursing? Nursing as the science of human life in a postmodern era: Clues from the past to understand the road ahead2018In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 117-118Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Dahlborg-Lyckhage, Elisabeth
    Högskolan Väst.
    Om Genus - introduktion2017In: Genusperspektiv på vård och omvårdnad / [ed] Helén Strömberg och Henrik Eriksson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, 3, p. 15-30Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Jönköping University.
    Röster från sidlinjen - former och normer i anhörigspelet2017In: Genusperspektiv på vård och omvårdnad / [ed] Helén Strömberg & Henrik Eriksson, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2017, 3, p. 149-166-Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, HelénUmeå Universitet.
    Genusperspektiv på vård och omvårdnad2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Det som vanligen benämns genusfrågor är inte bara en angelägenhet för akademin och forskare, utan begreppet diskuteras i såväl politisk som populärvetenskaplig debatt.

    Genusrelaterade, feministiska  och/eller jämställdhetsfrågor är viktiga för samhället och för individer i många olika sammanhang. Men vad är egentligen genus och vad menas med att ha ett genusperspektiv? På vilket sätt kan genus vara en utgångspunkt när det talas om vård och omvårdnad som sträcker sig bortom dagsaktuella politiska utfästelser och olika myndigheters pågående jämställdhetsarbete?

    Genusperspektiv på vård och omvårdnad problematiserar vårdandet, dess handlingar, relationer och processer samt hälso-och sjukvårdens institutioner ur olika genusteoretiska perspektiv.

  • 17.
    Ernstsson, Olivia
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Tinghög, Petter
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hillert, Jan
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Burström, Kristina
    Karolinska Institutet / Stockholm County Council.
    The External Validity of Mapping MSIS-29 on EQ-5D Among Individuals With Multiple Sclerosis in Sweden2017In: Medical Decision Making Policy & Practice, ISSN 2381-4683, Vol. 2, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mapping can be performed to predict utility values from condition-specific measures when preference-based measures are absent. A previously developed algorithm that predicts EQ-5D-3L index values from the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29) has not yet been externally validated. Aim: To examine the external validity of a previously developed mapping algorithm by testing the accuracy of predicting EQ-5D-3L index values from MSIS-29 among multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in Sweden. Methods: Cross-sectional individual-level data were collected from population-based Swedish registers between 2011 and 2014. Health-related quality of life was assessed through MSIS-29 and EQ-5D-3L at one point in time among 767 individuals with known disability level of MS. A previously developed mapping algorithm was applied to predict EQ-5D index values from MSIS-29 items, and the predictive accuracy was assessed through mean absolute error and root mean square error. Results: When applying the algorithm, the predicted mean EQ-5D-3L index value was 0.77 compared to the observed mean index value of 0.75. Prediction error was higher for individuals reporting EQ-5D values <0.5 compared to individuals reporting EQ-5D values ≥0.5. Mean absolute error (0.12) and root mean square error (0.18) were smaller or equal to the prediction errors found in the original mapping study. Conclusion: The mapping algorithm had similar predictive accuracy in the two independent samples although results showed that the highest predictive performance was found in groups with better health. Varied predictive accuracy in subgroups is consistent with previous studies and strategies to deal with this are warranted.

  • 18.
    Faag, Carina
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Örebro University.
    Bergenius, Johan
    Karolinska Institutet / Karolinska University Hospital.
    Forsberg, Christina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Langius-Eklöf, Ann
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Feasibility and Effects of a Nursing Intervention for Patients with Peripheral Vestibular Disorders2017In: Rehabilitation Nursing, ISSN 0278-4807, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 274-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility and possible outcomes of a nursing intervention in patients with peripheral vestibular disorders. Design: A randomized controlled trial (RCT). Methods: Thirty-six patients participated in the study: the intervention group (n = 18), who received the intervention, and patients in a control group (n = 18), who received standard care. The intervention includes patient education and individualized nursing support during a 6-month rehabilitation period. Outcomes were symptoms, well-being, sense of coherence, and self-care measured at baseline before randomization and at 6 and 9 months later. Findings: At the 9-month follow up, the patients who received the intervention rated significantly fewer vertigo-related symptoms and a higher sense of coherence than the control group. Conclusion: The intervention was feasible and seems to support the patients to manage symptoms, but confirmative studies are warranted. Clinical Relevance: Patient education in combination with individual support may be beneficial to help patients with peripheral disorders during their rehabilitation.

  • 19.
    Fossum, Maren
    et al.
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    Tunc, Zozan
    KTH.
    Strömberg, Emma
    KTH.
    Frostell, Claes
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Liljegren, Annelie
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Björling, Gunilla
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Aune, Ragnhild
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
    In-vitroandIn-vivo Exposureof Intravascular Catheters to Cytostatic Drugs2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Gyllensten, Hanna
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet / University of Gothenburg.
    Kavaliunas, Andrius
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hillert, Jan
    Karolinska Institutet / Karolinska University Hospital.
    Tinghög, Petter
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Friberg, Emilie
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Costs and quality of life by disability among people with multiple sclerosis: a register-based study in Sweden2018In: Multiple sclerosis journal - experimental, translational and clinical, E-ISSN 2055-2173, Vol. 4, no 3, article id 2055217318783352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Population-based estimates of costs of illness and health-related quality of life, by disability levels among people with multiple sclerosis, are lacking.

    Objectives: To estimate the annual costs of illness and health-related quality of life, by disability levels, among multiple sclerosis patients, 21-64 years of age.

    Methods: Microdata from Swedish nationwide registers were linked to estimate the prevalence-based costs of illness in 2013, including direct costs (prescription drug use and specialised healthcare) and indirect costs (calculated using sick leave and disability pension), and health-related quality of life (estimated from the EQ-5D). Disability level was measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS).

    Results: Among 8906 multiple sclerosis patients, EDSS 0.0-3.5 and 7.0-9.5 were associated with mean indirect costs of SEK 117,609 and 461,357, respectively, whereas direct costs were similar between the categories (SEK 117,423 and 102,714, respectively). Prescription drug costs represented 40% of the costs of illness among multiple sclerosis patients with low EDSS, while among patients with high EDSS more than 80% were indirect costs. Among the 1684 individuals who had reported both EQ-5D and EDSS, the lowest health-related quality of life scores were found among those with a high EDSS.

    Conclusion: Among people with multiple sclerosis, we confirmed higher costs and lower health-related quality of life in higher disability levels, in particular high indirect costs.

  • 21.
    Gyllensten, Hanna
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet / University of Gothenburg.
    Wiberg, Michael
    Karolinska Institutet / Swedish Social Insurance Agency.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Norlund, Anders
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Friberg, Emilie
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hillert, Jan
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ernstsson, Olivia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Tinghög, Petter
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Costs of illness of multiple sclerosis in Sweden: a population-based register study of people of working age2018In: European Journal of Health Economics, ISSN 1618-7598, E-ISSN 1618-7601, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 435-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS) causes work disability and healthcare resource use, but little is known about the distribution of the associated costs to society.

    OBJECTIVES: We estimated the cost of illness (COI) of working-aged individuals with MS, from the societal perspective, overall and in different groups.

    METHODS: A population-based study was conducted, using data linked from several nationwide registers, on 14,077 individuals with MS, aged 20-64 years and living in Sweden. Prevalence-based direct and indirect costs in 2010 were calculated, including costs for prescription drug use, specialized healthcare, sick leave, and disability pension.

    RESULTS: The estimated COI of all the MS patients were SEK 3950 million, of which 75% were indirect costs. MS was the main diagnosis for resource use, causing 38% of healthcare costs and 67% of indirect costs. The distribution of costs was skewed, in which less than 25% of the patients accounted for half the total COI.

    CONCLUSIONS: Indirect costs contributed to approximately 75% of the estimated overall COI of MS patients of working age in Sweden. MS was the main diagnosis for more than half of the estimated COI in this patient group. Further studies are needed to gain knowledge on development of costs over time during the MS disease course.

  • 22.
    Hanpatchaiyakul, Kulnaree
    et al.
    Boromarajonani College of Nursing, Changwat Nonthaburi, Thailand.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Kijsomporn, Jureerat
    Praboromarajchanok Institute for Health Workforce Development, Ministry of Public Health, Thailand.
    Gunnel, Östlund
    School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Malardalen University.
    Lived Experience of Thai Women with Alcohol Addiction2017In: Asian Nursing Research, ISSN 1976-1317, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 304-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: This study explores the lived experiences of Thai women in relation to alcohol addiction in treatment. Methods: Twelve women aged 20 to 65 years, were participated. The participants were recruited from two special hospitals and one outpatient clinic in a general hospital. Descriptive phenomenology was applied to analyze the transcripts of the individual interviews. Result: The explored phenomenon of Thai women experiencing alcohol addiction included four essential aspects, (1) feeling inferior and worthless (2) feeling physically and emotionally hurt, (3) fearing physical deterioration and premature death, and (4) feeling superior and powerful. Through these different aspects of Thai women's lived experiences, the following essence was synthesized. The essence of the lived experience of alcohol addiction among the studied Thai women was ambivalence between feeling inferior and worthless and feeling superior and powerful when acting as a man. Drinking alcohol lessened life's difficulties and fears; for example, of violence, bodily demolition, premature death and marginalization from family and society. Conclusion: Thai women who experience alcohol addiction are treated with gender-related double standards when trying to undo gender traditional roles. Their marginalization from family and society deepens making them even more vulnerable to the positive side effects of alcohol drinking.

  • 23.
    Helgesson, Magnus
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Tinghög, Petter
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Wang, Mo
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Rahman, Syed
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Saboonchi, Fredrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Mittendorfer-Rutz, Ellenor
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Trajectories of work disability and unemployment among young adults with common mental disorders2018In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 18, article id 1228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundLabour-market marginalisation (LMM) and common mental disorders (CMDs) are serious societal problems. The aims were to describe trajectories of LMM (both work disability and unemployment) among young adults with and without CMDs, and to elucidate the characteristics associated with these trajectories.MethodsThe study was based on Swedish registers and consisted of all individuals 19-30years with an incident diagnosis of a CMD in year 2007 (n=7245), and a matched comparison group of individuals without mental disorders during the years 2004-07 (n=7245). Group-based trajectory models were used to describe patterns of LMM both before, and after the incident diagnosis of a CMD. Multinomial logistic regressions investigated the associations between sociodemographic and medical covariates and the identified trajectories.ResultsTwenty-six percent (n=1859) of young adults with CMDs followed trajectories of increasing or constant high levels of work disability, and 32 % (n=2302) followed trajectories of increasing or constant high unemployment. In the comparison group, just 9 % (n=665) followed increasing or constant high levels of work disability and 21 % (n=1528) followed trajectories of increasing or constant high levels of unemployment. A lower share of young adults with CMDs followed trajectories of constant low levels of work disability (n=4546, 63%) or unemployment (n=2745, 38%), compared to the level of constant low work disability (n=6158, 85%) and unemployment (n=3385, 50%) in the comparison group. Remaining trajectories were fluctuating or decreasing. Around 50% of young adults with CMDs had persistent levels of LMM at the end of follow-up. The multinomial logistic regression revealed that educational level and comorbid mental disorders discriminated trajectories of work disability, while educational level, living area and age determined differences in trajectories of unemployment (R-difference(2)=0.02-0.05, p<0.001).ConclusionsA large share, nearly 50%, of young adults with CMDs, substantially higher than in the comparison group of individuals without mental disorders, display increasing or high persistent levels of either work disability or unemployment throughout the follow-up period. Low educational level, comorbidity with other mental disorders and living in rural areas were factors that increased the probability for LMM.

  • 24.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    A Visual Analysis on How the Physical Environment Conditions Relatives' Involvement in Nursing Homes2017In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 1-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study seeks to describe how the composition of the physical care environment conditions relatives' involvement in nursing home institutions. It is well known that the physical care environment in institutions has a significant impact on the well-being of residents and the work satisfaction of nursing staff. Less explored is how physical care environmental factors are related to the involvement of relatives in nursing homes. A visual analysis of 52 photographs from three nursing homes in Sweden shows how the physical environment acts to condition the involvement of relatives through the use of design, information displays, and cultural symbols. Although various aspects of the physical environment promoted participation of relatives, that engagement was based on certain limited concepts of involvement. This suggests that other conceptual frameworks of involvement in nursing homes are possible, and that these might encourage other aspects of involvement from the relatives of nursing home residents.

  • 25.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Tegnestedt, Charlotta
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Global nursing as visualised on the internet: a netnographic analysis of the emerging global paradigm in nursing2018In: Contemporary Nurse: health care across the lifespan, ISSN 1037-6178, E-ISSN 1839-3535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Positioned to face increasing issues relating to the growing and aging population, ill health, climate change, natural disasters, and humanitarian crises, nurses play a crucial role in responding to the challenges of globalisation. With nurses rising to meet these challenges, the term ‘global nursing’ has been coined. Given the ongoing proliferation of the term, it seems relevant to explore the key relationship of the concepts of ‘global’ and ‘nursing’ within the milieus provided through the internet.

    Aim: To describe how global nursing as a concept is visualised in images on the internet.

    Method: A cross-sectional observational design based on netnographic methodology was conducted. By searching the term ‘global nursing’ in the Google search engine, a total of 973 images illustrating ‘global nursing’ were collected and stored on one specific search occasion. The inclusion of data covered all regions but no other search limits.

    Results: The results show that global nursing, first and foremost, is visualised as an academic discourse, as a nursing activity, and as an approach to target sustainability. Further, the results also highlight that global nursing has manifested as a Western discourse, targeting students with access to resources and a humanitarian interest. Conclusion: By paying attention to global nursing as it is presented in this study, it has been possible to provide valuable insights about colonial boundaries in the nursing discourse relating to globality. Based on these results, we stress that the nursing paradigm would benefit from a greater postcolonial awareness and some reflexivity connected with the global issues that nurses are facing.

    Impact statement: Global nursing is paradoxically visualised as something distant, connected to ideas of ‘otherness’, and of not belonging to the Western nursing community

  • 26.
    Holmgren, Jessica
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Kraft, Mia
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    A global nursing framework in the Swedish Red Cross undergraduate nursing program2018In: Nordic journal of nursing research, ISSN 2057-1585, E-ISSN 2057-1593, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 167-174Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Alongside a globalized world and a demographic shift in Sweden, future nurses must provide globally significant nursing care based on relevant knowledges and skills. To contribute to the global nursing discourse, this article aims to describe the process undertaken in developing and implementing a global nursing approach and curriculum in the Swedish Red Cross undergraduate nursing program. A comprehensive process of educational change was carried out, targeting both faculty and students with various academic activities. The new global-oriented curriculum was evaluated positively by nursing students, and a definition of global nursing was disseminated among educators. Nursing students at the Swedish Red Cross University College are now encouraged to advocate for vulnerable persons in need of healthcare services and to counteract inequalities and social injustice in sustainable ways. It is suggested that a global nursing framework is what is required when educating nurses to meet tomorrow’s nursing care needs.

  • 27.
    Holst, Göran
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Maria
    Lund University.
    Ahlström, Gerd
    Lund University.
    Signs in People with Intellectual Disabilities: Interviews with Managers and Staff on the Identification Process of Dementia.2018In: Healthcare, E-ISSN 2227-9032, Vol. 6, no 3, article id E103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The life expectancy of people with intellectual disabilities (ID) has steadily increased, which has been accompanied by an increased risk of dementia. Staff and managers are key resources for safety diagnosis since they deliver information about people with ID behavior every day. The aim of the present study was to explore the identification process employed by staff and managers to detect signs of suspected dementia in people with an ID within intellectual disability services (ID-services). Twenty managers and 24 staff within an ID-service were interviewed and qualitative latent content analysis was applied. A model consisting of three themes on three levels of resources for the identification process of signs of suspected dementia emerged from the analysis. On the first level was the time and continuity in the care relationship, which is crucial for identifying and responding to changes in cognitive ability that indicate dementia. On the second level, the staff identify deficiencies in their own knowledge, seek support from colleagues and managers within their workplace and, on the third level, outside their workplace. Staff and managers expressed a need for early and continuous guidance and education from specialists in dementia and primary healthcare. This finding indicates an urgent need for intervention research and digital support for staff in dementia care.

  • 28.
    Kangas-Niemi, Annina
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Manninen, Katri
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Facilitating affective elements in learning - In a palliative care context2018In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 33, p. 148-153Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore ways clinical supervisors facilitate the learning of the affective elements of professional competence in a clinical palliative care environment. The secondary aim was to advocate for and raise awareness of the importance of the affective domain in medical education.

    A clinical palliative care learning environment has been reported to be emotionally challenging. The affective and transformative learning processes taking place requires special support. However, little is known about how clinical supervisors facilitate this learning processes. A qualitative, explorative study was designed to capture supervisors' perceptions of their supervision using semi-structured interviews. Six experienced clinical supervisors working within a palliative care context were recruited using convenience sampling. Data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. The affective elements were viewed as essential for learning, clinical supervision, and professional competency. Supervisors use a variety of different ways of facilitation. Four main themes were identified; building a relationship, creating space for learning, creating a pedagogical environment, and Mirroring.

  • 29.
    Kimario, T
    et al.
    Kllimanjaro Christian Medical University College, Tanzania.
    Msuya, Maryclina
    Kllimanjaro Christian Medical University College, Tanzania.
    Chuck Mtutuya, Christina
    Kllimanjaro Christian Medical University College, Tanzania.
    Björling, Gunilla
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. KI.
    Factors Affecting Hiv Disclosure Among Partners Attending Care and Treatment at a Regional Hospital in Tanzania2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Kraft, Mia
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Understanding The Global Nursing perspective2018In: Open Access Journal of Nursing, ISSN 2639-1783, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 77-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A critical consideration of the global nursing perspective is recommended when advocating enhanced global awareness in nursing practice, education and research. Adequate knowledge transfers in global nursing are noted when nurses make appropriate choices in care actions and identify power hierarchies. The utilisation of nurses’ professional competence with respect to vulnerability in health is suggested and by focusing on inequalities in health and social justice issues in existing care hierarchies, an advancement of the patterns in global nursing discipline can be observed. This paper postulates that the global nursing discourse can be applied in nursing practice, education and research and make a contribution to equal healthcare.

  • 31.
    Kraft, Mia
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Nisell, Margret
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Addressing a global nursing perspective in an undergraduate nursing program: Student learning in clinical education2018In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 8, no 9, p. 45-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Although many educational student activities addressing global awareness are highlighted in the literature, the global nursing approach and how it is applied by students in clinical education is not widely described. After the implementation of a new global nursing curriculum, nursing students educated at The Swedish Red Cross University College are now engaged in counteracting inequalities in health. This paper aims to describe how nursing students apply the global nursing perspective during their clinical education.

    Methods: The study is based on students’ written individual reflective reports. The procedure for data analysis was inspired by a thematic and interpretive data synthesis. The four stages in Kolb’s learning cycle was used as a framework.

    Results: Four themes were identified: 1) Experiencing frailty, suffering and vulnerability; 2) Advocating quality of life and priorities in health; 3) Conceptualizing autonomy, involvement and participation; 4) Making a difference and acting with respect and an open mind.

    Conclusions: Consequently, students at the The Swedish Red Cross University College are confident in applying global nursing perspective in care actions. Nursing educators have a mutual responsibility to facilitate students’ knowledge transfers in global competencies and strategies to reduce the impact on the environment and on humans.

  • 32.
    Larsen, Joacim
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Sigvardsdotter, Erika
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Silow Kallenberg, Kim
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    The Delphi method as a way to explore underresearched areas in nursing: - refugee's health and social participation2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Delphi method developed in the 1950s in the US-Army as a way to forecast the probability of nuclear weapons usage in war by consulting "experts". From this origin the Delphi method successfully spread in dierent academic disciplines during the late 1900 to become one important method for access "expert consensus" in situations where no other evidence exist and furthermore to provide a valuable tool in the investigation of "expert opinion" and may thereby help to guide future policy directives in an era such as nursing. Objective: The aim of this presentation is to describe the possibilities of using this approach to explore under-researched areas in nursing using conclusion drawn from a scoping review of Delphi studies on refugee's health and social participation. Method: Scoping review Results: The ndings show that health workers; nurse’s, physicians, civil servants have a tremendous impact on health outcomes that occur for refugees during their adjustment to a new life and that their interpretation and implementing policies is important to consider when elaborating on health and resources of health. Conclusion and implication for practice: To conclude, emphasizing the tacit knowledge of experts the ndings show that this type of approaches can serve as a method to both investigate and establish a consensus among nurses or in areas of nursing research where evidence is lacking. Delphi method is a tool that can provide valuable insight regarding nursing knowledge that is not possible to monitor in any other way and can become more important in nursing research in the future.

  • 33.
    Lundin, Andreas
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet / Stockholm County Council.
    Åhs, Jill
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Åsbring, Nina
    Stockholm County Council.
    Kosidou, Kyriaki
    Karolinska Institutet / Stockholm County Council.
    Dal, Henrik
    Karolinska Institutet / Stockholm County Council.
    Tinghög, Petter
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Saboonchi, Fredrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Dalman, Christina
    Karolinska Institutet / Stockholm County Council.
    Discriminant validity of the 12-item version of the general health questionnaire in a Swedish case-control study2017In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 71, no 3, p. 171-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The 12-item version of the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) is widely used as a proxy for Affective Disorders in public health surveys, although the cut-off points for distress vary considerably between studies. The agreement between the GHQ-12 score and having a clinical disorder in the study population is usually unknown.

    AIMS: This study aimed to assess the criterion validity and to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the GHQ-12 in the Swedish population.

    METHODS: This study used 556 patient cases surveyed in specialized psychiatric care outpatient age- and sex-matched with 556 controls from the Stockholm Health Survey. Criterion validity for two scoring methods of GHQ-12 was tested using Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) analyses with Area Under the Curve (AUC) as a measure of agreement. Reference standard was (1) specialized psychiatric care and (2) current depression, anxiety or adjustment disorder.

    RESULTS: Both the Likert and Standard GHQ-12 scoring method discriminated excellently between individuals using specialized psychiatric services and healthy controls (Likert index AUC = 0.86, GHQ index AUC = 0.83), and between individuals with current disorder from healthy controls (Likert index AUC = 0.90, GHQ index AUC = 0.88). The best cut-off point for the GHQ index was ≥4 (sensitivity = 81.7 and specificity = 85.4), and for the Likert index ≥14 (sensitivity = 85.5 and specificity = 83.2).

    CONCLUSIONS: The GHQ-12 has excellent discriminant validity and is well suited as a non-specific measure of affective disorders in public mental health surveys.

  • 34.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare. The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Caring for dying children in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit2017Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Children's participation in the PICU from the nurses’ perspective, an observational study2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Facilitating affective elements in learning, a palliative context: medical education2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Feel me, hear me, children’s participation in the PICU2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children who are critically ill are vulnerable and the nurse has a responsibility to meet the child`s needs in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Objectives: The aim was to explore the vulnerable child's participation and how it can be understood through the nurses’ perspective in the situated nursing care intervention. By exploring ways clinical supervisors facilitate the learning of the participation from critically ill children in a clinical environment  Method: The study design was an exploratory inductive qualitative approach.  Data collection was done through observations and interviews. The data from the observations were analyzed through interpretive phenomenology. Findings: The affective elements were viewed as essential for learning to understand how children participate in the PICU and to develop professional competency. Three themes emerged through the analysis: Mediated participation, Bodily participation and Participation by proxy. They all highlight different aspect of the vulnerable child's way of participating in the nursing care given, through nurses awareness and situated salience. Conclusion: The concept participation should be redefined and broadened; as participation can present itself through the child’s body in diverse ways. considerations: Confidentiality procedures were followed, ethical permission was given from the ethical komitee at KI, and all informants participated on an informed, independent and voluntary basis. The informants that chose to participate were informed that they could cease participation at any time.

     Audience take away: 1.    The concept participation should be redefined and broadened; it should be understood and interpreted in a new way within the PICU.2.     Participation can present itself through the child’s body in diverse ways, and every person working with children needs to act accordingly. Children has a right to be involved in their care and treated as the first person the PICU nurses first responsibility lies with the child, to address their needs and their rights.   3.    We call for an awareness and a strategy on how participation can be established and strengthened in various ages at the PICU. Through the awareness of the Childs body and the technical devices the Childs needs can be interpreted and meet

    • The audience will get examples of how nurses can “listen” with their nursingcare interventions and meet the subtle signs of the childs will.  
    • It will give them evidence to be in harmony with the convention of childrens right as well as strengthen the child as a person.Practical tips on how to expand the well being of the whole family in the PICU. It also relates to the caring culture which can be studied. 

     

  • 38.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Klinisk examination2017In: AnIva kongress 2017, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Learning Strategies is a Prerequisite for High Quality Nursing Care in the PICU2018In: Acta Scientific Paediatrics, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 1-2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sometimes children get so sick that they rapidly become omitted to the most advanced level of pediatric care, the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU). This is a strange place where noise and scent as well as the touch feels different [1] to all other experiences the child might have had prior to the omittance. Research have shown that the parents perspective for the future is only a few hours [2] when their child are at the PICU. They all, in their own ways, balance between life and death. There is a real threat that the care in a PICU might end in the death of the child. In this context the PICU nurse works, learns and balances here nursing care interventions to support the child, the parents as well as being a team member with exceptional skills [3]. 

  • 40.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Participation from the nurse’s perspective in the PICU2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children who are critically ill are vulnerable and the nurse has a responsibility to meet the child`s needs in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU).

    Objectives: The aim was to explore the vulnerable child's participation and how it can be understood through the nurses’ perspective in the situated nursing care intervention. By exploring ways clinical supervisors facilitate the learning of the participation from critically ill children in a clinical environment  

    Method: The study design was an exploratory inductive qualitative approach.  Data collection was done through observations and interviews. The data from the observations were analyzed through interpretive phenomenology. 

    Findings: The affective elements were viewed as essential for learning to understand how children participate in the PICU and to develop professional competency. Three themes emerged through the analysis: Mediated participation, Bodily participation and Participation by proxy. They all highlight different aspect of the vulnerable child's way of participating in the nursing care given, through nurses awareness and situated salience.

    Conclusion: The concept participation should be redefined and broadened; as participation can present itself through the child’s body in diverse ways.

    Considerations: Confidentiality procedures were followed, ethical permission was given from the ethical komitee at KI, and all informants participated on an informed, independent and voluntary basis. The informants that chose to participate were informed that they could cease participation at any time.

  • 41.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Sound of potency. An observation study of nurses' approach to sound in a pediatric intensive care unit2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Team Training, A Prerequisite of Being Safe in a Technological Environment, A Pediatric Operating Theater2018In: Acta Scientific Paediatrics, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 18-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We all know that the digitalization is here to stay, so also in the children’s operating theater. We also know that effective teamwork is crucial for safe surgery. Changes in demographic trends and new surgical and technological innovations require close collaboration with other disciplines for a number of reasons [1]. Despite the advances in technology, making healthcare safer depends, not on minimizing the human contribution but on understanding how people, look ahead, overcome hazards and, in effect, create safety [2]. This is very true in a high technological environment that has become utterly specialized and digitalized during the last decade. As the technical devices becomes more and more complex we require another approach for interprofessional collaboration in the operating theater to keep the child safe during the operation. Especially a breakdown in communication, poor teamwork, lack of leadership and poor decision making by individuals and teams have all been shown to be major contributors to adverse events [3].

  • 43.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska University Hospital.
    Team training, a prerequisite of being safe in a technological environment, a pediatric operating theater2018In: Acta Scientific Paediatrics, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 18-19Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    The child`s needs in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU)2018Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare. The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Vårdande och omvårdnad av kritiskt sjuka barn2017Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 46.
    Mattsson, Janet
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Technology and Welfare. The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    What's That Sound? An Observation Study Of Nurses' Approach To Sound In A Pediatric Intensive Care Unit2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The noise levels in adult intensive care is a well-researched phenomenon which constantly exceeds international and national recommendations.In the pediatric intensive care, the caregivers of the children work in a high tech environment as they are surrounded by sound from several sources of various kinds.How they understand and acknowledges these sounds negative effect on the child’s well-being depend on their individual knowledge and awareness of how sound can affect children negatively. However, for a critically ill child who comes to the intensive care unit, this is in most cases a new experience which in itself means greater stress.Both the environment itself and the noise levels.

    Objectives

    This study intends to investigate the nurses' approach to three sources of sound that contribute to high noise levels;alarms, doors that open and conversation.The theoretical perspective in the study is based on studies on caring culture.

    Methods

    Non Participation semi-structured qualitative observations were conducted in a pediatric intensive care unit of one of Sweden's metropolitan regions in the winter of 2014-2015.

    Conclusions/Results

    The results show that high noise levels are an overlooked phenomenon in the pediatric intensive care environment as it has given way to other priorities in the nurse's work.It is also clear that this depends on the department's caring culture as it prioritizes other things which results in normalizing high levels of noise as a part of the pediatric intensive care environment.

  • 47.
    Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Ingrid
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Klinisk slutexamination inom specialistsjuksköterskeutbildningen – bra idé eller inte?2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med den kliniska delen av slutexaminationen är att pröva om studenten i slutet av sin utbildning uppnått den kliniska kompetens som krävs av en nyutexaminerad specialistsjuksköterska baserat på Kompetensbeskrivning för legitimerad sjuksköterska med specialistsjuksköterskeexamen inriktning intensivvård (2012) och Högskoleförordningen 1993:100. Samt att studenten nått de lärandemål som avses i enlighet med de nationella målen  vilka kan beskrivas kortfattat enligt följande: För specialistsjuksköterska med inriktning mot intensivvård skall studenten visa förmåga att observera och bedöma funktionen hos patienter avseende alla organsystem och patientens psykiska tillstånd samt förmåga att vid behov initiera och självständigt utföra medicinska åtgärder. Examinationen syftar vidare till att pröva studentens förmåga att självständigt och med fördjupad förmåga planera, leda, verkställa och utvärdera vården av en intensivvårdspatient samt kommunicera effektivt med övriga medlemmar i vårdteamet.

    Val av patient Lämplig patient väljs av bedömningsansvarig sjuksköterska. Patienten skall om möjligt inte vara känd för studenten sedan tidigare. Patienten skall vara i behov av både omvårdande och medicinska åtgärder. Genomförande Examinationen görs på den avdelning där studenten fullgör sin sista VFU. Studenten får rapport av avlämnade personal och inhämtar även information från journal och konsultation med andra professioner vid behov. Under en 3-5 timmars period vårdar sedan studenten självständigt patienten och genomför bedömning, planering, interventioner, utvärdering, dokumentation och rapportering gällande patienten samt utförda åtgärder.

    Fördjupande/klargörande diskussion & bedömning Efter examinationstiden görs en fördjupad/klargörande diskussion där student, bedömningsansvarig ssk och lärare deltar. Studenten rapporterar och reflekterar över patientens situation och omvårdnads/medicinska vårdbehov samt sin egen insats. Uppföljningen visar att studenterna är väldigt nöjda, känner sig trygga och stolta över sig själva och att de kliniska utbildningsledarna är väldigt nöjda.

  • 48.
    Murley, Chantelle
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Mogard, Olof
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Wiberg, Michael
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Karampampa, Korinna
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Friberg, Emilie
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Tinghög, Petter
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Trajectories of disposable income among people of working ages diagnosed with multiple sclerosis: a nationwide register-based cohort study in Sweden 7 years before to 4 years after diagnosis with a population-based reference group2018In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 8, no 5, article id e020392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To describe how disposable income (DI) and three main components changed, and analyse whether DI development differed from working-aged people with multiple sclerosis (MS) to a reference group from 7 years before to 4 years after diagnosis in Sweden.

    DESIGN: Population-based cohort study, 12-year follow-up (7 years before to 4 years after diagnosis).

    SETTING: Swedish working-age population with microdata linked from two nationwide registers.

    PARTICIPANTS: Residents diagnosed with MS in 2009 aged 25-59 years (n=785), and references without MS (n=7847) randomly selected with stratified matching (sex, age, education and country of birth).

    PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: DI was defined as the annual after tax sum of incomes (earnings and benefits) to measure individual economic welfare. Three main components of DI were analysed as annual sums: earnings, sickness absence benefits and disability pension benefits.

    RESULTS: We found no differences in mean annual DI between people with and without MS by independent t-tests (p values between 0.15 and 0.96). Differences were found for all studied components of DI from diagnosis year by independent t-tests, for example, in the final study year (2013): earnings (-64 867 Swedish Krona (SEK); 95% CI-79 203 to -50 528); sickness absence benefits (13 330 SEK; 95% CI 10 042 to 16 500); and disability pension benefits (21 360 SEK; 95% CI 17 380 to 25 350). A generalised estimating equation evaluated DI trajectory development between people with and without MS to find both trajectories developed in parallel, both before (-4039 SEK; 95% CI -10 536 to 2458) and after (-781 SEK; 95% CI -6988 to 5360) diagnosis.

    CONCLUSIONS: The key finding of parallel DI trajectory development between working-aged MS and references suggests minimal economic impact within the first 4 years of diagnosis. The Swedish welfare system was responsive to the observed reductions in earnings around MS diagnosis through balancing DI with morbidity-related benefits. Future decreases in economic welfare may be experienced as the disease progresses, although thorough investigation with future studies of modern cohorts are required.

  • 49.
    Nanyanzi, Salima
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Emegwa, Leah
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences. University of Gävle,.
    Lawoko, Stephen
    Karolinska Institute; Victoria University, Kampala, Uganda.
    HIV Testing Among Women of Reproductive Age Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence in Uganda2018In: Open Public Health Journal, ISSN 1874-9445, Vol. 11, p. 275-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) occur as dual epidemics with gender dimensions. IPV sometimes result in lack of decision making autonomy over one’s own health and this may negatively affect uptake HIV testing services.

    Objective:

    The study aimed to examine the association between exposure to IPV and HIV testing among women of reproductive age in Uganda.

    Method:

    The study is based on cross-sectional data from 2011 Uganda Demographic and Health Survey (UDHS). A sub-sample of 1705 ever-partnered women aged 15-49 who responded to the domestic violence module was examined in the study. Bivariate and multivariable (logistic regression) analyses were used to determine the association between exposure to IPV and HIV testing.

    Results:

    Up to 82.3% and 61.5% of the respondents were tested for HIV ever and in the past year, respectively. The prevalence of physical IPV and IPV of any form in the past year was 25.6% and 44% respectively. Exposure to physical IPV and emotional IPV in the past year was associated with HIV testing within the past year. In the multivariate analysis, exposure to physical IPV remained significantly associated with HIV testing within the past year (OR: 1.34; 95% CI: 1.03-1.73). Frequent access to newspapers remained a significant predictor of HIV testing uptake.

    Conclusion:

    HIV testing in the past year is associated with exposure to IPV among women of reproductive age in Uganda. There is a need to include IPV as a part of global strategy to address HIV/AIDS.

  • 50.
    Nordhall, Ola
    et al.
    University of Gävle.
    Knez, Igor
    University of Gävle.
    Saboonchi, Fredrik
    The Swedish Red Cross University College, Department of Health Sciences.
    Predicting general mental health and exhaustion: the role of emotion and cognition components of personal and collective work-identity.2018In: Heliyon, ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 4, no 8, article id e00735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between emotion and cognition components of personal and collective work-identity and self-reported general mental health and exhaustion, in Swedish teachers (N = 768). In line with our predictions, we showed that the emotion component of personal work-identity and the cognition component of collective work-identity associated positively with general mental health and negatively with exhaustion. The reverse result was found, however, for the cognition component of personal work-identity and emotion component of collective work-identity. In general, all this indicates that person-work bonding might, to some degree, account for general mental health and exhaustion in employees. In particular, the findings suggest that general mental health and exhaustion may vary symmetrically across the: (1) Type of person-work bonding (personal vs. collective work-identity); and (2) Type of psychological component (emotion vs. cognition) involved in personal- and collective work-identity.

12 1 - 50 of 77
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • harvard-anglia-ruskin-university
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf